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Is outdoor work associated with elevated rates of cerebrovascular disease mortality?: a cohort study based on iron-ore mining
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (Arcum)
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, ISSN 1745-6673, E-ISSN 1745-6673, Vol. 11, 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: A cohort study that examined iron ore mining found negative associations between cumulative working time employed underground and several outcomes, including mortality of cerebrovascular diseases. In this cohort study, and using the same group of miners, we examined whether work in an outdoor environment could explain elevated cerebrovascular disease rates.

METHODS: This study was based on a Swedish iron ore mining cohort consisting of 13,000 workers. Poisson regression models were used to generate smoothed estimates of standardized mortality ratios and adjusted rate ratios, both models by cumulative exposure time in outdoor work.

RESULTS: The adjusted rate ratio between employment classified as outdoor work ≥25 years and outdoor work 0-4 years was 1.62 (95 % CI 1.07-2.42). The subgroup underground work ≥15 years deviated most in occurrence of cerebrovascular disease mortality compared with the external reference population: SMR (0.70 (95 % CI 0.56-0.85)).

CONCLUSIONS: Employment in outdoor environments was associated with elevated rates of cerebrovascular disease mortality. In contrast, work in tempered underground employment was associated with a protecting effect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 11, 40
Keyword [en]
Poisson regression, Occupation, Standardized mortality ratio, Mortality, Cohort study, Mining
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125120DOI: 10.1186/s12995-016-0131-8ISI: 000384698600001PubMedID: 27570536OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-125120DiVA: diva2:958133
Available from: 2016-09-06 Created: 2016-09-06 Last updated: 2016-12-21Bibliographically approved

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