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Changing patterns of residential and workplace segregation in the Stockholm metropolitan area
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Faculty of Geography, Institute of Urban Geography and Tourism Studies, University of Łódź, Kopcińskiego 31, 90-142 Łódź, Poland.
Department of Geography, University of Tartu, Vanemuise 46, Tartu, 51014, Estonia.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8913-7262
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2796-3547
2015 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 36, no 7, 969-992 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immigrant–native segregation is present in the spaces in which individuals from different ethnic/racial groups practice their everyday lives; interact with others and develop their ethnic, social and spatial networks. The overwhelming majority of academic research on immigrant segregation has focused on the residential domain, thus largely overlooking other arenas of daily interaction. The present study contributes to the emerging literature on immigrant residential and workplace segregation by examining changes in patterns of residential and workplace segregation over time. We draw our data from the Stockholm metropolitan region, Sweden’s main port of entry for immigrants. The results suggest a close association between residential and workplace segregation. Immigrant groups that are more segregated at home are also more segregated in workplace neighborhoods. More importantly, we found that a changing segregation level in one domain tends to involve a similar trend in the other domain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015. Vol. 36, no 7, 969-992 p.
Keyword [en]
segregation, immigrants, home, work, Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101956DOI: 10.1080/02723638.2015.1012364ISI: 000363317100002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-101956DiVA: diva2:805926
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2015-04-17 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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