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  • 1. Abeli, Thomas
    et al.
    Orsenigo, Simone
    Guzzon, Filippo
    Fae, Matteo
    Balestrazzi, Alma
    Carlsson-Graner, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Mueller, Jonas V.
    Mondoni, Andrea
    Geographical pattern in the response of the arctic-alpine Silene suecica (Cariophyllaceae) to the interaction between water availability and photoperiod2015In: Ecological research, ISSN 0912-3814, E-ISSN 1440-1703, Vol. 30, no 2, 327-335 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We hypothesized a geographical pattern of the plant performance (seedling development, biomass production, relative water content and chlorophyll content) as a result of response to the interaction between photoperiod and water availability in populations of the arctic-alpine Silene suecica from different latitudes, thus experiencing different photoperiods during the growing season. Particularly, we expected a lower drought sensitivity in northern compared to southern populations as a consequence of harsher conditions experienced by the northern populations in terms of water availability. The experiment was carried out under common garden conditions, manipulating the water availability (wet and dry) and the photoperiod (21 and 16 h). We found an interaction between photoperiod and water availability on plant height, leaves, growth, biomass and total chlorophyll. However, the photoperiod neither counteracted nor intensified the effect of drought. Plants exposed to drought compensated for decreasing water availability by reducing their shoot growth. Changes in the chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a/b ratio were observed. Northern populations showed a higher basal growth performance and a greater response to the changed water regime (from wet to dry) than the southern populations. Southern populations showed a reduced ability to respond to drought, but their low basal performance may be advantageous under low water availability, avoiding water loss. In contrast, northern populations showed a stronger plastic response that limited the negative effects of reduced water availability. This study highlights the possibility that the plant response to environmental constraints (specifically water availability) may follow a geographical pattern.

  • 2.
    Ahlgren, Gunnel
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Evolution (Limnology), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vrede, Tobias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Goedkoop, Willem
    Department of Environmental Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fatty Acid Ratios in Freshwater Fish, Zooplankton and Zoobenthos - Are There Specific Optima?2009In: Lipids in Aquatic Ecosystems / [ed] Martin Kainz, Michael T. Brett, Michael T. Arts, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2009, 147-178 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two groups of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), termed omega-3 and omega-6 in food (or here as n-3 and n-6 PUFA, respectively), are essential for all vertebrates and probably also for nearly all invertebrates. The absolute concentrations of the different PUFA are important, as is an appropriate balance between the two. The optimal ratio of n-3/n-6 is not known for most organisms but is anticipated to be more or less species-specific (Sargent et al. 1995). The three most important PUFA in vertebrates are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6). Both EPA and ARA are precursors for biologically active eicosanoids that are vital components of cell membranes and play many dynamic roles in mediating and controlling a wide array of cellular activities (Crawford et al. 1989; Harrison 1990; Henderson et al. 1996; see Chap. 9). Since n-3 and n-6 PUFA cannot be synthesized de novo by most metazoans, they must be included in the diet, either as EPA, DHA and ARA, or as their precursors, such as α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3, precursor of EPA and DHA) and linoleic acid (LIN, 18:2n-6, precursor of ARA) (Bell et al. 1986; Sargent et al. 1995). Both ALA and LIN are produced in the thylacoid membranes of algae and plants with chlorophyll (Sargent at al. 1987).

  • 3.
    Ahlinder, Jon
    et al.
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mathisen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Elin
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mats
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Thelaus, Johanna
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oligotyping reveals divergent responses of predation resistant bacteria to aquatic productivity and plankton compositionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Predation-resistance has been suggested to be a key for persistence of pathogenic bacteria in aquatic environments. Little is known about driving factors for different types of protozoa resistant bacteria (PRB). We studied if presence of PRB is linked to specific plankton taxa, the aquatic nutrient state, or predation pressure on bacteria. Nineteen freshwater systems were sampled and analyzed for PRB, plankton composition and physicochemical variables. Three PRB genera were identified; Pseudomonas, Mycobacterium and Rickettsia. Use of minimum entropy decomposition algorithm and phylogenetic analysis showed that different nodes (representing OTUs of high taxonomic resolution) matched to environmental isolates of the three genera. Links between the PRB genera and specific plankton taxa were found, but showed different relationships depending on if 18S rRNA OTU or microscopy data were used in the analysis. Mycobacterium spp. was negatively correlated to aquatic nutrient state, while Pseudomonas showed the opposite pattern. Rickettsia spp. was positively related to predation pressure on bacteria. Both Mycobacterium and Rickettsia were more abundant in systems with high eukaryotic diversity, while Pseudomonas occurred abundantly in waters with low prokaryotic diversity. The different drivers may be explained by varying ecological strategies, where Mycobacterium and Rickettsia are slow growing and have an intracellular life style, while Pseudomonas is fast growing and opportunistic. Here we give an insight to the possibilities of newly advanced methods such as sequencing and oligotyping to link potential pathogens with biomarkers. This as a tool to assist predictions of the occurrence and persistence of environmental pathogens.

  • 4.
    Ahlm, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Prey specialization and diet of frogs in Borneo2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies of the diet of frogs indicate that most adult frogs are mainly insectivorous. Overall, frogs are viewed more as generalists than specialists in terms of their diet. However, despite earlier studies, there are still gaps in our knowledge regarding what frogs tend to eat and the degree of specialization. The aim of this study was to investigate the diet choice of frogs in a tropical ecosystem. The present study was conducted in a well-known hotspot for frogs with 66 of the 156 known frog species in Borneo found in a protected area comprising of primary rainforest.

     

    Frogs were caught in the field and their stomachs were flushed. The stomach content was retrieved, sorted to prey categories, and the diet analysed. In addition, the frogs were identified to species level. The frogs belonged to five families: Bufonidae, Dicroglossidae, Megophryidae, Microhylidae and Ranidae. My results show that the most common food source was ants, which constituted 63.7 % of the total food for all studied frog families. Termites, beetles and spiders made up 11.7 %, 4.2 % and 2.8 % of the total prey, respectively. The results from the analysis of Shannon’s diversity index supported two diet specialist families, the Bufonidae and Megophridae, which had a significantly lower mean diversity index compared to the generalist Dicroglossidae. To better reveal differences in frog’s diet in this ecosystem, further studies using larger sample size are needed.

     

     

     

  • 5.
    Ajaikumar, Samikannu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Larsson, William
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Shchukarev, Andrey
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Kordas, K
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Piispankatu 8, FIN-20500, Turku/Åbo, Finland.
    Oxidation of α-pinene over gold containing bimetallic nanoparticles supported on reducible TiO2 by DPU method2011In: Applied Catalysis A: General, ISSN 0926-860X, E-ISSN 1873-3875, Vol. 392, no 1-2, 11-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of bimetallic catalysts Au–M (where M = Cu, Co and Ru) were supported on a reducible TiO2 oxide via deposition-precipitation (DP) method with a slow decomposition of urea as the precipitating agent. The characteristic structural features of the prepared materials were characterized by various physico-chemical techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XPS results indicated the formation of alloyed bimetallic particles on the TiO2 support. TEM results confirmed the fine dispersion of metal nanoparticles on the support with an average particle size in the range of 3–5 nm. An industrially important process, oxy-functionalization of α-pinene was carried out over the prepared bimetallic heterogeneous catalysts under liquid phase conditions. Reaction parameters such as the reaction time, temperature, and the effect of solvent were studied for optimal conversion of α-pinene into verbenone. The major products obtained were verbenone, verbenol, α-pinene oxide and alkyl-pinene peroxide. The activity of the catalysts followed the order; AuCu/TiO2 > AuCo/TiO2 > Cu/TiO2 > Au/TiO2 > AuRu/TiO2. Upon comparison of the various catalysts, AuCu/TiO2 was found to be an active and selective catalyst towards the formation of verbenone. The temperature, nature of the catalysts and the choice of solvents greatly influenced the reaction rate.

  • 6.
    Albertsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Trophic interactions involving mysid shrimps (Mysidacea) in the near-bottom habitat in the Baltic Sea2004In: Aquatic Ecology, ISSN 1386-2588, E-ISSN 1573-5125, Vol. 38, no 3, 457-469 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a six month mesocosm tank experiment, hypotheses were tested concerning the role of benthopelagic mysid shrimps (Mysidacea) in the near-bottom food web of the Bothnian Sea, in the northern Baltic Sea. The first hypothesis tested was that the mysids interact, through predation, with benthic deposit-feeding Monoporeia affinis amphipods. A second hypothesis tested was that the sediment type is important for the overwintering success of the mysids. Changes in abundance and mass were recorded for M. affinis and mysids when separate and when coexisting, in two sediment types differing in organic content (food level); soft muddy clay (rich) and fine sand (poor). Despite the fact that newborn M. affinis offspring, a plausible target for predation by mysids, were present in substantial numbers in the tanks, no consistent evidence for any interaction between these taxa was found. The biomass of mysids was slightly higher in the muddy clay than in the sand tanks, and the mechanism behind this substrate effect is discussed. A third hypothesis, that the mysids interact with near-bottom zooplankton, was investigated. The tanks were continually supplied with in situ near-bottom sea-water containing a seminatural assemblage of near-bottom plankton. As a result of mysid predation, tanks with mysids had lower abundance and biomass of cyclopoid copepods than tanks without mysids. Thus, the major interaction found was predation on near-bottom zooplankton by mysids and it is suggested that this interaction could potentially be an important food link, especially during periods with low food availability in the pelagic system.

  • 7.
    Albertsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Uppföljning av naturtypen 1140 blottade ler- och sandbottnar i Bottenviken och Södra Östersjön: En pilotstudie2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Albertsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Leonardsson, K
    Deposit-feeding amphipods (Monoporeia affinis) reduce the recruitment of copepod nauplii from benthic resting eggs in the northern Baltic Sea2001In: Marine Biology, ISSN 0025-3162, E-ISSN 1432-1793, Vol. 138, no 4, 793-801 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally investigated the effect of different densities of the burrowing, deposit-feeding amphipod Monoporeia affinis on the recruitment of zooplankton from benthic resting eggs. Intact sediment cores with in situ density and species composition of zooplankton resting eggs and benthic fauna were collected in the northern Bothnian Sea, part of the Baltic Sea. We removed as many M, affinis as possible from the cores and then added different numbers of ill. affinis to the cores to generate a range of densities. The cores were exposed to different densities of M. affinis for either 3 or 40 days, after which the hatched zooplankton was registered. One subset of the cores were initially incubated under low temperature (2-3 degreesC, to prevent hatching) for 37 days (the resting phase), to allow for effects of M. affinis on unhatched resting eggs. These cores were then incubated under higher temperature (13 degreesC) for 3 days (the hatching phase), to induce hatching and allow for effects on hatching or hatched specimens. In a second subset of cores with the same time and temperature schedule, the M. affinis density was experimentally reduced at the start of the hatching phase, to evaluate the effect of M. affinis during the hatching phase. To a third subset of cores, we immediately initiated the hatching phase, without an experimental resting phase, to evaluate the effects induced during the resting phase. The most common zooplankton species that hatched was Eurytemora affinis (Copepoda), followed by Bosmina longispina maritima (Cladocera). In all cores that were subjected to a resting phase, the numbers of hatched E. affinis were log-linearly negatively related to density of M. affinis. An increase of M. affinis density from 1,000 to 5,000 individuals m(-2), normal field densities, reduced the hatching by 60-70%. The negative impact was mainly exerted during the hatching phase, suggesting predation on, burial of or physical injury of hatching nauplii or eggs in a late development stage as likely mechanisms. Also, the number of B. longispina maritima that hatched was reduced by M. affinis during the hatching phase, but no clear relation to density of M. affinis could be identified. The results show that M. affinis can reduce recruitment to zooplankton from benthic resting eggs. Such impact by the benthos on resting stages of zooplankton is therefore a potentially significant link between the benthic and pelagic systems.

  • 9.
    Albertsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Leonardsson, K
    Impact of a borrowing deposit-feeder, Monoporeia affinis, on viable zooplankton resting eggs in the northern Baltic Sea2000In: Marine Biology, ISSN 0025-3162, E-ISSN 1432-1793, Vol. 136, no 4, 611-619 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the effect of different densities of the burrowing deposit-feeding amphipod Monoporeia affinis on the potential for recruitment of zooplankton from benthic resting eggs. Hatching of resting eggs was induced in the laboratory on sliced and resuspended 1-cm depth-sections of sediment cores, collected at six stations ill an archipelago area of the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea. The uppermost 5 cm of the sediment was studied. The most common species that hatched was Eurytemor affinis (Copepoda). Individuals from another copepod genus, Acartia, hatched in significant numbers only in the cores from two stations with low amphipod abundance. Cores from stations with high amphipod densities showed a deeper distribution of emerging E. affinis nauplii compared with stations with few amphipods: the oxidised sediment layer was also deeper at high M. affinis densities than at low. Total (0 to 5 cm strata pooled) number of hatched E. affinis nauplii was independent of amphipod density. This indicates that the effect of M. affinis on E. affinis eggs involves deeper burial due to bioturbation, rather than predation. Decreased benthic recruitment of zooplankton at localities with high M. affinis density is suggested, since more deeply positioned eggs are less likely to hatch. When hatching was induced in intact, non-sliced cores from one station, the number of E. affinis nauplii that hatched was on average 43% of the number that hatched in the upper centimetre of the sliced cores from the same station. This fraction (43%), if applied to the other stations, implied a potential for benthic recruitment of up to 80000 ind m(-2) for E. affinis. Due to its high abundance, M. affinis is likely to greatly reduce benthic recruitment of zooplankton in this system.

  • 10.
    Alewell, C
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Geosciences, University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Giesler, Reiner
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Klaminder, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Leifeld, J
    Agroscope Reckenholz-Tänikon Research Station ART, Switzerland.
    Rollog, M
    Institute of Environmental Geosciences, University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats2011In: Biogeoscience Discussions, ISSN 1810-6277, Vol. 8, no 1, 527-548 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palsa peats are unique northern ecosystems formed under an arctic climate and characterizedby an unique biodiversity and ecology. The stability of the palsas are seriouslythreatened by climate warming which will change the permafrost dynamic and5 results in degradation of the mires. We used stable carbon isotope depth profiles intwo palsa mires of Northern Sweden to track environmental change during the formationof the mires. Carbon isotope (13C) depth profile of the yet undisturbed mireStorflaket indicated very low to no degradation of the peat in the water saturated depressions(hollows) but increased rates of anaerobic degradation at the Stordalen site.10 The latter might be induced by degradation of the permafrost cores in the uplifted areas(hummocks) and subsequent braking and submerging of the hummock peat intothe hollows due to climate warming. Carbon isotope depth profiles of hummocks indicateda turn from aerobic mineralisation to anaerobic degradation at a peat depthbetween 4 to 25 cm. The age of these turning point was 14C dated between 150 and15 670 years and could thus not be caused by anthropogenically induced climate change.We found the uplifting of the hummocks due to permafrost heave the most likely explanationfor our findings. We thus concluded that differences in carbon isotope profiles ofthe hollows might point to the disturbance of the mires due to climate warming or dueto differences in hydrology. The characteristic profiles of the hummocks are indicators20 for micro-geomorphic change during permafrost up heaving.

  • 11. Aljetlawi, A A
    et al.
    Albertsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Leonardsson, K
    Effect of food and sediment pre-treatment in experiments with a deposit-feeding amphipod, Monoporeia affinis2000In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 249, no 2, 263-280 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally investigated the effects of different pre-treatments of the sediment, and the effect of daily addition of fresh phytoplankton, on the growth and survival of 1-year-old (1 +) individuals of the deposit feeder Monoporeia affinis (Amphipoda). We used three different types of sieved sediment: pre-frozen muddy clay, non-pre-frozen muddy clay, and fine sand. The muddy clay contained phytoplankton originating from the surface sediment sampled in the field during the late spring bloom. No phytoplankton was initially present in sand. The experiment lasted for 18 days. M. affinis responded to the daily phytoplankton addition by increasing growth. Phytoplankton addition had no significant effects on the survival of M. affinis. Upon phytoplankton addition, the sandy and non-frozen muddy clay gave similar growth and survival responses. In contrast, the pre-frozen sediment resulted in significantly lower growth and survival. The growth was negative in all treatments without phytoplankton. Thus, the high initial chlorophyll content in the muddy clay was not of sufficient quality or concentration to allow a positive growth response in M. affinis. The growth of M. affinis was significantly correlated with the reduction of the chlorophyll. Our results indicated that M. affinis is capable of assimilating settled phytoplankton with no, or only a few days' time delay. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science BN: All rights reserved.

  • 12. Allan, Mohammed
    et al.
    Le Roux, Gael
    De Vleeschouwer, Francois
    Bindler, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Blaauw, Maarten
    Piotrowska, Natalia
    Sikorski, Jaroslaw
    Fagel, Nathalie
    High-resolution reconstruction of atmospheric deposition of trace metals and metalloids since AD 1400 recorded by ombrotrophic peat cores in Hautes-Fagnes, Belgium2013In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 178, 381-394 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of our study was to determine the trace metal accumulation rates in the Misten bog, Hautes-Fagnes, Belgium, and assess these in relation to established histories of atmospheric emissions from anthropogenic sources. To address these aims we analyzed trace metals and metalloids (Pb, Cu, Ni, As, Sb, Cr, Co, V, Cd and Zn), as well as Pb isotopes, using XRF, Q-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS, respectively in two 40-cm peat sections, spanning the last 600 yr. The temporal increase of metal fluxes from the inception of the Industrial Revolution to the present varies by a factor of 5-50, with peak values found between AD 1930 and 1990. A cluster analysis combined with Pb isotopic composition allows the identification of the main sources of Pb and by inference of the other metals, which indicates that coal consumption and metallurgical activities were the predominant sources of pollution during the last 600 years.

    (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Allegrini, Elisa
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering.
    Boldrin, Alessio
    Tech Univ Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lundtorp, Kasper
    Babcock & Wilcox Vølund A/S, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fruergaard Astrup, Thomas
    Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering.
    Quality and generation rate of solid residues in the boiler of a waste-to-energy plant2014In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 270, 127-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Danish waste management system relies significantly on waste-to-energy (WtE) plants. The ash produced at the energy recovery section (boiler ash) is classified as hazardous waste, and is commonly mixed with fly ash and air pollution control residues before disposal. In this study, a detailed characterization of boiler ash from a Danish grate-based mass burn type WtE was performed, to evaluate the potential for improving ash management. Samples were collected at 10 different points along the boiler's convective part, and analysed for grain size distribution, content of inorganic elements, polychlorinated dibenzo-. p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD and PCDF), and leaching of metals. For all samples, PCDD and PCDF levels were below regulatory limits, while high pH values and leaching of e.g. Cl were critical. No significant differences were found between boiler ash from individual sections of the boiler, in terms of total content and leaching, indicating that separate management of individual ash fractions may not provide significant benefits. 

  • 14. Alonso, Carlos
    et al.
    Roman, Alfonso
    Bejarano, Maria Dolores
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Garcia de Jalon, Diego
    Carolli, Mauro
    A graphical approach to characterize sub-daily flow regimes and evaluate its alterations due to hydropeaking2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 574, 532-543 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most flow regime characterizations focus on long time scale flow patterns, which are not precise enough to capture key components of short-term flow fluctuations. Recent proposed methods describing sub-daily flow fluctuations are focused on limited components of the flow regime being unable to fully represent it, or on the identification of peaking events based on subjectively defined thresholds, being unsuitable for evaluations of short-term flow regime alterations through comparisons between regulated and free-flowing rivers. This study aims to launch an innovative approach based on the visual display of quantitative information to address the challenge of the short-term hydrologic characterization and evaluation of alteration resulting from hydropeaking. We propose a graphical method to represent a discrete set of ecologically relevant indices that characterize and evaluate the alteration of sub-daily flow regimes. The frequency of occurrence of classified values of a descriptive hydrological variable is represented in a map-like graph where longitude, latitude and altitude represent the Julian day, the value of the variable and the frequency of occurrence, respectively. Subsequently, we tested the method on several rivers, both free-flowing and subjected to hydropower production. The advantages of our approach compared to other analytical methods are: (i) it displays a great amount of information without oversimplification; (ii) it takes into account changes in the intensity, timing and frequency of the sub-daily flows, without needing a priori defined thresholds to identify hydropeaking events; and (iii) it supports the Water Framework Directive goal. Specifically, results from applications of our graphical method agree with Sauterleute and Charmasson (2014) analytical method.

  • 15. Anderson, K. E.
    et al.
    Nisbet, R. M.
    Diehl, S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Spatial scaling of consumer-resource interactions in advection-dominated systems2006In: American Naturalist, Vol. 168, no 3, 358-372 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecologists studying consumer-resource interactions in advection-dominated systems such as streams and rivers frequently seek to link the results of small-scale experiments with larger-scale patterns of distribution and abundance. Accomplishing this goal requires determining the characteristic scale, termed the response length, at which there is a shift from local dynamics dominated by advective dispersal to larger-scale dynamics dominated by births and deaths. Here, we model the dynamics of consumer-resource systems in a spatially variable, advective environment and show how consumer-resource interactions alter the response length relative to its single-species value. For one case involving a grazer that emigrates in response to high predator density, we quantify the changes using published data from small-scale experiments on aquatic invertebrates. Using Fourier analysis, we describe the responses of advection-dominated consumer-resource systems to spatially extended environmental variability in a way that involves explicit consideration of the response length. The patterns we derive for different consumer-resource systems exhibit important similarities in how component populations respond to spatial environmental variability affecting dispersal as opposed to demographic parameters.

  • 16. Anderson, K. E.
    et al.
    Nisbet, R. M.
    Diehl, S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Cooper, S. D.
    Scaling population responses to spatial environmental variability in advection-dominated systems2005In: Ecology Letters, Vol. 8, no 9, 933-943 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We model the spatial dynamics of an open population of organisms that disperse solely through advection in order to understand responses to multiscale environmental variability. We show that the distance over which a population responds to a localized perturbation, called the response length, can be characterized as an organisms average lifetime dispersal distance, unless there is strong density-dependence in demographic or dispersal rates. Continuous spatial fluctuations in demographic rates at scales smaller than the response length will be largely averaged in the population distribution, whereas those in per capita emigration rates will be strongly tracked. We illustrate these results using a parameterized example to show how responses to environmental variability may differ in streams with different average current velocities. Our model suggests an approach to linking local dynamics dominated by dispersal processes to larger-scale dynamics dominated by births and deaths.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ahlinder, Jon
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Mathisen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bäckman, Stina
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Elin
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Moa
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Thelaus, Johanna
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Aquatic ecosystems at risk for occurrence of pathogenic bacteriaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathogenic bacteria occur naturally in aquatic systems. Co-existence of bacteria and protozoa has led to development of predation resistance strategies, which is suggested to serve as a driver for evolution of pathogenic bacteria. However, the ecological mechanisms for selection for different types of predation resistant and pathogenic bacteria are poorly known. To disentangle effects from nutrient availability and protozoan predation pressure on the occurrence of varying predation resistant bacterial genera, an enrichment-dilution experiment was performed where an aquatic bacterial community was exposed to protozoa. Operational taxonomical units, specific for three predation resistant bacterial genera were identified; Pseudomonas, Rickettsia and Mycobacterium. These genera are also known to harbor species that are potentially pathogenic to mammals. Rickettsia and Mycobacterium were promoted where protozoa were abundant and the predation pressure high, while Pseudomonas dominated the bacterial community at the highest nutrient level where the predation pressure on bacteria were low. Our study thus indicates that waters of all nutrient states can harbor pathogenic bacteria, but that bacteria with different ecological strategies occur depending on nutrient level and perturbation. The generative model approach presented here provide a possibility to integrate environmental data in prediction models of pathogens in complex environments.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Hajdu, Susanna
    Inst. f. Systemekologi, Stockholms universitet.
    Haecky, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Kuparinen, Jorma
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Succession and growth limitation of phytoplankton in the Gulf of Bothnia (Baltic Sea)1996In: Marine Biology, ISSN 0025-3162, E-ISSN 1432-1793, Vol. 126, no 4, 791-801 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A one year field study of four stations in the Gulf of Bothnia during 1991 showed that the biomass was ca. two times, and primary productivity ca, four times, lower in the north (Bothnian Bay) than in the south (Bothnian Sea) during the summer. Nutrient addition experiments indicated phosphorus limitation of phytoplankton in the Bothnian Bay and the coastal areas in the northern Bothnian Sea, but nitrogen limitation in the open Bothnian Sea. A positive correlation between the phosphate concentration and the production/biomass ratio of phytoplankton was demonstrated, which partly explained the differences in the specific growth rate of the phytoplankton during the summer. Differences in photosynthetic active radiation between the stations also showed a covariation with the primary productivity. The relative importance of nutrient or light limitation for photosynthetic carbon fixation could not, however, be conclusively determined from this study. Marked differences in phytoplankton species composition from north to south were also observed. The number of dominating species was higher in the Bothnian Sea than in the Bothnian Bay. The distribution of some species could be explained as due to nutrient availability (e.g. Nodularia spumigena, Aphanizomenon sp.), while salinity probably limits the distribution of some limnic as well as marine species. The potentially toxic phytoplankton N. spumigena, Dinophysis acuminata and Chrysochromulina spp. were common in the Bothnian Sea but not in the Bothnian Bay. The pico- and nanoplankton biomass during late summer was higher than previously reported due to a revised carbon/volume ratio.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Höglander, Helena
    Karlsson, Chatarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Huseby, Siv
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Key role of phosphorus and nitrogen in regulating cyanobacterial community composition in the northern Baltic Sea2015In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 164, 161-171 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite cyanobacteria being a key phytoplankton group in the Baltic Sea, the factors governing their community structure are still poorly understood. Here, we studied the occurrence of the orders Chroococcales, Oscillatoriales and Nostocales, and potentially explanatory variables at five locations in the northern Baltic Sea from June–September, 1998–2012. Cyanobacteria constituted 1–36% of the total phytoplankton biomass along the north–south gradient. In the Bothnian Bay, Chroococcales and Oscillatoriales dominated the cyanobacterial community, whereas in the Bothnian Sea and northern Baltic Proper, Nostocales was the dominant group. The dominance of Chroococcales was coupled to low salinity and low total phosphorus, whereas Oscillatoriales correlated with high total nitrogen and low salinity. Nostocales correlated to high total phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus and salinity. Chroococcales showed an increase over time in the offshore Bothnian Bay, whereas Nostocales increased in the coastal Bothnian Sea and coastal Baltic Proper. The increase of Nostocales in the coastal Bothnian Sea was explained by a rise in total phosphorus and decrease in dissolved inorganic nitrogen compared to an increase of total nitrogen and phosphorus in the coastal Baltic Proper. No significant trends were observed in the cyanobacterial community in the offshore Bothnian Sea and the offshore northern Baltic Proper. We concluded that Chroococcales may be a useful indicator for increased phosphorus levels in waters with low phosphorus concentrations, whereas Nostocales could be used as a quality indicator for increasing phosphorus concentrations in waters with low inorganic N/P ratios (<20), such as in the coastal Bothnian Sea and Baltic Proper.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Joanna, Paczkowska
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Kratzer, Susanne
    Stockholm University Institutionen för ekologi miljö och botanik 106 91 Stockholm.
    Marked impact of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on estuarine primary and bacterial productionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Jurgensone, Iveta
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Simonelli, Paolo
    Bignert, Anders
    Lundberg, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Can Humic Water Discharge Counteract Eutrophication in Coastal Waters?2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, e61293- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common and established view is that increased inputs of nutrients to the sea, for example via river flooding, will cause eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms in coastal areas. We here show that this concept may be questioned in certain scenarios. Climate change has been predicted to cause increased inflow of freshwater to coastal areas in northern Europe. River waters in these areas are often brown from the presence of high concentrations of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon ( humic carbon), in addition to nitrogen and phosphorus. In this study we investigated whether increased inputs of humic carbon can change the structure and production of the pelagic food web in the recipient seawater. In a mesocosm experiment unfiltered seawater from the northern Baltic Sea was fertilized with inorganic nutrients and humic carbon (CNP), and only with inorganic nutrients (NP). The system responded differently to the humic carbon addition. In NP treatments bacterial, phytoplankton and zooplankton production increased and the systems turned net autotrophic, whereas the CNP-treatment only bacterial and zooplankton production increased driving the system to net heterotrophy. The size-structure of the food web showed large variations in the different treatments. In the enriched NP treatments the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous >20 mu m algae, while in the CNP treatments the phytoplankton was dominated by picocyanobacteria <5 mu m. Our results suggest that climate change scenarios, resulting in increased humic-rich river inflow, may counteract eutrophication in coastal waters, leading to a promotion of the microbial food web and other heterotrophic organisms, driving the recipient coastal waters to net-heterotrophy.

  • 22. Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Kristina
    Haecky, Pia
    Albertsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Changes in the pelagic microbial food web due to artificial eutrophication2006In: Aquatic Ecology, ISSN 1386-2588, E-ISSN 1573-5125, Vol. 40, no 3, 299-313 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of nutrient enrichment on the structure and carbon flow in the pelagic microbial food web was studied in mesocosm experiments using seawater from the northern Baltic Sea. The experiments included food webs of at least four trophic levels; (1) phytoplankton-bacteria, (2) flagellates, (3) ciliates and (4) mesozooplankton. In the enriched treatments high autotrophic growth rates were observed, followed by increased heterotrophic production. The largest growth increase was due to heterotrophic bacteria, indicating that the heterotrophic microbial food web was promoted. This was further supported by increased growth of heterotrophic flagellates and ciliates in the high nutrient treatments. The phytoplankton peak in the middle of the experiments was mainly due to an autotrophic nanoflagellate, Pyramimonas sp. At the end of the experiment, the proportion of heterotrophic organisms was higher in the nutrient enriched than in the nutrient-poor treatment, indicating increased predation control of primary producers. The proportion of potentially mixotrophic plankton, prymnesiophyceans, chrysophyceans and dinophyceans, were significantly higher in the nutrient-poor treatment. Furthermore, the results indicated that the food web efficiency, defined as mesozooplankton production per basal production (primary production + bacterial production - sedimentation), decreased with increasing nutrient status, possibly due to increasing loss processes in the food web. This could be explained by promotion of the heterotrophic microbial food web, causing more trophic levels and respiration steps in the food web.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Klimatförändringar kan leda till mindre fisk i havet2016In: Havet: om miljötillståndet i i svenska havsområden. 2015/2016, Göteborg: Havs- och vattenmyndigheten , 2016, 25-28 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Andersson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Övervakning och uppföljning av utter i Västerbottens län2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 25.
    Andersson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Adaptive trait utility in the feeding apparatus of European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus): Relationships between feeding morphology and maximum and minimum prey size in the diet of whitefish2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) populations diverge into morphs that differ in body size along a benthic-limnetic axis and throughout the depth of the water column. This process is assumedly initiated by the presence of northern pike (Esox lucius) and is followed by morphological adaptations to available food resources. In this study eight populations of whitefish was studied with the purpose of increasing the knowledge about adaptive trait utility in the feeding apparatus of whitefish. This was done by analyzing the mean and absolute maximum and minimum prey size ingested by fish along four morphological trait gradients. The morphological traits was body size, gill raker number and density, and gape size. The results show clear evidence of morphological adaptations in both the benthic and limnetic habitat, furthermore, when comparing the two prey size responses (mean and absolute values) it becomes clear that none of the studied whitefish is physically constrained in terms of the largest prey they can ingest. However, large fish seem to be limited in eating small prey sizes. Interestingly, I also found strong indicators for filter feeding adaptation for one of the studied populations.  

  • 26.
    Andersson, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    En studie av gruvindustrins påverkan på ett akvatiskt system.: Brubäckens påverkan på Granforsmagasinet2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 27.
    Andersson, Jannika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    How does nutrients and light affect algal growth in Swedish headwater streams?: A study using nutrient diffusing substrate and natural gradients of light2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Gaining knowledge about what factors determine benthic algal biomass and productivity is vital for understanding food webs in aquatic systems, especially in woodland streams with naturally low rates of primary productivity. The aim of this study was to investigate what factors determine algal growth in Swedish headwater streams. Nutrients, in terms of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), and light are factors known to affect algal growth. By using nutrient diffusing substrate (NDS) and different gradients of light, it was possible to test the importance of these factors. To determine the effect of the experiment, the study was carried out in a forested reference stream, which is largely shaded with extreme low nutrient levels, and in a stream running through a clear-cutting plantation with high nutrient levels and incident light. In the forested reference stream it became clear that algal growth increased by experimentally adding N (P<0.005), although light did not affect the productivity. In the stream running through the clear-cut, algal productivity increased significantly with higher levels of light (P<0.005), regardless of nutrient addition. The results from this study suggest that light only becomes the depending factor when sufficient amounts of nutrients are available. However, it is still unclear at what nutrient levels this shift occur, and therefore future research is recommended.

  • 28. Andersson, Jon
    et al.
    Dynesius, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hjalten, Joakim
    Short-term response to stump harvesting by the ground flora in boreal clearcuts2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 32, no 3, 239-245 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied short-term ground vegetation responses to stump harvesting by recording the occurrence of all species of bryophytes, vascular plants and the cover of soil disturbance on 20 clearcuts in the Southern and Middle Boreal zone in northern Scandinavia. All 20 clearcuts were slash-harvested and scarified and 10 of the clearcuts were also stump-harvested. The added effect of stump harvesting was assessed by comparing stump-harvested clearcuts with non-stump-harvested clearcuts. We tested whether stump harvesting causes extra soil disturbance compared to conventional forestry and if stump harvesting is affecting the assemblage, species richness and occurrence of individual species of vascular plants and bryophytes in boreal clearcuts. Our results revealed that stump harvesting causes an increase in the area of disturbed soil surface compared to conventional harvesting. Four of the most commonly occurring plant species in this area were significantly affected by stump harvesting, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea had a median occurrence of only 20% of that in non-stump-harvested clearcuts. The large impact on some plant species from a relatively modest increase of soil disturbance caused by stump harvesting suggest that stumps, with their slightly elevated bases, contributes to the survival of certain species on clearcuts.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Jon
    et al.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Dynesius, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Long-term effects of stump harvesting and landscape composition on beetle assemblages in the hemiboreal forest of Sweden.2012In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, Vol. 271, 75-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on the effects of stump harvesting on forest biodiversity are scarce and studies on long-term effects are until now non-existent. We evaluated such long-term effects by sampling beetles at 14 clear-cuts with and 14 clear-cuts without stump harvesting; harvesting had been done 21–28 years before this study. By using window traps, we collected 6429 individuals belonging to 432 species in 55 taxonomic families. To control for potentially confounding effects of among-site variations in landscape setting we also assessed forest age and volume of deciduous trees within the forest surrounding each site. The long-term effects from harvesting on beetle abundance, species richness and species composition was generally small in comparison to the influence of the characteristics of the surrounding forests. The species richness of the beetle family Latridiidae and the functional group fungivores appeared, however, to be negatively affected by the previous stump harvesting, while several other groups showed strong associations to the characteristics of the surrounding forest. We found little support for considerable long-term effects of stump harvesting on beetles flying in the stands. Long-term effects of stump harvesting at the landscape scale accumulated from harvest of many localities may still be severe, and should be the subject of future studies.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nutrient cycling by the herbivorous insect Chrysomela tremulae: Nutrient content in leaves and frass and measurements of ingestion, egestion and exuviation rates2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Insect herbivory on forest canopies strongly affects ecosystem nutrient cycling and availability in a variety of ways, e.g. by changing the quantity, quality and timing of nutrient input to forest soils. A qualitative method for measurements of ingestion, egestion and exuviation rates of the insect Chrysomela tremulae on leaves of the hybrid Populus tremula x tremuloides were tested in this study with the aim to detect differences in relative nutrient cycling efficiencies. The assimilation efficiency (AD), efficiency of conversion of digested food (ECD) and efficiency of conversion of ingested food (ECI) increased from 1st, through 2nd and 3rd instar larvae with generally higher efficiencies for nitrogen than carbon. Effects on nutrient limitations for the insect were also tested by increasing the C:N ratio of insect diet. A carbohydrate solution was painted onto leaves which resulted in a significant increase in C:N (p<0.0001). This lead to a trend of lengthened developmental time for each ontogenetic stage, as well as higher ingestion rate and lower egestion- and exuviation rates. However, a different method of increasing the C:N ratio is recommended in future experiments since the leaves never truly absorbed the solution.

  • 31.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sexual selection and intersexual conflicts in water striders1992Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Arthington, Angela H
    et al.
    Australian Rivers Institute and eWater Co-operative Research Centre, Griffith University, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Naiman, Robert J
    School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences, University of Washington-355020, Seattle, WA, U.S.A..
    McClain, Michael E
    UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft, The Netherlands and Department of Earth and Environment, Florida International University, Miami, FL, U.S.A..
    Nilsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Preserving the biodiversity and ecological services of rivers: new challenges and research opportunities2010In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 55, no 1, 1-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural biogeochemical processes and diverse communities of aquatic biota regulate freshwater quantity and quality in ways that are not sufficiently acknowledged nor appreciated by the water resources management community. The establishment and enforcement of environmental flow requirements offer promising means to improve and care for these critical environmental services. This Special Issue provides new insights and novel techniques to determine, protect and restore ecologically and socially sustainable flow regimes, and thereby help achieve the water-related goals of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment.

    Whilst alteration of flow, sediment, organic matter and thermal regimes interact to reduce biological diversity and the ecological integrity of freshwater ecosystems - and thereby degrade the properties and ecological services most valued by humans - ‘environmental flows' left in rivers, or restored to developed rivers, will sustain many ecological and societal values. The success of river protection and rehabilitation ⁄ restoration depends upon understanding and accurately modelling relationships between hydrological patterns, fluvial disturbance and ecological responses in rivers and floodplains.

    This Special Issue presents new analytical and modelling approaches to support the development of hydro-ecological models and environmental flow standards at multiple spatial scales - applicable to all rivers in any economic and societal setting. Examples include the new framework Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) founded on hydrological classification and gradient analysis; ecological trait analysis; Bayesian hierarchical modelling; Bayesian Decision Networks; and Integrated Basin Flow Assessment (IBFA).

    Advances in the allocation of flood flows along the River Murray in Australia, an Ecosystems Function Model (HEC-EFM) for the Bill Williams River restoration programme in Arizona (U.S.A), the European Water Framework Directive, and improved management of hydroelectric dams demonstrate the potential for significant ecological recovery following partial restoration of natural river flow regimes.

    Based on contributions to this Special Issue, the action agenda of the 2007 Brisbane Declaration on environmental flows and the wider literature, we propose an invigorated global research programme to construct and calibrate hydro-ecological models and to quantify the ecological goods and services provided by rivers in contrasting hydro-climatic settings across the globe. A major challenge will be to find acceptable ways to manage rivers for multiple uses. Climate change intensifies the urgency. Environmental flows help to preserve the innate resilience of aquatic ecosystems, and thereby offer the promise of improved sustainability and wellbeing for people as well as for ecosystems.

  • 33.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Carbon metabolism in clear-water and brown-water lakes2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The trophic state of lakes is commonly defined by the concentration of nutrients in the water column. High nutrient concentrations generate high phytoplankton production, and lakes with low nutrient concentrations are considered low-productive. This simplified view of lake productivity ignores the fact that benthic primary producers and heterotrophic bacteria can be important basal producers in lake ecosystems.

    In this thesis I have studied clear-water and brown-water lakes with respect to primary production, respiration and bacterial production based on allochthonous organic carbon. These processes were quantified in pelagic and benthic habitats on temporal and spatial scales. I also calculated the net ecosystem production of the lakes, defined as the difference between gross primary production (GPP) and respiration (R). The net ecosystem production indicates whether a lake is net heterotrophic (GPP < R), net autotrophic (GPP > R) or in metabolic balance (GPP = R). Net heterotrophic lakes are sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere since respiration in these lakes, by definition, is subsidized by an external organic carbon source. External organic carbon is transported to lakes from the terrestrial environment via inlets, and can serve as a carbon source for bacteria but it also limits light availability for primary producers by absorbing light.

    On a seasonal scale, four of the clear-water lakes studied in this thesis were dominated by primary production in the soft-bottom benthic habitat and by respiration in the pelagic habitat. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were low in the lakes, but still high enough to cause the lakes to be net heterotrophic. However, the lakes were not low-productive due to the high production in the benthic habitat. One of the clear-water lakes was studied also during the winter and much of the respiration under ice was supported by the benthic primary production from the previous summer. This is in contrast to brown-water lakes where winter respiration is suggested to be supported by allochthonous organic carbon.

    By studying lakes in a DOC gradient (i.e. from clear-water to brown-water lakes) I could draw two major conclusions. The lakes became less productive since benthic primary production decreased with increasing light extinction, and the lakes became larger sources of CO2 to the atmosphere since pelagic respiration was subsidized by allochthonous organic carbon. Thus, lake carbon metabolism can have an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their processing of terrestrial organic carbon and to their possible feedback effects on the climate system.

  • 34. Ask, Jenny
    et al.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Strömgren, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Importance of coastal primary production in the northern Baltic Sea2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, no 6, 635-648 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we measured depth-dependent benthic microalgal primary production in a Bothnian Bay estuary to estimate the benthic contribution to total primary production. In addition, we compiled data on benthic microalgal primary production in the entire Baltic Sea. In the estuary, the benthic habitat contributed 17 % to the total annual primary production, and when upscaling our data to the entire Bothnian Bay, the corresponding value was 31 %. This estimated benthic share (31 %) is three times higher compared to past estimates of 10 %. The main reason for this discrepancy is the lack of data regarding benthic primary production in the northern Baltic Sea, but also that past studies overestimated the importance of pelagic primary production by not correcting for system-specific bathymetric variation. Our study thus highlights the importance of benthic communities for the northern Baltic Sea ecosystem in general and for future management strategies and ecosystem studies in particular.

  • 35.
    Ask, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Invasion of top and intermediate consumers in a size structured fish community2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis I have investigated the effects of invading top and intermediate consumers in a size-structured fish community, using a combination of field studies, a lake invasion experiment and smaller scale pond and aquaria experiments.

    The lake invasion experiment was based on introductions of an intermediate consumer, ninespine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius L.), in to allopatric populations of an omnivorous top predator, Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus L.). The invasion experiment was performed in two tundra lakes and in two birch forest lakes to investigate the effect of climate on the invasion success. I found that the effect of sticklebacks on char was size dependent. Small char suffered reduced growth from resource competition with sticklebacks whereas the maximum size of adult char increased from the addition of a larger prey resource, stickleback. The negative effect of sticklebacks on the growth of small char suggests that sticklebacks may be a better resource competitor than char, which was also supported by the pond and aquaria experiments. The pond experiments also suggested that char were more efficient cannibals than interspecific predators on sticklebacks. Cannibalism in char may limit the recruitment of char and decrease both their predatory and competitive effect on coexisting species and thereby also promote the coexistence of char and sticklebacks. The successful invasion by sticklebacks and their subsequent increases in density suggest that the absence of sticklebacks in char lakes in this region is not caused by biotic interactions with char. Instead, it may be suggested that co-occurrence of sticklebacks and char in the region is limited by dispersal.

    The char – stickleback system resembles an intraguild predation system with char as the top consumer and stickleback as the intermediate consumer. The effects of the stickleback invasion is also contrasted with a field study of a northern pike (Esox lucius L.) invasion into a system with coexisting char and stickleback, where pike can be viewed as the top consumer and char as the intermediate consumer both feeding on sticklebacks. In this case pike excluded char. The identity of the invading species and the relative strength of the predatory and competitive interactions in the two contrasting systems are discussed in relation to coexistence in intraguild predation systems. I found that the identity of the invading species is of crucial importance for the response at the ecosystem level, and that the inherent size dependency of competitive and predatory interactions in fish communities is important for attaining a mechanistical understanding of the effects of invasive species in lake ecosystems.

  • 36.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Competition mediated coexistence of invading intermediate consumer, ninespine stickleback, and a resident omnivorous top predator, Arctic charManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change results in changes in the geographical distribution of species. Species invasion success into a new area is dependent both on the dispersal ability of species as well as the strength and identity of biotic interactions between resident and invading species. Coexistence in intraguild predation (IGP) systems depends on the relative strength of predation and competition interactions which in turn are temperature dependent. We investigated the effects of introducing an intermediate consumer, ninespine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius), into allopatric populations of the omnivorous top predator Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). Introductions were performed in lakes with different climate regimes, two tundra lakes and two forest lakes that differed in average summer temperatures with 1.4 ± 0.5 ºC (average ± 1SD). We found that sticklebacks were able to invade and increase in density in both tundra and forest lakes. Sticklebacks had strong negative effects on resource densities which also was reflected in a decreased growth of small char. Increasing stickleback density had a positive effect on growth of large adults and on the maximum size of char. We conclude that stickleback presence is not limited by biological interactions in these systems but rather by dispersion ability. We suggest that the size dependency in the response of char to the invasion of sticklebacks is fundamental for the successful invasion of sticklebacks, and that size dependent interactions including cannibalism play important roles for coexistence in natural IGP-systems.

  • 37.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Temperature mediated effects on top consumer populations in subarctic lakesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of temperature on top consumer populations in subarctic lake communities were studied by contrasting two lake pairs in different climate regimes: one pair on the low alpine tundra and one pair in the subalpine birch forest. We measured zooplankton and macroinvertebrate biomasses over the season and estimated population density and size structure of the top consumer Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). Furthermore, we modelled char growth using literature data on temperature dependent search rate, handling time and metabolic demands. The forest lakes were warmer than the tundra lakes. Char in the forest lakes were larger and had a higher individual growth compared to char in the tundra lakes, while population density and biomasses of char were not different between the forest and the tundra lakes. There were no differences in macroinvertebrate and zooplankton resource levels available for char between lake pairs. Our modeling of char growth revealed that higher temperature increased growth of char at the observed resource densities, suggesting that the higher temperature in the forest lakes was primarily the cause of the higher growth of char in these lakes. We suggest that cannibalism in char may regulate char recruitment and thereby population density and biomass of char leading to effects of increasing temperature on consumer biomass and consumer individual growth different from what is expected in pure consumer-resource systems. Our results emphasize the importance of feedbacks within ecosystems when addressing effects of climate change and increasing temperature on lake communities.

  • 38. Atkinson, Lindsey J
    et al.
    Campbell, Catherine D
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Zaragoza-Castells, Joana
    Hurry, Vaughan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Atkin, Owen K
    Impact of growth temperature on scaling relationships linking photosynthetic metabolism to leaf functional traits2010In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 24, no 6, 1181-1191 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Scaling relationships linking photosynthesis (A) to leaf traits are important for predicting vegetation patterns and plant-atmosphere carbon fluxes. Here, we investigated the impact of growth temperature on such scaling relationships.

    2. We assessed whether changes in growth temperature systematically altered the slope and/or intercepts of log-log plots of A vs leaf mass per unit leaf area (LMA), nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations for 19 contrasting plant species grown hydroponically at four temperatures (7, 14, 21 and 28 degrees C) in controlled environment cabinets. Responses of 21 degrees C-grown pre-existing (PE) leaves experiencing a 10 day growth temperature (7, 14, 21 and 28 degrees C) treatment, and newly-developed (ND) leaves formed at each of the four new growth temperatures, were quantified. Irrespective of the growth temperature treatment, rates of light-saturated photosynthesis (A) were measured at 21 degrees C.

    3. Changes in growth temperature altered the scaling between A and leaf traits in pre-existing (PE) leaves, with thermal history accounting for up to 17% and 31% of the variation on a mass and area basis, respectively. However, growth temperature played almost no role in accounting for scatter when comparisons were made of newly-developed (ND) leaves that form at each growth temperature.

    4. Photosynthetic nitrogen and phosphorus use efficiency (PNUE and PPUE, respectively) decreased with increasing LMA. No systematic differences in temperature-mediated reductions in PNUE or PPUE of PE leaves were found among species.

    5. Overall, these results highlight the importance of leaf development in determining the effects of sustained changes in growth temperature on scaling relationships linking photosynthesis to other leaf traits.

  • 39.
    Aunapuu, Maano
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Predators in low arctic tundra and their impact on community structure and dynamics2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The abundance of predators and their impact on ecosystem dynamics is a vividly discussed topic in current ecology. In my studies, incorporating field observations, field experiments and theoretical modeling, I explored the importance of predators and predation in a low arctic tundra ecosystem in northern Norway. This involved observing the abundance and spatial activity of predators (raptors and small mustelids); manipulating the abundance of predators (spiders and birds) in an arthropod community; and exploring the theoretical consequences of intraguild predation on the coexistence among predators.

    The results show that predation is important both in the arthropod assemblage and, depending on the productivity of the community, in the vertebrate assemblage. In arthropod communities predators are at least as abundant as their prey, whereas in the vertebrate part of ecosystem, predators are substantially less abundant than their prey. Still, in both cases predators had strong impact on their prey, influencing the abundance of prey and the species composition of prey assemblages. The impact of predation cascaded to the plant community both in the reticulate and complex arthropod food web and in the linear food chain-like vertebrate community. In the vertebrate-based community we could even observe the long time scale effect on plant community composition.

    Within the predator community, exploitation competition and intraguild predation were the structuring forces. As the arthropod communities consist of predators with different sizes, intraguild predation is an energetically important interaction for top predators. As a consequence, they reduce the abundance of intermediate predators and the impact of intermediate predators on other prey groups. Moreover, being supported by intermediate predators, top predators can have stronger impact themselves on other prey groups.

    In vertebrate communities, intraguild predation seems to be unimportant as energetic link, instead it manifests as an extreme version of interference competition. Therefore intraguild predation reduces the likelihood of coexistence, as it is due limited prey diversity and intense exploitative competition already precarious in the low arctic tundra.

    In conclusion, predators have strong impact on their prey, especially in the more productive parts of the low arctic tundra. This applies even to the food webs with complex and reticulate structure, and these effects carry through the community both in the short time scale of population growth and on the long time scale of population generations.

  • 40.
    Aunapuu, Maano
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Oksanen, Lauri
    Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Natural Sciences, Finnmark University College, Alta, Norway.
    Oksanen, Tarja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Korpimaki, Erkki
    Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Intraguild predation and interspecific co-existence between predatory endotherms2010In: Evolutionary Ecology Research, ISSN 1522-0613, Vol. 12, no 2, 151-168 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to the current predominant view, intraguild predation leads to the replacement of intermediate predators from highly productive habitats, whereas top predators and intermediate predators can co-exist in habitats with intermediate primary productivity. These predictions are contradicted by the observed abundance of intermediate predators in productive environments. But the predictions are derived by modelling interactions in food chains where the top predator is primarily adapted to exploit intermediate predators but also has some capacity to exploit the resources of the intermediate predators. We call this 'food chain omnivory'. In contrast, 'genuine intraguild predation' is the case where the two predators have shared tactics of resource acquisition, resulting in broadly overlapping prey preferences that is, the interacting predators belong to the same guild as defined by Root (1967).

    Questions: What are the effects of productivity on genuine intraguild predation? Do the predictions for food chain omnivory apply also to genuine intraguild predation'?

    Methods: We modelled genuine intraguild predation by using parameter values such that the intermediate predator and the basal prey were equally valuable to the top predator. We assumed that the basal prey was a herbivore, with a carrying capacity directly proportional to primary productivity and a habitat-specific intrinsic rate of population growth that increases asymptotically in response to increasing primary productivity.

    Results: With the above premises, intermediate predators can prevail even in highly productive habitat. Also, a priority effect is possible. Predictable replacement of intermediate predators by top predators requires that intermediate predators are much easier to find than basal prey. Stable co-existence requires biologically implausible parameter values.

    Conclusions: Genuine intraguild predation is a destabilizing force in food webs. The dynamics of genuine intraguild predation systems differ from those in food chain omnivory systems where the intermediate and top predators have different feeding tactics and, therefore, different prey preferences.

  • 41. Axelsson, E. Petter
    et al.
    Hjalten, Joakim
    LeRoy, Carri J.
    Whitham, Thomas G.
    Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta
    Wennström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Leaf litter from insect-resistant transgenic trees causes changes in aquatic insect community composition2011In: Journal of Applied Ecology, ISSN 0021-8901, E-ISSN 1365-2664, Vol. 48, no 6, 1472-1479 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Recent research has addressed how transgenic residues fromarable crops may influence adjacent waterways, aquatic consumers and important ecosystem processes such as litter breakdown rates. With future applications of transgenic plants in forestry, such concerns may apply to forest stream ecosystems. Before any large-scale release of genetically modified (GM) trees, it is therefore imperative to evaluate the effects of genetic modifications in trees on such ecosystems. 2. We conducted decomposition experiments under natural stream conditions using leaf litter from greenhouse grown GM trees (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides) that express Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins (cry3Aa; targeting coleopteran leaf-feeding beetles) to examine the hypothesis that GM trees would affect litter decomposition rates and/or the aquatic arthropod community that colonizes and feeds on leaf litter in streams. 3. We show that two independent transformations of isogenic Populus trees to express Bt toxins caused similar changes to the composition of aquatic insects colonizing the leaf litter, ultimately manifested in a 25% and 33% increases in average insect abundance. 4. Measurements of 24 phenolic compounds as well as nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in the litter did not significantly differ among modified and wild-type trees and were thus not sufficient to explain these differences in the insect assemblage. 5. Decomposition rates were comparable among litter treatments suggesting that the normal suite of leaf traits influencing decomposition was similar among litter treatments and that the shredding functions of the community were maintained despite the changes in insect community composition. 6. Synthesis and applications. We report that leaf litter from GM trees affected the composition of aquatic insect communities that colonized litter under natural stream conditions. This suggests that forest management using GM trees may affect adjacent waterways in unanticipated ways, which should be considered in future commercial applications of GM trees. We also argue that studies at different scales (e.g. species, communities and ecosystems) will be needed for a full understanding of the environmental effects of Bt plants.

  • 42. Axelsson, E. Petter
    et al.
    Hjalten, Joakim
    Whitham, Thomas G.
    Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta
    Pilate, Gilles
    Wennström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Leaf ontogeny interacts with Bt modification to affect innate resistance in GM aspens2011In: Chemoecology, ISSN 0937-7409, E-ISSN 1423-0445, Vol. 21, no 3, 161-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioassays with a non-target slug (Deroceras spp.) and chemical analyses were conducted using leaf tissue from already existing genetically modified insect-resistant aspen trees to examine whether genetic modifications to produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins could affect plant phytochemistry, which in turn might influence plant-herbivore interactions. Three major patterns emerged. First, two independent modifications for Bt resistance affected the phytochemical profiles of leaves such that both were different from the isogenic wild-type (Wt) control leaves, but also different from each other. Among the contributors to these differences are substances with a presumed involvement in resistance, such as salicortin and soluble condensed tannins. Second, bioassays with one Bt line suggest that the modification somehow affected innate resistance ("Innate" is used here in opposition to the "acquired" Bt resistance) in ways such that slugs preferred Bt over Wt leaves. Third, the preference test suggests that the innate resistance in Bt relative to Wt plants may not be uniformly expressed throughout the whole plant and that leaf ontogeny interacts with the modification to affect resistance. This was manifested through an ontogenetic determined increase in leaf consumption that was more than four times higher in Bt compared to Wt leaves. Our result are of principal importance, as these indicate that genetic modifications can affect innate resistance and thus non-target herbivores in ways that may have commercial and/or environmental consequences. The finding of a modification-ontogeny interaction effect on innate resistance may be especially important in assessments of GM plants with a long lifespan such as trees.

  • 43. Axelsson, E Petter
    et al.
    Hjältén, Joakim
    LeRoy, Carri J
    Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta
    Wennström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Pilate, Gilles
    Can leaf litter from genetically modified trees affect aquatic ecosystems?2010In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 13, no 7, 1049-1059 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In addition to potential benefits, biotechnology in silviculture may also be associated with environmental considerations, including effects on organisms associated with the living tree and on ecosystems and processes dependent on tree residue. We examined whether genetic modification of lignin characteristics (CAD and COMT) in Populus sp. affected leaf litter quality, the decomposition of leaf litter, and the assemblages of aquatic insects colonizing the litter in three natural streams. The decomposition of leaf litter from one of the genetically modified (GM) lines (CAD) was affected in ways that were comparable over streams and harvest dates. After 84 days in streams, CAD-litter had lost approximately 6.1% less mass than the non-GM litter. Genetic modification also affected the concentration of phenolics and carbon in the litter but this only partially explained the decomposition differences, suggesting that other factors were also involved. Insect community analyses comparing GM and non-GM litter showed no significant differences, and the two GM litters showed differences only in the 84-day litterbags. The total abundance and species richness of insects were also similar on GM and non-GM litter. The results presented here suggest that genetic modifications in trees can influence litter quality and thus have a potential to generate effects that can cross ecosystem boundaries and influence ecosystem processes not directly associated with the tree. Overall, the realized ecological effects of the GM tree varieties used here were nevertheless shown to be relatively small.

  • 44.
    Back, Isabella
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Do pike and running water induce phenotypic changes in body shape of crucian carp?2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 45.
    Backman, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Zooplankton community respiration in the surface thermocline and deep water masses of Gulf och Maine2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 46.
    Baker, Susan
    et al.
    Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales U.K..
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ecological restoration success: a policy analysis understanding2016In: Restoration Ecology, ISSN 1061-2971, E-ISSN 1526-100X, Vol. 24, no 3, 284-290 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses how ecological restoration success can be understood and evaluated using a policy analysis lens. First, this article details a conceptual tool that helps to develop a more encompassing set of criteria to assess restoration activities that provide socioeconomic benefits. Second, by broadening the understanding of restoration success and how it can be evaluated, it allows a more critical view of evaluation itself and its uses as a policy tool. A table is presented that can help practitioners reveal preferences and clarify the aims and objectives of particular initiatives. The table also sensitizes practitioners to the complexity of the links between restoration rationales and evaluation criteria, which in turn may open up much needed discussion and dialogue between restoration participants about the underlying values an actor may wish to promote. It heightens awareness of the fact that evaluation methods need to recognize that restoration is driven by multiple rationales often in the same project, both process driven and output oriented, which in turn can change over time. Adding process and output criteria together may also raise issues of priority. Evaluation criteria thus need to be assigned in ways that reflect these multiplicities, while at the same time recognizing that some restoration values might be conflictual and that there may be winners and losers. Furthermore, judgement about "failure" of a project can change as new goals emerge in delivery and implementation. Ecological restoration evaluation should therefore be ongoing, contextual, and not a one-off event.

  • 47. Bakker, Elisabeth S.
    et al.
    Sarneel, Judith
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Gulati, Ramesh D.
    Liu, Zhengwen
    van Donk, Ellen
    Restoring macrophyte diversity in shallow temperate lakes: biotic versus abiotic constraints2013In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 710, no 1, 23-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many lake restoration projects have led to decreased nutrient loads and increased water transparency, the establishment or expansion of macrophytes does not immediately follow the improved abiotic conditions and it is often unclear whether vegetation with high macrophyte diversity will return. We provide an overview of the potential bottlenecks for restoration of submerged macrophyte vegetation with a high biodiversity and focus on the biotic factors, including the availability of propagules, herbivory, plant competition and the role of remnant populations. We found that the potential for restoration in many lakes is large when clear water conditions are met, even though the macrophyte community composition of the early 1900s, the start of human-induced large-scale eutrophication in Northwestern Europe, could not be restored. However, emerging charophytes and species rich vegetation are often lost due to competition with eutrophic species. Disturbances such as herbivory can limit dominance by eutrophic species and improve macrophyte diversity. We conclude that it is imperative to study the role of propagule availability more closely as well as the biotic interactions including herbivory and plant competition. After abiotic conditions are met, these will further determine macrophyte diversity and define what exactly can be restored and what not.

  • 48. Balogianni, Vasiliki G.
    et al.
    Blume-Werry, Gesche
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Wilson, Scott D.
    Root production in contrasting ecosystems: the impact of rhizotron sampling frequency2016In: Plant Ecology, ISSN 1385-0237, E-ISSN 1573-5052, Vol. 217, no 11, 1359-1367 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite their critical role in every terrestrial ecosystem, fine root production and mortality have not been widely compared among systems due to the practical difficulties of belowground research. We examined fine root production and mortality among five contrasting sites: native and invaded grassland in eastern Montana, USA, aspen forest in southern Saskatchewan, Canada, and birch forest and tundra in northern Sweden. Additionally, we investigated the importance of minirhizotron sampling interval on measures of root production and mortality by comparing measures produced from 1-, 7-, 14-, and 21-day sample intervals. Root length and mortality varied significantly among sites, with invaded grassland having the greatest root length (> 2 x than any other site) and significantly greater root mortality than native grassland (54 %). In contrast, there were no significant differences in root production among the sites. Sample interval had no significant influence on root production or mortality. Minirhizotron sampling intervals up to 3 weeks did not underestimate the measures of root production and mortality in comparison to measures derived from shorter sampling intervals, regardless of the site studied. The results suggest that 3 weeks can be an accurate and efficient sample interval when studying root production and mortality with minirhizotrons.

  • 49.
    Baltar, Federico
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för biologi och miljö (BOM).
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för biologi och miljö (BOM).
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för biologi och miljö (BOM).
    Cell-free extracellular enzymatic activity is linked to seasonal temperature changes: a case study in the Baltic Sea2016In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 13, no 9, 2815-2821 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracellular enzymatic activities (EEA) are a crucial step on the degradation of organic matter. Dissolved (cell-free) extracellular enzymes in seawater can make up a significant contribution of the bulk EEA. However, the factors controlling the proportion of dissolved EEA in the marine environment remain unknown. Here we studied the seasonal changes in the proportion of dissolved relative to total EEA (of alkaline phosphatase [APase], β-glucosidase, [BGase], and leucine aminopeptidase, [LAPase]), in the Baltic Sea for 18 months. The proportio n of dissolved EEA ranged between 37-100%, 0-100%, 34-100% for APase, BGase and LAPase, respectively. A consistent seasonal pattern in the proportion of dissolved EEA was found among all the studied enzymes, with values up to 100% during winter and <40% du ring summer. A significant negative relation was found between the 21proportion of dissolved EEA and temperature, indicating that temperature might be a critical factor controlling the proportion of dissolved relative to total EEA in marine environments. Our results suggest a strong decoupling of hydrolysis rates from mi crobial dynamics in cold waters. This implies that under cold conditions, cell-free enzymes can contribute to substrate availability at large distances from the producing cell, increasing the dissociation between the hydrolysis of organic compounds and the actual microbes producing the enzymes. This also indicates that global warming could come to affect the hydrolysis of organic matter by reducing the hydrolytic activity of cell-free enzymes.

  • 50.
    Bandau, Franziska
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Importance of tannins for responses of aspen to anthropogenic nitrogen enrichment2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Boreal forests are often strongly nitrogen (N) limited. However, human activities are leading to increased N inputs into these ecosystems, through atmospheric N deposition and forest fertilization. N input into boreal forests can promote net primary productivity, increase herbivore and pathogen damage, and shift plant species composition and community structure. Genetic diversity has been suggested as a key mechanism to promote a plant species’ stability within communities in response to environmental change. Within any plant population, specific traits (e.g. growth and defense traits) can vary substantially among individuals, and a greater variation in traits may increase chances for the persistence of at least some individuals of a population, when environmental conditions change. One aspect of plant chemistry that can greatly vary among different genotypes (GTs) are condensed tannin (CTs). These secondary metabolites have been suggested to affect plant performance in many ways, e.g. through influencing plant growth, the interactions of plants with herbivores and pathogens, and through affecting litter decomposition, and hence the return of nutrients to plants. To investigate how genotypic variation in foliar CT production may mediate the effects that anthropogenic N enrichment can have on plant performance and litter decomposition, I performed a series of experiments. For these experiments, aspen (Populus tremula) GTs with contrasting abilities to produce foliar CTs (i.e. low- vs. high-tannin producers) were grown under 3 N conditions, representing ambient N (+0 kg ha-1), upper level atmospheric N deposition (+15 kg ha-1), and forest fertilization rates (+150 kg ha-1). This general experimental set-up was once established in a field-like environment, from which natural enemies were excluded, and once in a field, in which enemies were present. In my first two studies, I investigated tissue chemistry and plant performance in both environments. I observed that foliar CT levels decreased in response to N in the enemy‑free environment (study I), but increased with added N when enemies were present (study II). These opposing responses to N may be explained by differences in soil N availability in the two environments, or by induction of CTs after enemy attack. Enemy damage generally increased in response to N, and was higher in low-tannin than in high-tannin plants across all N levels. Plant growth of high‑tannin plants was restricted under ambient and low N conditions, probably due to a trade-off between growth and defense. This growth constraint for high‑tannin plants was weakened, when high amounts of N were added (study I and II), and when enemy levels were sufficiently high, so that benefits gained through defense could outweigh the costs of defense production (study II). Despite those general responses of low- and high‑tannin producers to added N, I also observed a number of individual responses of GTs to N addition, which in some case were not connected to the intrinsic ability of the GTs to produce foliar CTs. In study III, gene expression levels in young leaves and phenolic pools of the plants that were grown in the enemy‑free environment were studied. This study revealed that gene control over the regulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway (PPP) was distributed across the entire pathway. Moreover, PPP gene expression was higher in high-tannin GTs than in low‑tannin GTs, particularly under ambient N. At the low N level, gene expressions declined for both low- and high-tannin producers, whereas at the high N level expression at the beginning and the end of the PPP was upregulated and difference between tannin groups disappeared. Furthermore, this study showed that phenolic pools were frequently uncorrelated, and that phenolic pools were only to some extent related to tannin production and gene expression. In study IV, I investigated the decomposability of litter from the field plants. I found that N enrichment generally decreased mass loss, but there was substantial genetic variation in decomposition rates, and GTs were differentially responsive to added N. Study IV further showed that CTs only had a weak effect on decomposition, and other traits, such as specific leaf area and the lignin:N ratio, could better explain genotypic difference in mass loss. Furthermore, N addition caused a shift in which traits most strongly influenced decomposition rates. Collectively, the result of these studies highlight the importance of genetic diversity to promote the stability of species in environments that experience anthropogenic change.

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