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Iron Supplementation Until 6 Months Protects Marginally Low-Birth-Weight Infants From Iron Deficiency During Their First Year of Life
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
2015 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 60, no 3, 390-395 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Low-birth-weight (LBW) infants (<2500 g) have an increased risk of iron deficiency (ID) during their first 6 months of life. The optimal dose and duration of iron supplementation to LBW infants are, however, unknown. The objective of the present study was to investigate the long-term effect on iron status and growth in marginally LBW (2000-2500 g) infants, of iron supplements given until 6 months of life. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 285 healthy marginally LBW infants received 0, 1, or 2 mg . kg(-1).day(-1) of iron supplements from 6 weeks to 6 months of age: At 12 months and 3.5 years of life we measured length, weight, head circumference, and indicators of iron status (hemoglobin, ferritin, mean corpuscular volume, and transferrin saturation) and assessed the prevalence of iron depletion, functional ID, and ID anemia. Results: At 12 months of age, there was a significant difference in ferritin between the groups (P = 0.00 6). Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the prevalence of iron depletion (23.7%, 10.6%, and 6.8%, respectively, in the placebo, 1-mg, and 2-mg groups, P = 0.009) and similar nonsignificant trends for functional ID and ID anemia. At 3.5 years of life there were no significant differences in iron status and the mean prevalence of iron depletion was 3.2%. Anthropometric data were not affected by the intervention. Conclusions: Iron supplements with 2 mg . kg(-1) . day(-1) until 6 months of life effectively reduces the risk of ID during the first 12 months of life and is an effective intervention for preventing early ID in marginally LBW infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2015. Vol. 60, no 3, 390-395 p.
Keyword [en]
growth, infant, iron, low birth weight, supplementation
National Category
Pediatrics Gastroenterology and Hepatology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101598DOI: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000000633ISI: 000350527100024PubMedID: 25406528OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-101598DiVA: diva2:803423
Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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