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The development of a localised HIV epidemic and the associated excess mortality burden in a rural area of South Africa
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Department of Population Health, Faculty of Epidemiology and Public Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. (Umeå Centre for Global Health Research)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0912-0984
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH) Network, Accra, Ghana. (Umeå Centre for Global Health Research)
University of the Witwatersrand.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH) Network, Accra, Ghana. (Umeå Centre for Global Health Research)
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2016 (English)In: Global Health, Epidemiology and Genomics, E-ISSN 2054-4200, Vol. 1, no e7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in South Africa rapidly developed into a major pandemic. Here we analyse the development of the epidemic in a rural area of the country. The data used were collected between 1992 and 2013 in a longitudinal population survey, the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance Study, in the northeast of the country. Throughout the period of study mortality rates were similar in all villages, suggesting that there were multiple index cases evenly spread geographically. These were likely to have been returning migrant workers. For those aged below 39 years the HIV mortality rate was higher for women, above this age it was higher for men. This indicates the protective effect of greater access to HIV testing and treatment among older women. The recent convergence of mortality rates for Mozambicans and South Africans indicates that the former refugee population are being assimilated into the host community. More than 60% of the deaths occurring in this community between 1992 and 2013 could be attributed directly or indirectly to HIV. Recently there has been an increasing level of non-HIV mortality which has important implications for local healthcare provision. This study demonstrates how evidence from longitudinal analyses can support healthcare planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 1, no e7
Keyword [en]
AIDS, epidemic, epidemiology, HIV, mortality, South Africa, Agincourt
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108613DOI: 10.1017/gheg.2016.3OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-108613DiVA: diva2:853721
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2006–1512Wellcome trust, 058893/Z/99/A; 069683/Z/02/Z; 085477/Z/08/Z
Note

Originally published in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-09-14 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2017-02-01Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Who died, where, when and why?: an investigation of HIV-related mortality in rural South Africa
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who died, where, when and why?: an investigation of HIV-related mortality in rural South Africa
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

South Africa has experienced the most severe consequences of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Every community has been affected in some way, many experiencing huge increases in mortality,particularly before antiretroviral therapies (ART) were readily available. However, the micro-level understanding of the HIV epidemic in South Africa is weak, because of a lack of detailed data for most of the population. This thesis is based on detailed individual follow-up in the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance Site (HDSS) located in the Agincourt subdistrict of Mpumalanga Province and investigates micro-level determinants of HIV epidemiology and the impact of treatment provided.

Methods

The Agincourt HDSS has followed a geographically defined population since 1992,approximately the time when the HIV/AIDS epidemic first became apparent. This population based surveillance has included capturing details of all deaths, with cause of death determined by verbal autopsy, as well as the geographical location of individual households within the overall Agincourt area. Background information on the roll-out of ART over time was also recorded.

Results

A comparison immediately before and after the major roll-out of ART showed a substantial decrease in HIV-related mortality, greater in some local communities within the area than others. Individual determinants associated with a decreased risk of HIV/AIDS mortality included proximity to ART services, as well as being female, younger, and in higher socioeconomic and educational strata. There was a decrease in the use of traditional healthcare sources and an increase in the use of biomedical healthcare amongst those dying of HIV/AIDS between periods before and after the roll-out of ART.

Conclusions

Understanding micro-level determinants of HIV/AIDS infection and mortality was very important in terms of characterising the overall epidemic in this community. This approach will enable public health interventions to be more effectively targeted towards those who need them most in the continuing evolution of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2015. 81 p.
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1736
Keyword
HIV, AIDS, Mortality, Determinants, Risk Factor, Spatial Epidemiology, Structural Determinant, Antiretroviral Therapy, Healthcare Access, South Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Traditional Medical Practitioner, Traditional Medicine, Tuberculosis, Health and Demographic Surveillance System, Global Health, Population Health, Epidemiology
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108610 (URN)978-91-7601-309-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-10-09, Room 135 Building 9A, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2006–1512Wellcome trust, 058893/Z/99/A; 069683/Z/02/Z; 085477/Z/08/Z
Available from: 2015-09-18 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2015-10-14Bibliographically approved

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