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Demographic outcomes during colonisation: Migration and mortality among indigenous and non-indigenous populations in nineteenth-century Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). (Arcum)
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0180-5762
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7559-2571
2016 (English)In: Journal of Migration History, ISSN 2351-9916, Vol. 2, no 1, 148-176 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to insufficient historical population data, there is limited knowledge about the demographic outcomes of colonisation. This study provides demographic evidence of the difficulties faced by the Sami – an indigenous population in Sweden – during nineteenth-century colonisation, as indicated by (1) high risks of migration and (2) low survival rates compared to non-Sami. The digitised parish registers of the Demographic Data Base (Umeå University) provide longitudinal, individual-level data on migration, mortality, and ethnic origin. Event history analysis reveals that the Sami were vulnerable, with a higher mortality rate than non-Sami, and that they were more prone to migrate from areas overcrowded due to an increased competition for land. However, regardless of ethnic origin, it was primarily the settlers who migrated, and who ran the lowest mortality risks. This result suggests a ‘healthy settler effect’, and diverse consequences of colonisation that did not always follow ethnic lines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brill Academic Publishers, 2016. Vol. 2, no 1, 148-176 p.
Keyword [en]
colonisation, demography, ethnicity, indigenous, migration, mortality, nineteenth century, Sami
National Category
History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118615DOI: 10.1163/23519924-00201006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-118615DiVA: diva2:914491
Available from: 2016-03-24 Created: 2016-03-24 Last updated: 2017-02-10Bibliographically approved

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Vikström, LottaMarklund, EmilSandström, Glenn
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Department of historical, philosophical and religious studiesCentre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR)Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS)
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf