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Impact of Parental Socioeconomic Status on Excess Mortality in a Population-Based Cohort of Subjects With Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
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2015 (English)In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 38, no 5, 827-832 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze the possible impact of parental and individual socioeconomic status (SES) on all-cause mortality in a population-based cohort of patients with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Subjects recorded in the Swedish Childhood Diabetes Registry (SCDR) from 1 January 1978 to 31 December 2008 were included (n =14,647). The SCDR was linked to the Swedish Cause of Death Registry (CDR) and the Longitudinal Integration Database for Health Insurance and Labour Market Studies (LISA).

RESULTS: At a mean follow-up of 23.9 years (maximum 46.5 years), 238 deaths occurred in a total of 349,762 person-years at risk. In crude analyses, low maternal education predicted mortality for male patients only (P = 0.046), whereas parental income support predicted mortality in both sexes (P < 0.001 for both). In Cox models stratified by age-at-death group and adjusted for age at onset and sex, parental income support predicted mortality among young adults (≥18 years of age) but not for children. Including the adult patient’s own SES in a Cox model showed that individual income support to the patient predicted mortality occurring at ≥24 years of age when adjusting for age at onset, sex, and parental SES.

CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to low SES, mirrored by the need for income support, increases mortality risk in patients with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes who died after the age of 18 years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 38, no 5, 827-832 p.
National Category
Clinical Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101362DOI: 10.2337/dc14-1522ISI: 000353505600023OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-101362DiVA: diva2:798937
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 07531
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Berhan, YonasEliasson, MatsMöllsten, AnnaWaernbaum, IngeborgDahlquist, Gisela
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