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Effect of bioconcentration and trophic transfer on realized exposure to oxazepam in 2 predators, the dragonfly larvae (Aeshna grandis) and the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis)
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
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2016 (English)In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 35, no 4, 930-937 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

Psychoactive substances are used worldwide and constitute one of the most common groups of pharmaceutical contaminants in surface waters. Although these pharmaceuticals are designed to be efficiently eliminated from the human body, very little is known about their trophic-transfer potential in aquatic wildlife. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to quantify and compare uptake of an anxiolytic (oxazepam) from water (bioconcentration) and via the consumption of contaminated diet (trophic transfer) in 2 common freshwater predators: Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and the dragonfly larvae Aeshna grandis. Bioconcentration and trophic transfer of oxazepam were found in both predator species. However, higher bioconcentrations were observed for perch (bioconcentration factor [BCF], 3.7) than for dragonfly larvae (BCF, 0.5). Perch also retained more oxazepam from consumed prey (41%) than dragonfly larvae (10%), whereas the relative contribution via prey consumption was 14% and 42% for perch and dragonflies, respectively. In addition, bioconcentration was negatively correlated with perch weight, indicating that exposure levels in natural contaminated environments differ between individuals of different size or between different developmental stages. Hence, trophic transfer of pharmaceuticals may indeed occur, and estimates of environmental exposures that do not consider intake via food or size-dependent bioconcentration may therefore lead to wrongful estimations of realized exposure levels in natural contaminated ecosystems. (C) 2016 SETAC

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 35, no 4, 930-937 p.
Keyword [en]
Benzodiazepine, Pharmaceutical pollution, Trophic transfer, Perca fluviatilis, Dragonfly larvae, Bioconcentration
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119268DOI: 10.1002/etc.3368ISI: 000372490300019PubMedID: 26762222OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-119268DiVA: diva2:932967
Available from: 2016-06-02 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2016-06-02Bibliographically approved

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Heynen, MartinaFick, JerkerJonsson, MicaelKlaminder, JonatanBrodin, Tomas
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Department of Ecology and Environmental SciencesDepartment of Chemistry
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