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Heat-Related Symptoms in Sugarcane Harvesters
Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Environment International Trust, Mapua, New Zealand.
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 58, no 5, 541-548 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundExposure to heat stress is a documented risk for Central American sugarcane harvesters. However, little is known about heat-related illness in this population. MethodsThis study examined the frequency of heat-related health effects among harvesters (n=106) exposed to occupational heat stress compared to non-harvesters (n=63). Chi-square test and gamma statistic were used to evaluate differences in self-reported symptoms and trends over heat exposure categories. ResultsHeat and dehydration symptoms (headache, tachycardia, muscle cramps, fever, nausea, difficulty breathing, dizziness, swelling of hands/feet, and dysuria) were experienced at least once per week significantly more frequently among harvesters. Percentages of workers reporting heat and dehydration symptoms increased in accordance with increasing heat exposure categories. ConclusionsA large percentage of harvesters are experiencing heat illness throughout the harvest demonstrating an urgent need for improved workplace practices, particularly in light of climate change and the epidemic of chronic kidney disease prevalent in this population. Am. J. Ind. Med. 58:541-548, 2015. (c) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015. Vol. 58, no 5, 541-548 p.
Keyword [en]
agricultural worker, sugarcane, heat stress, Central America, chronic kidney disease, climate change
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-103128DOI: 10.1002/ajim.22450ISI: 000352621500007PubMedID: 25851165OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-103128DiVA: diva2:814609
Available from: 2015-05-27 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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