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Indigenous health and community services employment in remote Northern Territory: a baseline examination of 2006 and 2011 Census data
School of Medicine, Flinders University, Nuriootpa, South Australia; The Northern Institute,Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8143-123X
2011 (English)In: The Australian journal of rural health, ISSN 1038-5282, E-ISSN 1440-1584, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 255-258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To establish a baseline of levels of Indigenous professional engagement in the health and community services sector in remote Northern Territory.

Design: Analysis of data from 2001 and 2006 Census.

Setting: Northern Territory – Balance Statistical Division.

Participants: Persons employed in health and community services sector in 2006.

Main outcome measures: Indigenous status, level of education, current education status, occupation type and residential mobility.

Results: Indigenous employment grew by 137% between 2001 and 2006. In 2006, 42% of Indigenous employees were labourers and 9% professionals, in contrast to non‐Indigenous workers of whom 41% were professionals and 5% labourers. Over 50% of workers who moved into the region between 2001 and 2006 were professionals, compared with 20% of those who had remained in the region. Indigenous in‐migrants were twice as likely as Indigenous people who had stayed in the region to be professionals. Indigenous workers were much less likely to have post‐school educational qualifications than non‐Indigenous workers. Indigenous workers were also less likely to be studying for a post‐school qualification. Indigenous in‐migrants were three times as likely to have post‐school qualifications than Indigenous people who had remained in the region and were also more likely to be enrolled in post‐school education.

Conclusions: The baseline is low Indigenous engagement as professional labour, and low Indigenous engagement in formal education. Mobile Indigenous people have higher levels of engagement. The situation might be addressed by increased formal education in remote areas and increased mobility of Indigenous health labour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2011. Vol. 19, no 5, p. 255-258
Keywords [en]
Indigenous health, professional mobil-ity, professional pathway, remote health education
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125302DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2011.01220.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-125302DiVA, id: diva2:967943
Available from: 2016-09-10 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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