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Impact of probiotics during weaning on the metabolic and inflammatory profile: follow-up at school age
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, ISSN 0963-7486, E-ISSN 1465-3478, Vol. 66, no 6, 686-691 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We hypothesised that feeding the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19 (LF19) (dep. nr LMG P-17806) during weaning would program the metabolic and inflammatory profile and studied its association with previously assessed body composition. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 179 infants were randomised to daily feeding of cereals with or without LF19 10 8 CFU from 4 to 13 months of age. At age 8-9 years, 120 children were reassessed. Using high-sensitivity multiplex immunoassay technology and ELISA, we found that overweight/obese children had increased plasma C-peptide, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, leptin and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) after overnight fasting compared with normal weight children, independently of LF19. After excluding the obese, leptin and hsCRP were still increased, revealing an aberrant metabolic and inflammatory state already in overweight, pre-pubertal children. Higher body mass index z-score, sagittal abdominal diameter, truncal and total body fat % were associated with an aberrant metabolic and inflammatory profile, emphasising the need for early prevention strategies although no programming effect of LF19 was observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015. Vol. 66, no 6, 686-691 p.
Keyword [en]
body composition, children, inflammation, Lactobacillus paracasei ssp paracasei F19, metabolism, crobiota
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109965DOI: 10.3109/09637486.2015.1025717ISI: 000361335300012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-109965DiVA: diva2:859966
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Effects of early probiotic supplementation in a pediatric setting: Focus on body composition, metabolism and inflammation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of early probiotic supplementation in a pediatric setting: Focus on body composition, metabolism and inflammation
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We aimed to determine the short- and long-term effects on growth, body composition, metabolic and inflammatory markers following supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19 (LF19) during weaning. Methods: One-hundred and seventy-nine healthy, infants in Umeå city, Västerbotten County were randomised to daily intake of cereals with (n=89) or without (n=90) LF19 108 colony-forming units from 4 to 13 months of age. Weight, length, head circumference and body composition, assessed by skinfold thickness, were examined at 4, 5.5, 6.5, 9, 12 and 13 months of age. Venous blood was drawn at 5.5 and 13 months. In all, 171 infants completed the intervention and were invited to a follow-up at 8-9 years of age between 2009 and 2011, 120 children participated. Weight, height, sagittal abdominal diameter and body composition (using Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry-scan) were measured. Data on weight and height at 4 years were collected from medical records. The families filled out a 4-day food record and a food frequency questionnaire, physical activity was assessed using a pedometer for 7 days. At 5.5, 13 months and 8-9 years of age we analysed the serum blood lipid profile. At 8-9 years fasting glucose, insulin, aspartate and alanine transaminases were analysed in serum. Homeostatic Model Assessment index was calculated. At follow-up serum adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and plasma C-peptide, ghrelin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon, insulin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, resistin and visfatin were analysed. For characterisation of the plasma metabolome, a subgroup (n=40) was analysed at 5.5 and 13 months of age by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) analysis and in all (n=112) children at the follow-up using untargeted GC-GC/MS. Results: There were no differences between the LF19 and placebo group regarding body weight, length/height at any assessment from 4 months to 8-9 years of age; nor were there any differences between the groups in body composition. In the LF19 group 19 % were overweight/obese, the corresponding number was 21 % in the placebo group (p=0.78). Analysed metabolic and inflammatory markers, both during the intervention and the follow-up did not differ between the two groups. At 13 months of age lower levels of palmitic acid and palmitoleic acid (both p<0.04) and higher levels of putrescine (p<0.01) were seen in the LF19 compared to the placebo group. These differences did not persist at 8-9 years of age. At that age, we found statistically stronger models when comparing overweight/obese and normal weight children as well as in relation to sex. Conclusion: Early intervention with the probiotic LF19 at the time of weaning exerted transient effects on the metabolome. In a long-term perspective, we found neither benefit nor harm on growth, body composition, metabolic or inflammatory markers following supplementation with LF19 during weaning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2016. 71 p.
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1785
Keyword
Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19, infants, children, growth, body composition, metabolism, follow-up
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119835 (URN)978-91-7601-425-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-05-20, Sal E04, målpunkt R-1 (by 6E), Biomedicin, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 13:00 (English)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2016-04-29Bibliographically approved

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Karlsson Videhult, FridaAndersson, YvonneÖhlund, IngerStenlund, HansHernell, OlleWest, Christina E

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International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
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