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Growth Hormone Treatment Improves Cognitive Function in Short Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency
Gothenburg.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5456-2514
Uppsala.
Uppsala.
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2015 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 390-399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aims: We investigated the association between cognition and growth hormone (GH) status and GH treatment in short prepubertal children with broadly ranging GH secretion. Methods: A total of 99 children (age 3-11 years), 41 with GH deficiency (GHD) and 58 with idiopathic short stature (ISS), were randomized to a fixed dose (43 mu g/kg/day) or a prediction model-guided individualized dose (17-100 mu g/kg/day) and followed up for 24 months. In a longitudinal and mixed within-and between-subjects study, we examined clinical effect size changes, measured by Cohen's d, in full-scale IQ (FSIQ) and secondary IQ indices. Results: Significant increases giving medium effect size in FSIQ (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.63), performance IQ (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.65) and processing speed (p = 0.005, Cohen's d = 0.71) were found in the GH-deficient group. In contrast, perceptual organization only increased in the ISS group (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.53). Baseline IQ was normally distributed with small but significant differences between the groups: GH-deficient children had lower FSIQ (p = 0.042) and lower performance IQ (p = 0.021). Using multiple regression analysis, 40% of the variance in delta processing speed scores (0-24 months) was explained by GH(max) and IGF-I-SDS at baseline. Conclusion: IQ, specifically fluid intelligence, increased in the GH-deficient children. The pretreatment status of the GH/IGF-I axis was significantly predictive for these changes. (C) 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2015. Vol. 83, no 6, p. 390-399
Keywords [en]
Cognition, IQ, Insulin-like growth factor I, Short stature, Fluid intelligence, Idiopathic short stature
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106802DOI: 10.1159/000375529ISI: 000357834800003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-106802DiVA, id: diva2:846943
Available from: 2015-08-18 Created: 2015-08-07 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved

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Kriström, Berit

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