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Mobilising Labour in Remote ‘Boom’ Towns for Economic Diversification: The case of Tennant Creek, Australia
Northern Institute, CDU and Flinders University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8143-123X
University of South Australia, Northern Institute, CDU.
2013 (English)In: Inner Asia Studies in the Humanities, Vol. 2, 31-44 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New economic opportunities in remote areas are often linked to major private and public sector investment projects which are controlled by external decision-makers and lead to temporary periods of economic ‘boom’. Settlements in sparsely populated or remote areas in countries such as Australia, Canada, the United States and the Arctic European nations, are commonly perceived to be inherently disadvantaged socially and economically because of their isolation from social services, economic and political power centres [Carson et al., 2011; Huskey, 2011]. Even when economic opportunities present for a number of remote locations as a result of the mineral and oil and gas resources ‘booms’, the benefits are believed to accrue primarily to distant large urban centres where resource extraction companies are based [Argent, 2013]. Income derived from employment in the resources sector is channelled away from sparsely populated areas by the use of non-resident and temporarily resident labour, with little in the way of local employment [Carrington and Pereira, 2011]. Through a series of case studies of small settlements in remote parts of Alaska, Huskey (2011) demonstrated that local engagement in various economic activities is possible and can deliver local social and economic benefit. This research examines Husky’s arguments about the potential for sustainable local economic development through a case study of a small and isolated settlement, Tennant Creek, in Australia’s Northern Territory. By analysing local labour changes from 2001 to 2011, the research examined the town’s capacity to mobilise its labour force and diversify in response to new opportunities offered by a range of economic ‘booms’ in the mining, construction, transport, tourism, health, education and government service sectors. This brief is a summary of a full research paper which is published in the journal Bulletin Buryat State University: Inner Asia Studies in the Humanities (Carson & Carson, 2013).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 2, 31-44 p.
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125322OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-125322DiVA: diva2:967924
Available from: 2016-09-10 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2016-11-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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More languages
Output format
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