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Feasibility of using a humanoid robot for enhancing attention and social skills in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
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2013 (English)In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 36, no 3, 221-227 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated the use of robotic technology for promoting attention, communication and social skills in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Attention, communication and social skills were measured while participants played a memory card matching game (Face Match) using (a) a humanoid robot, (b) a Smart Board and (c) playing cards. Three participants with ASD and three with other cognitive impairments were recruited from a secondary school with a special needs unit. Participants were paired such that one of each pair had a diagnosis of ASD and Face Match was played in these pairs for similar to 15 min, with a game organizer present. On 3 separate days, video recordings were made as the participants played Face Match; a different game mode (robot, Smart Board, playing cards) was used each day. A system for categorizing attention, communication and social skills was developed that described 16 subcategories of interactions and intra-actions. In general, participants with ASD showed highly individualized patterns of behaviour in the three different modes. However, repetitive behaviour was reduced in participants with ASD when using both the robot and the Smart Board compared with playing cards. We show that it is feasible to use a robot to assist teaching of social skills to adolescents with ASD, but suggest that the robot features could be further explored and utilized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 36, no 3, 221-227 p.
Keyword [en]
autism spectrum disorder, education, robot
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104197DOI: 10.1097/MRR.0b013e32835d0b43ISI: 000323219400005PubMedID: 23328816OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-104197DiVA: diva2:818230
Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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Output format
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