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Health and ageing in Nairobi's informal settlements-evidence from the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH): a cross sectional study
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0556-1483
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
2015 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, 1231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Much of the focus on population ageing has been in high-income counties. Relatively less attention is given to the world's poorest region, Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) where children and adolescents still comprise a high proportion of the population. Yet the number of adults aged 60-plus in SSA is already twice that in northern Europe. In addition, SSA is experiencing massive rural to urban migration with consequent expansion of informal urban settlements, or slums, whose health problems are usually unrecognised and not addressed. This study aims to improve understanding of functional health and well-being in older adult slum-dwellers in Nairobi (Kenya).

METHODS: The study sample comprised men and women, aged 50 years and over, living in Korogocho and Viwandani, Nairobi, Kenya (n = 1,878). Data from the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH) and the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE Wave 1) were analysed. The prevalence of poor self-reported quality of life (QoL) and difficulties in domain-specific function is estimated by age and sex. Logistic regression investigates associations between difficulties in the domains of function and poor QoL, adjusting for age, sex and socio-demographic factors. Statistical significance is set at P<0.05.

RESULTS: Women reported poorer QoL and greater functional difficulties than men in all domains except self-care. In the multivariable logistic regression the odds of poor QoL among respondents with problems or difficulties in relation to affect (OR = 7.0; 95%CI = 3.0-16.0), pain/discomfort (OR = 3.6; 95%CI = 2.3-5.8), cognition (OR = 1.8; 95 %CI = 1.2-2.9) and mobility (OR = 1.8; 95%CI = 1.1-2.8) were statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings underscore differences in the domains of functional health that encapsulate women and men's capacities to perform regular activities and the impact of poor functioning on QoL. Investing in the health and QoL of older people in SSA will be crucial in helping the region to realise key development goals and in opening opportunities for improved health outcomes and sustainable economic development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 15, 1231
Keyword [en]
Functional health, Domains of health, Quality of life, Informal settlements, Slums, Ageing, Aging, Nairobi, Kenya, Africa
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112840DOI: 10.1186/s12889-015-2556-xISI: 000366103500001PubMedID: 26652252OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-112840DiVA: diva2:882909
Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Ng, NawiStewart Williams, Jennifer

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