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Osteoblast behavior on various ultra short pulsed laser deposited surface coatings
Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. (Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation Group)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1710-7715
SIB-Labs, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. (Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation Group)
SIB-Labs, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
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2013 (English)In: Materials Science and Engineering: C. Materials for Biological Applications, ISSN 0928-4931, Vol. 33, no 3, 1676-1682 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ultra short pulsed laser deposition technique was utilized to create amorphous diamond, alumina and carbon nitride, and two different titania coatings on silicon wafers, thus producing five different surface deposited films with variable physico-chemical properties. The surface characterizations, including the roughness, the contact angle and the zeta potential measurements were performed before we tested the growth properties of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells on these surfaces (three separate experiments). The average roughness and hydrophobicity were the highest on titania-deposited surfaces, while carbon nitride was the most hydrophilic one. Osteoblasts on all surfaces showed a flattened, spread-out morphology, although on amorphous diamond the cell shape appeared more elongated than on the other surfaces. On rough titania, the area covered by the osteoblasts was smaller than on the other ones. Cell proliferation assay did not show any statistically significant differences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013. Vol. 33, no 3, 1676-1682 p.
Keyword [en]
Surface coating, adhesion, Cell culture, Osteoblast, Ultra short laser deposition
National Category
Materials Chemistry Cell and Molecular Biology Orthopedics
Research subject
Materials Science; Orthopaedics; Physical Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104355DOI: 10.1016/j.msec.2012.12.078PubMedID: 23827623OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-104355DiVA: diva2:819247
Available from: 2015-06-10 Created: 2015-06-10 Last updated: 2017-09-05Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Studies on various culture systems for chondrocytes and osteoblasts
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studies on various culture systems for chondrocytes and osteoblasts
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Osteoarthritis and osteochondral defects are ailments that are increasing in frequency as the lifespan of the population increases and sedentary lifestyle becomes more common. Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes the progressive degeneration of articular surfaces and the underlying bone. Accidents and injuries can cause osteochondral defects similar to osteoarthritis. In both cases the structure of the articular cartilage fails, leading to pain and disability. Articular cartilage has a naturally poor ability to regenerate since there is no vasculature and it is aneural. The sparse chondrocytes mainly act to maintain the healthy extracellular matrix. Once the defect is severe enough, a surgical intervention becomes necessary. For small defects and young patients, a cell-based treatment can be used, whereas for larger defects and severe osteoarthritis a partial or whole joint arthroplasty is performed. Methods to repair osteochondral defects have been improving over the years as the inter-disciplinary understanding of joints, and what is required to repair them, has increased. However, there are still issues to solve in order to achieve consistently good results in both joint replacement and repair of cartilage. The main issue faced with current techniques used for joint replacement is poor integration of the artificial joint, leading to loosening at the bone interface over time, while cartilage repair techniques face the problem of generating mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. It is known that surface chemistry and structures at micro- and nanoscale influence cell behaviour, which can be utilised to guide their attachment, proliferation and phenotype. Scaffold-free approaches and mechanical stimulation have previously given promising results in generating articular neocartilage.

This thesis aims at exploring tools and solutions to the problems involved in implant integration, chondrocyte expansion and neocartilage tissue engineering. We hypothesised that 1) ultra-short pulsed laser deposition can be used to create biocompatible coatings; 2) micropillars with nanoscale features can improve the maintenance of the chondrocyte phenotype in culture and 3) hypergravity can aid in the production of more native-like neocartilage constructs.

Our studies showed that ultra-short pulsed laser ablation can be used to create various surfaces for studying cell behaviour. Cell viability was slightly higher on a rough titanium oxide, whereas the cell area was significantly smaller on rough titanium oxide, indicating a lower amount of focal adhesions. Nanopatterned microstructures were not capable of maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype in culture, but they were not disadvantageous either. Hypergravity might help in creating a native-like distribution of collagen and proteoglycans. The constructs were more uniform in shape, but biomechanically the constructs were not different from non-centrifuged controls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2017. 76 p.
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1911
Keyword
Cell biology, chondrocyte, osteoarthritis, surface materials, topography, tissue engineering, mechanical stimulation
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Medical Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138954 (URN)978-91-7601-757-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-09-27, Hörsal E, Humanisthuset, Umeå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2017-09-26Bibliographically approved

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Qu, ChengjuanPrittinen, JuhaLammi, Mikko

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