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Aim for the Suprasternal Notch: Technical Note to Avoid Bowstringing after Deep Brain Stimulation
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London.
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2015 (English)In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 93, no 4, 227-230 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Bowstringing may occur when excessive fibrosis develops around extension cables in the neck after deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Though the occurrence of this phenomenon is rare, we have noted that it tends to cause maximal discomfort when the cables cross superficially over the convexity of the clavicle. We hypothesise that bowstringing may be avoided by directing the extension cables towards the suprasternal notch. Methods: When connecting DBS leads to an infraclavicular pectoral implantable pulse generator (IPG), tunnelling is directed towards the suprasternal I notch, before being directed laterally towards the IPG pocket. In previously operated patients with established fibrosis, the fibrous tunnel is opened and excised as far cranially as possible, allowing medial rerouting of cables. Using this approach, we reviewed our series of patients who underwent DBS surgery over 10 years. Results: In 429 patients, 7 patients (2%) with cables tunnelled over the convexity of the clavicle complaining of bowstringing underwent cable exploration and rerouting. This eliminated bowstringing and provided better cosmetic results. When the cable trajectory was initially directed towards the suprasternal notch, no bowstringing was observed. Conclusion:The tunnelling trajectory appears to influence postoperative incidence of fibrosis associated with DBS cables. Modifying the surgical technique may reduce the incidence of this troublesome adverse event. (C) 2015 S.Karger AG, Basel

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 93, no 4, 227-230 p.
Keyword [en]
Bowstringing, Deep brain stimulation, Implantable pulse generator
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108171DOI: 10.1159/000381680ISI: 000359392500001PubMedID: 25998245OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-108171DiVA: diva2:852432
Available from: 2015-09-09 Created: 2015-09-04 Last updated: 2017-05-10Bibliographically approved

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Hariz, Marwan I.

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