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Ambient temperature as a trigger of preterm delivery in a temperate climate
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that elevated ambient temperatures may trigger preterm delivery. Since results from studies in temperate climates are inconclusive, we investigated the association between temperature and the risk of preterm birth in Flanders (Belgium).

METHODS: We used data on 807 835 singleton deliveries (January 1998-July 2011). We combined a quasi-Poisson model with distributed lag non-linear models to allow for delayed and non-linear temperature effects, accounting for the daily pregnancies at risk and their gestational age distribution.

RESULTS: For moderate heat (95th vs 50th centile) up to 1 day before delivery (lag 0-1), the risk of preterm birth increased by 8.5% (95% CI 2.4% to 15.0%) when minimum temperature increased from 8.3°C to 16.3°C and by 9.6% (95% CI 1.1% to 18.7%) when maximum temperature increased from 14.7°C to 26.5°C. Corresponding estimates for extreme heat (99th vs 50th centile) were 15.6% (95% CI 4.8% to 27.6%) for minimum temperature (19.0°C vs 8.3°C) and 14.5% (95% CI 0.5% to 30.6%) for maximum temperature (30.7°C vs 14.7°C). Despite the increased risk of preterm birth associated with cold at lag 2 (and lag 1 for minimum temperature), cumulative cold effects were small. The per cent change in preterm birth associated with moderate cold (5th vs 50th centile) up to 3 days before delivery (lag 0-3) was 2.1% (95% CI -4.1% to 8.7%) for minimum temperature (-2.0°C vs 8.3°C) and 0.6% (95% CI -7.3% to 9.2%) for maximum temperature (2.5°C vs 14.7°C).

CONCLUSIONS: Even in a temperate climate, ambient temperature may trigger preterm delivery, suggesting that pregnant women should avoid temperature extremes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121683DOI: 10.1136/jech-2015-206384PubMedID: 27261529OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-121683DiVA: diva2:933620
Available from: 2016-06-07 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2016-08-05Bibliographically approved

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Vicedo-Cabrera, Ana M.Forsberg, Bertil
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