umu.sePublications
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Long telomeres are associated with clonality in wild populations of the fissiparous starfish Coscinasterias tenuispina
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Heredity, ISSN 0018-067X, E-ISSN 1365-2540, Vol. 115, no 5, 437-443 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Telomeres usually shorten during an organism's lifespan and have thus been used as an aging and health marker. When telomeres become sufficiently short, senescence is induced. The most common method of restoring telomere length is via telomerase reverse transcriptase activity, highly expressed during embryogenesis. However, although asexual reproduction from adult tissues has an important role in the life cycles of certain species, its effect on the aging and fitness of wild populations, as well as its implications for the long-term survival of populations with limited genetic variation, is largely unknown. Here we compare relative telomere length of 58 individuals from four populations of the asexually reproducing starfish Coscinasterias tenuispina. Additionally, 12 individuals were used to compare telomere lengths in regenerating and non-regenerating arms, in two different tissues (tube feet and pyloric cecum). The level of clonality was assessed by genotyping the populations based on 12 specific microsatellite loci and relative telomere length was measured via quantitative PCR. The results revealed significantly longer telomeres in Mediterranean populations than Atlantic ones as demonstrated by the Kruskal-Wallis test (K=24.17, significant value: P-value <0.001), with the former also characterized by higher levels of clonality derived from asexual reproduction. Telomeres were furthermore significantly longer in regenerating arms than in non-regenerating arms within individuals (pyloric cecum tissue: Mann-Whitney test, V=299, P-value <10(-6); and tube feet tissue Student's t=2.28, P-value = 0.029). Our study suggests that one of the mechanisms responsible for the long-term somatic maintenance and persistence of clonal populations is telomere elongation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 115, no 5, 437-443 p.
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110987DOI: 10.1038/hdy.2015.43ISI: 000362824300006PubMedID: 25990879OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-110987DiVA: diva2:872287
Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2015-11-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Degerman, Sofie
By organisation
Department of Medical Biosciences
In the same journal
Heredity
Evolutionary Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 44 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link