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Dissection of the Functions of the IglC Protein of Francisella tularensis
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
2010 (English)In: The challenge of highly pathogenic microorganisms: mechanisms of virulence and novel medical countermeasures, Springer, 2010, 67-75 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Francisella tularensis harbors genes with similarity to genes encoding components of a type VI secretion system (T6SS). These include iglA and iglB, the homologues of which are conserved in T6SSs. They are part of the igl operon, also encompassing the iglC and iglD genes. We have used a yeast two-hybrid system to study the interaction of the Igl proteins of E tularensis LVS. Previously, we identified a region of IglA necessary for efficient binding to IglB as well as for IglAB protein stability and intra-macrophage growth with an essential role for a conserved alpha-helical region. Thus, IglA-IglB complex formation is clearly crucial for Francisella pathogenicity and the same interaction is conserved in other human pathogens. Herein, the interaction of IglC with other members of the operon was investigated. It showed no binding to the other members in the yeast two-hybrid assay and we found also that two cysteine residues, C191 and C192, predicted to be putative prenylation sites, played no role for the important contribution of IglC to the intracellular replication of E tularensis although C191 was important for the stability of the protein.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2010. 67-75 p.
Keyword [en]
Francisella, IglC, Yeast two-hybrid system, Cysteine residues
National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109871DOI: 10.1007/978-90-481-9054-6_7ISI: 000322847000007ISBN: 978-90-481-9053-9 (print)ISBN: 978-90-481-9054-6 (e-book) (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-109871DiVA: diva2:859537
Conference
46th Oholo Conference on the Challenge of Highly Pathogenic Microorganisms - Mechanisms of Virulence and Novel Medical Countermeasures, Eilat, Israel, October 25-29, 2009
Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2015-10-07Bibliographically approved

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Bröms, Jeanette ELavander, MoaSjöstedt, Anders
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