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Using the chicken embryo to assess virulence of Listeria monocytogenes and to model other microbial infections
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
2015 (English)In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 10, no 8, 1155-1164 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microbial infections are a global health problem, particularly as microbes are continually developing resistance to antimicrobial treatments. An effective and reliable method for testing the virulence of different microbial pathogens is therefore a useful research tool. This protocol describes how the chicken embryo can be used as a trustworthy, inexpensive, ethically desirable and quickly accessible model to assess the virulence of the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, which can also be extended to other microbial pathogens. We provide a step-by-step protocol and figures and videos detailing the method, including egg handling, infection strategies, pathogenicity screening and isolation of infected organs. From the start of incubation of the fertilized eggs, the protocol takes <4 weeks to complete, with the infection part taking only 3 d. We discuss the appropriate controls to use and potential adjustments needed for adapting the protocol for other microbial pathogens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2015. Vol. 10, no 8, 1155-1164 p.
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-107282DOI: 10.1038/nprot.2015.073ISI: 000358482200003PubMedID: 26134955OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-107282DiVA: diva2:849840
Available from: 2015-08-31 Created: 2015-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, ChristopherGripenland, JonasJohansson, Jörgen
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Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine)Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS)Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR)
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Nature Protocols
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)

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