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Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy
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2015 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 18, 1123-U43 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: We were able to show that targeted Next-Generation Sequencing is well suited to be applied in clinical routine diagnostics, substantiating the ongoing paradigm shift from low- to high-throughput genomics in medicine. By means of our atlas of the genetics of human DCM, we aspire to soon be able to apply our findings to the individual patient with cardiomyopathy in daily clinical practice. Numerous genes are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, until now technological limitations have hindered elucidation of the contribution of all clinically relevant disease genes to DCM phenotypes in larger cohorts. We now utilized next-generation sequencing to overcome these limitations and screened all DCM disease genes in a large cohort. Methods and results: In this multi-centre, multi-national study, we have enrolled 639 patients with sporadic or familial DCM. To all samples, we applied a standardized protocol for ultra-high coverage next-generation sequencing of 84 genes, leading to 99.1% coverage of the target region with at least 50-fold and a mean read depth of 2415. In this well characterized cohort, we find the highest number of known cardiomyopathy mutations in plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein C-3, and desmoplakin. When we include yet unknown but predicted disease variants, we find titin, plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein-C 3, desmoplakin, ryanodine receptor 2, desmocollin-2, desmoglein-2, and SCN5A variants among the most commonly mutated genes. The overlap between DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and channelopathy causing mutations is considerably high. Of note, we find that >38% of patients have compound or combined mutations and 12.8% have three or even more mutations. When comparing patients recruited in the eight participating European countries we find remarkably little differences in mutation frequencies and affected genes. Conclusion: This is to our knowledge, the first study that comprehensively investigated the genetics of DCM in a large-scale cohort and across a broad gene panel of the known DCM genes. Our results underline the high analytical quality and feasibility of Next-Generation Sequencing in clinical genetic diagnostics and provide a sound database of the genetic causes of DCM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2015. Vol. 36, no 18, 1123-U43 p.
Keyword [en]
cardiomyopathy, genetics, patients, diagnosis
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-105259DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehu301ISI: 000354742800015PubMedID: 25163546OAI: diva2:824638
Available from: 2015-06-22 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2015-09-01Bibliographically approved

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Waldenström, AndersMörner, Stellan
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