umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Mental health and parenthood: a longitudinal study of the relationship between self-reported mental health and parenthood
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
2015 (English)In: Health Sociology Review, ISSN 1446-1242, E-ISSN 1839-3551, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 283-296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

According to previous studies, the relationship between parenthood and mental health is not straightforward. One reason could be that selection effects on parenthood are seldom accounted for. Using the unique Northern Swedish Cohort dataset, following individuals from age 16 to 43 (n=1001), this study examines whether there is a selection effect of self-reported mental health in adolescence into parenthood; and whether entry into parenthood is related to subsequent mental health after controlling for prior mental health. Our results show no evidence of a selection effect for women, but men with poor mental health at age 16 were less likely to become fathers. Having children improved women's subsequent mental health after controlling for adolescent mental health, something that was not true for men. Our result reinforces the need for future research of the complex relationship between mental health and parenthood through focusing on, for example, timing of parenthood as well as through using different mental health measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015. Vol. 24, no 3, p. 283-296
Keywords [en]
family formation, mental health, health selection, longitudinal, sociology, Sweden
National Category
Sociology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111500DOI: 10.1080/14461242.2015.1051079ISI: 000363309500005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-111500DiVA, id: diva2:878473
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Who becomes a teenage parent?: life course perspectives on selection into teenage motherhood and fatherhood trajectories in Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who becomes a teenage parent?: life course perspectives on selection into teenage motherhood and fatherhood trajectories in Sweden
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background. The aim of the research described in thesis is to study processes of selection leading to teenage parenthood in contemporary Sweden. I ask how factors related to socio-economic position, mental health issues in youth, and family formation behaviour of previous generations directs young individuals into teenage parent trajectories. Having children as a teenager is often seen as a burden and a failure, and framed as a public health concern. This is true, even as mounting evidence points to the fact that the connections between teenage parenthood and future adverse outcomes are muddled by selection effects. This research makes a contribution to the body of knowledge by looking at how several factors influence selection processes, namely socio-economic background factors, mental health issues in adolescence and family formation patterns of the teenage parent’s own parents. Both teenage mothers and teenage fathers are considered from a life course perspective. The theoretical framework also draws on the literature relating to opportunity costs and competing alternatives.

Method. Two longitudinal data sources are utilized: register population data accessed through the Umeå SIMSAM lab and the Northern Swedish Cohort survey. In order to answer questions about both selection leading into events and trajectories, random intercept models for longitudinal data as well as sequence analysis are applied.

Results. The results show that, apart from confirming the continued importance of socio-economic factors selecting young men and women to become teenage parents and embark on teenage parenthood trajectories, mental health issues in youth are also important. Through this route, both teenage girls and boys enter into teenage parenthood in a way that does not happen with on-time parenthood. Furthermore, the results show that selection not only affects the chances of becoming a teenage parent, but also which type of teenage parent trajectory the individual follows. Moreover, the results reveal that these trajectories, and not only the event of becoming a teenage parent, are repeated over generations. The results illustrate that teenage parents are a heterogeneous group with diverse backgrounds and selection processes, and hence policy measures aimed at teenage parents should not try to offer blanket solutions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2017. p. 48
Series
Akademiska avhandlingar vid Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, ISSN 1104-2508 ; 79
Keywords
teenage parenthood, life course, longitudinal, mental health, family, selection effects
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142111 (URN)978-91-7601-799-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-12-15, Hörsal E, Humanisthuset, Umeå, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Kalucza, SaraHammarström, AnneNilsson, Karina

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kalucza, SaraHammarström, AnneNilsson, Karina
By organisation
Department of SociologySocial medicine
In the same journal
Health Sociology Review
SociologyPublic Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 321 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf