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The role of cities in Nordic regional development policy
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5434-7304
2015 (English)In: Firms' location selections and regional policy in the global economy / [ed] Toshiharu Ishikawa, Tokyo: Springer-Verlag Tokyo Inc., 2015, 141-161 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

'Modern regional policy,' the territorially directed policies developed after WWII represent only a subset of the measures a central power may use to direct development in its territory. The larger set of policies we denote 'Classical regional policy.' The policies developed in Nordic countries after 1950 could not promote a limited set of cities, although 'growth center policies' had been attempted with some success in France and the UK. Instead, tax and subsidy structures, support for investments, and transport subsidies directed towards less populated areas were favored. We argue that this choice was a result of the political processes in the Nordic welfare states. The attempts to implement growth pole strategies in the Nordic countries are discussed and analyzed in a context where unbalanced growth between regions is generic and the alternatives available to a national power in order not to lose control over its territory are made explicit. The attempts to implement a city-based growth pole-oriented regional policy in Norway, Sweden, and Finland are summarized. We find that such an explicit policy mostly is impossible within 'modern regional policy', but that the pitfalls of this policy in the 1980s led to the 'broad regional policy.' This policy has much in common with the classical policy. However, we also found that such a policy was, to some extent, actually formulated when the location of public facilities was decided.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tokyo: Springer-Verlag Tokyo Inc., 2015. 141-161 p.
Keyword [en]
Cities, Nordic, Regional policy, Growth poles, Sweden, Norway, Finland
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109626DOI: 10.1007/978-4-431-55366-3_9ISBN: 978-4-431-55365-6 (print)ISBN: 978-4-431-55366-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-109626DiVA: diva2:858382
Available from: 2015-10-02 Created: 2015-10-02 Last updated: 2015-12-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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More languages
Output format
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