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Meat and fish consumption and the risk of renal cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 136, no 5, E423-E431 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Renal cell cancer (RCC) incidence varies worldwide with a higher incidence in developed countries and lifestyle is likely to contribute to the development of this disease. We examined whether meat and fish consumption were related to the risk of RCC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The analysis included 493,179 EPIC participants, recruited between 1992 and 2000. Until December 2008, 691 RCC cases have been identified. Meat and fish consumption was assessed at baseline using country-specific dietary assessment instruments; 24-hour recalls were applied in an 8% subsample for calibration purposes. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Women with a high consumption of red meat (HR=1.36, 95% CI 1.14-1.62; calibrated, per 50 g/day) and processed meat (HR=1.78, 95% CI 1.05-3.03; calibrated, per 50 g/day) had a higher risk of RCC, while no association existed in men. For processed meat, the association with RCC incidence was prominent in premenopausal women and was lacking in postmenopausal women (p interaction=0.02). Neither poultry nor fish consumption were statistically significantly associated with the risk of RCC. The results show a distinct association of red and processed meat consumption with incident RCC in women but not in men. A biological explanation for these findings remains unclear. What's new? Kidney cancer strikes different populations with different frequency, with developed nations seeing more cases. In this paper, the authors investigate whether certain elements of diet might correlate with increased incidence of renal cell carcinoma. Using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), they assessed the amount of meat and fish consumed in populations representing a wide range of dietary habits. They then correlated this data with renal cell carcinoma incidence. They found no effect from eating fish; consuming red and processed meats did increase risk in women, but not in men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015. Vol. 136, no 5, E423-E431 p.
Keyword [en]
renal cell cancer, cohort study, red meat, processed meat
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-99350DOI: 10.1002/ijc.29236ISI: 000346350500019PubMedID: 25258006OAI: diva2:793910
Available from: 2015-03-09 Created: 2015-02-07 Last updated: 2016-06-01Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, MattiasLjungberg, Börje
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Department of Biobank ResearchUrology and Andrology
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