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  • 1. Abalaka, J. L.
    et al.
    Ottosson, Ulf
    Tende, Talatu
    Larson, Keith W.
    Rock Firefinch Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis in the Mandara Mountains, north-east Nigeria: a new subspecies?2010In: African Bird Club Bulletin, ISSN 1352-481X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 210-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    L’Amarante des rochers Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis dans les Monts Mandara, Nigeria du sud-est: une nouvelle sous-espèce ? Nous fournissons une description d’un mâle et d’une femelle, ainsi que desphotos d’un mâle, d’un amarante capturé dans les Monts Mandara, au nord-est du Nigeria. Le plumage et le cri de cet amarante sont identiques à ceux de l’Amarante des rochers Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis, une espèce précédemment rapportée de la zone, excepté que le mâle n’a pas la couronne grise typique de l’espèce. Des travaux supplémentaires sur le terrain sont nécessaires pour déterminer s’il agit d’un individu aberrant ou d’une population de l’Amarante des rochers morphologiquement distincte.

  • 2. Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Bilton, David T.
    Fujisawa, Tomochika
    Elliott, Miranda
    Monaghan, Michael T.
    Balke, Michael
    Hendrich, Lars
    Geijer, Joja
    Herrmann, Jan
    Foster, Garth N.
    Ribera, Ignacio
    Nilsson, Anders N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Barraclough, Timothy G.
    Vogler, Alfried P.
    The Effect of Geographical Scale of Sampling on DNA Barcoding2012In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 851-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eight years after DNA barcoding was formally proposed on a large scale, CO1 sequences are rapidly accumulating from around the world. While studies to date have mostly targeted local or regional species assemblages, the recent launch of the global iBOL project (International Barcode of Life), highlights the need to understand the effects of geographical scale on Barcoding's goals. Sampling has been central in the debate on DNA Barcoding, but the effect of the geographical scale of sampling has not yet been thoroughly and explicitly tested with empirical data. Here, we present a CO1 data set of aquatic predaceous diving beetles of the tribe Agabini, sampled throughout Europe, and use it to investigate how the geographic scale of sampling affects 1) the estimated intraspecific variation of species, 2) the genetic distance to the most closely related heterospecific, 3) the ratio of intraspecific and interspecific variation, 4) the frequency of taxonomically recognized species found to be monophyletic, and 5) query identification performance based on 6 different species assignment methods. Intraspecific variation was significantly correlated with the geographical scale of sampling (R-square = 0.7), and more than half of the species with 10 or more sampled individuals (N = 29) showed higher intraspecific variation than 1%, sequence divergence. In contrast, the distance to the closest heterospecific showed a significant decrease with increasing geographical scale of sampling. The average genetic distance dropped from >7% for samples within 1 km, to <3.5% for samples up to >6000 km apart. Over a third of the species were not monophyletic, and the proportion increased through locally, nationally, regionally, and continentally restricted subsets of the data. The success of identifying queries decreased with increasing spatial scale of sampling; liberal methods declined from 100% to around 90%, whereas strict methods dropped to below 50% at continental scales. The proportion of query, identifications considered uncertain (more than one species <1% distance from query) escalated from zero at local, to 50% at continental scale. Finally, by resampling the most widely sampled species we show that even if samples are collected to maximize the geographical coverage, up to 70 individuals are required to sample 95%, of intraspecific variation. The results show that the geographical scale of sampling has a critical impact on the global application of DNA barcoding. Scale-effects result from the relative importance of different processes determining the composition of regional species assemblages (dispersal and ecological assembly) and global clades (demography, speciation, and extinction). The incorporation of geographical information, where available, will be required to obtain identification rates at global scales equivalent to those in regional barcoding studies. Our result hence provides an impetus for both smarter barcoding tools and sprouting national barcoding initiatives smaller geographical scales deliver higher accuracy.

  • 3. Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Brilmyer, Gracen
    Crampton-Platt, Alex
    Nilsson, Anders N
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sympatry and colour variation disguised well-differentiated sister species: Suphrodytes revised with integrative taxonomy including 5 kbp of housekeeping genes (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)2012In: DNA Barcodes, ISSN 2299-1077, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Suphrodytes, is currently regarded as a monobasic Palearctic genus with one colour-variable species, S. dorsalis. Here we show with >5 kbp of nuclear and mitochondrial genes and quantitative morphological characters that Suphrodytes consists of two well-defined species, albeit each with variable colour pattern. The primary barcode gene CO1, showed consistent signs of multiple copies, therefore a range of alternative housekeeping genes were screened for information. The two species were reciprocally monophyletic in genetrees from 12S, 16S, CO1, CO2, CytB, H3 and 18S. Explicit species delimitation tests based on the coalescent process model rejected the null hypothesis that the genealogies originated from a single panmictic species. The mitochondrial proteincoding genes were proportionally richest in information followed by 12S and Histone 3. Conservative nuclear 18S had a single fixed diagnostic character. The two species were significantly different in total bodylength, bodyshape, shape of the male aedeagus and parameres. We review the taxonomic literature of Suphrodytes and find S. dorsalis (Fabricius, 1787) and S. figuratus (Gyllenhal, 1826) to be the oldest available names for the respective species, and for which we designate lectotypes. Synonyms are established for both species which are broadly sympatric across the Palearctic and frequently even collected at the same locality.

  • 4.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Nilsson, Anders N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Bayesian Tests of Topology Hypotheses with an Example from Diving Beetles2013In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 660-673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review Bayesian approaches to model testing in general and to the assessment of topological hypotheses in particular. We show that the standard way of setting up Bayes factor tests of the monophyly of a group, or the placement of a sample sequence in a known reference tree, can be misleading. The reason for this is related to the well-known dependency of Bayes factors on model-specific priors. Specifically, when testing tree hypotheses it is important that each hypothesis is associated with an appropriate tree space in the prior. This can be achieved by using appropriately constrained searches or by filtering trees in the posterior sample, but in a more elaborate way than typically implemented. If it is difficult to find the appropriate tree sets to be contrasted, then the posterior model odds may be more informative than the Bayes factor. We illustrate the recommended techniques using an empirical test case addressing the issue of whether two genera of diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), Suphrodytes and Hydroporus, should be synonymized. Our refined Bayes factor tests, in contrast to standard analyses, show that there is strong support for Suphrodytes nesting inside Hydroporus, and the genera are therefore synonymized.

  • 5.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Subfossil species2008In: Checklist of Beetles of the British Isles: 2008 edition, A.G. Duff, Wells , 2008, p. 164-Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since publication of the Coleoptera volume of the second edition of Kloet & Hincks' checklist of British insects (Pope, 1977), a large number of additions and deletions to the list have been published, as well as numerous nomenclatural changes. In addition, recent advances in our understanding of the phylogeny of Coleoptera have led to major modifications of higher classification in checklists and catalogues that have been published more recently in Europe and North America. In the absence of any widely accepted, modern checklist of the British fauna, British workers have been using binomial names taken from a variety of often conflicting sources.

    It is intended that this checklist should have a wider currency and be suitable for use in future conservation reviews, survey reports and taxonomic dictionaries for biological recording. It is, therefore, vital that the nomenclature used should be widely accepted by coleopterists working on the British fauna. It is also important that the checklist should be as useful as possible to those working at larger scales ranging from European through Palaearctic to the world fauna. It is envisaged that the checklist will be updated annually to keep abreast of published changes and suggested amendments from correspondents. To this end, comments on the checklist are welcome and should be addressed to the Editor by e-mail to andrew.duff@virgin.net.

  • 6.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    BugsCEP, an entomological database twenty-five years on2014In: Antenna (Journal of the Royal Entomological Society), ISSN 0140-1890, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Species found as fossils in Quaternary sediments2012In: Checklist of Beetles of the British Isles / [ed] A.G. Duff, United Kingdom: Pemberley Books , 2012, 2nd, p. 127-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This new checklist is the most up-to-date and comprehensive checklist of the beetle fauna of the British Isles, representing many man-years of effort by leading British coleopterists. The main checklist is fully annotated with detailed endnotes.

  • 8.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Species found as fossils in Quaternary sediments2018In: Checklist of beetles of the British Isles: with a chapter on fossil beetles / [ed] Andrew G. Duff, Iver: Pemberley Books , 2018, 3, p. 171-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Degerlund, Maria
    et al.
    University of Tromsø.
    Huseby, Siv
    University of Tromsø.
    Zingone, Adriana
    Laboratory of Ecology and Evolution of Plankton,Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn.
    Sarno, Diana
    Taxonomy And Identification of Marine Phytoplankton, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn.
    Landfald, Bjarne
    University of Tromsø.
    Functional diversity in cryptic species of Chaetoceros socialis Lauder (Bacillariophyceae)2012In: Journal of Plankton Research, ISSN 0142-7873, E-ISSN 1464-3774, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 416-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cosmopolitan distribution of the marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros socialis Lauder is generally interpreted as a case of wide ecological plasticity. However, cryptic diversity has recently been observed within this taxon and this genetic diversity could extend to phenotypic differences between allopatric populations. Monoclonal strains of C. socialis isolated from NE Atlantic/Arctic and Tyrrhenian Sea waters were cultivated at 2.5, 8 and 13°C, and analysed for morphological, phylogenetic (LSU rRNA gene) and physiological (growth rate, photosynthetic yield) traits. The molecular analysis indicated an unequivocal divergence between the southern and the northern strains. Clear differences in spore morphology between the two groups were also observed, despite their morphological similarity in vegetative form. The physiological data demonstrated a functional partition between the northern and southern strains. The northern strains showed significantly higher growth rates than the southern ones at the lower temperatures, and vice versa at 13°C. Differences between the groups were also observed in the photosynthetic yields. These results reveal the expression of allopatric speciation in several phenotypic characters, providing a functional dimension to the cryptic, or rather pseudo-cryptic, diversity observed within C. socialis. We believe that such an integrated approach is useful for robust taxonomic and functional delimitations of presumed cosmopolitan microorganisms.

  • 10.
    Edler, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, PO Box 461, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Guedes, Thais
    Zizka, Alexander
    Rosvall, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Antonelli, Alexandre
    Infomap Bioregions: Interactive Mapping of Biogeographical Regions from Species Distributions2017In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogeographical regions (bioregions) reveal how different sets of species are spatially grouped and therefore are important units for conservation, historical biogeography, ecology, and evolution. Several methods have been developed to identify bioregions based on species distribution data rather than expert opinion. One approach successfully applies network theory to simplify and highlight the underlying structure in species distributions. However, this method lacks tools for simple and efficient analysis. Here, we present Infomap Bioregions, an interactive web application that inputs species distribution data and generates bioregion maps. Species distributions may be provided as georeferenced point occurrences or range maps, and can be of local, regional, or global scale. The application uses a novel adaptive resolution method to make best use of often incomplete species distribution data. The results can be downloaded as vector graphics, shapefiles, or in table format. We validate the tool by processing large data sets of publicly available species distribution data of the world's amphibians using species ranges, and mammals using point occurrences. We then calculate the fit between the inferred bioregions and WWF ecoregions. As examples of applications, researchers can reconstruct ancestral ranges in historical biogeography or identify indicator species for targeted conservation.

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Ove E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Checklist of the non-lichenized ascomycetes of Sweden2014 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the second edition of a list of all non-lichenized ascomycetes from Sweden, excl. lichenicolous fungi and one-celled yeasts. It enumerates 2935 species in 797 genera and 160 families. For each species is given information on important synonyms and literature where it has been treated, exsiccata, habitats, known distribution in Sweden, and anamorphs. Seperate chapters present Notes, Excluded species, References and an Index to all names of accepted species and genera. Massarina abieticola (Vain.) O.E. Erikss., comb.nov., Niptera bispora Baral, nomen novum, and Neottiella janthina (Fr. Ryman comb.nov. are proposed.

  • 12. Fritsch, Peter W.
    et al.
    Schiller, Anja M.
    Larson, Keith W.
    Department of Animal Ecology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 37, Lund 22362, Sweden .
    Taxonomic Implications of Morphological Variation in Cercis canadensis (Fabaceae) from Mexico and Adjacent Parts of Texas2009In: Systematic Botany, ISSN 0363-6445, E-ISSN 1548-2324, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 510-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taxonomic treatments recognize three varieties of Cercis canadensis: with variety canadensis, widespread throughout the eastern United States, and varieties texensis and mexicana, found east and west of the Pecos River in Texas, respectively. The distribution of Cercis continues southward into northeastern Mexico, but complex variation in leaf shape has confounded straightforward application of varietal names to the Mexican plants. To clarify the taxonomy of Cercis in Mexico, we conducted a morphometric analysis with 281 herbarium specimens, including a representative set of samples from Texas. Correlation and principal component analysis of 12 characters recovered two groups that correspond to the presence versus absence of branchlet pubescence. These groups are geographically distinct at the northern and southern extremes of the focus area but exhibit a large central region of overlap. No other discontinuities in character states were discovered to corroborate this division. Leaf shape varies continuously from ovate-acuminate at the northern and southern extremes to subreniform in the central region, suggesting clinal adaptation to the mesic versus xeric environments in which the plants occur. Based on our data, we apply the varietal epithets mexicana and, provisionally, texensis to Mexican C. canadensis with pubescent and glabrous branchlets, respectively, the latter based on geographic proximity to plants in Texas in the absence of definitive evidence on the phenotypic distinction between varieties canadensis and texensis.

  • 13.
    Huseby, Siv
    et al.
    University of Tromsø.
    Degerlund, Maria
    University of Tromsø.
    Eriksen, Gunilla K.
    University of Tromsø.
    Ingebrigtsen, Richard A.
    University of Tromsø.
    Eilertsen, Hans Chr.
    University of Tromsø.
    Hansen, Espen
    University of Tromsø.
    Chemical Diversity as a Function of Temperature in Six Northern Diatom Species2013In: Marine Drugs, ISSN 1660-3397, E-ISSN 1660-3397, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 4232-4245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we investigate how metabolic fingerprints are related to temperature. Six common northern temperate diatoms (Attheya longicornis, Chaetoceros socialis, Chaetoceros furcellatus, Porosira glacialis, Skeletonema marinoi, and Thalassiosira gravida) were cultivated at two different temperatures, 0.5 and 8.5 °C. To exclude metabolic variations due to differences in growth rates, the growth rates were kept similar by performing the experiments under light limited conditions but in exponential growth phase. Growth rates and maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis were measured and interpreted as physiological variables, and metabolic fingerprints were acquired by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The chemical diversity varied substantially between the two temperatures for the tested species, ranging from 31% similarity for C. furcellatus and P. glacialis to 81% similarity for A. longicornis. The chemical diversity was generally highest at the lowest temperature.

  • 14.
    Huseby, Siv
    et al.
    University of Tromsø.
    Degerlund, Maria
    University of Tromsø.
    Zingone, Adriana
    Laboratory of Ecology and Evolution of Plankton,Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn.
    Hansen, Espen
    University of Tromsø.
    Metabolic fingerprinting reveals differences between northern and southern strains of the cryptic diatom Chaetoceros socialis2012In: European journal of phycology, ISSN 0967-0262, E-ISSN 1469-4433, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 480-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morphology and molecular phylogeny constitute the structural elements of diatom taxonomy. These approaches do not, however, give information on the functioning of taxa. Additional methods to serve a more integrated and wide-ranging taxonomy have therefore been called for. Metabolic fingerprinting is one approach used within the field of metabolomics, often applied in classification of samples. Here we apply metabolic fingerprinting in a taxonomic study of a cryptic diatom species. Strains of the cosmopolitan diatom Chaetoceros socialis from two geographical areas; the north-east Atlantic and Arctic and the Gulf of Naples, were cultivated at three different temperatures; 2.5, 8 and 13°C. The strains from the two different geographical areas exhibited different growth rates as well as different photosynthetic efficiencies. Algal extracts, collected at the end of the growth experiments, were analysed by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The two groups of strains were separated by principal component analysis of their metabolic fingerprints. Analysis of the data revealed both qualitative and quantitative differences in metabolite markers. These phenotypic differences reinforce differences also found for morphology, phylogenetic markers and growth rates, and point at different adaptive characteristics in organisms living under different temperature regimes.

  • 15. Larson, Marilynn A.
    et al.
    Nalbantoglu, Ufuk
    Sayood, Khalid
    Zentz, Emily B.
    Cer, Regina Zing
    Iwen, Peter C.
    Francesconi, Stephen C.
    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.
    Mokashi, Vishwesh P.
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Hinrichs, Steven H.
    Reclassification of Wolbachia persica as Francisella persica comb. nov. and emended description of the family Francisellaceae2016In: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, ISSN 1466-5026, E-ISSN 1466-5034, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 1200-1205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The taxonomic status of the bacterium Wolbachia persica is described, and based on the evidence presented, transfer of this species to the genus Francisella as Francisella persica comb. nov. is proposed. This reclassification is supported by data generated from genomic comparisons of W. persica ATCC VR-331(T) (=FSC845(T)=DSM 101678(T)) to other near neighbours, including Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida. The full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain ATCC VR-331(T) had 98.5 % nucleotide identity to the cognate gene in F. tularensis, with the highest similarity to subspecies novicida. Phylogenetic trees of full-length 16S rRNA gene, gyrA and recA sequences from species of the genera Wolbachia (class Alphaproteobacteria) and Francisella (class Gammaproteobacteria) indicated that W. persica ATCC VR-331(T) was most closely related to members of the genus Francisella and not Wolbachia. Local collinear blocks within the chromosome of strain ATCC VR-331(T) had considerable similarity with F. tularensis subsp. novicida, but not with any Wolbachia strain. The genomes of strain ATCC VR-331(T) and F. tularensis subsp. novicida Utah 112(T) (=ATCC 15482(T)) contained an average nucleotide identity mean of 88.72 % and median of 89.18 %. Importantly, the genome of strain ATCC VR-331(T) contained one Francisella Pathogenicity Island, similar to F. tularensis subsp. novicida, as well as the Francisella-specific gene fopA1 and F. tularensis-specific genes fopA2 and lpnA (also referred to as tul4). In contrast to the obligate intracellular genus Wolbachia, strain ATCC VR-331(T) and facultative intracellular Francisella can replicate in specialized cell-free media. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Wolbachia persica should be reclassified in the genus Francisella as Francisella persica comb. nov. The type strain of Francisella persica comb. nov. is ATCC VR-331(T) (=FSC845(T)=DSM 101678(T)). An emended description of the family Francisellaceae is also provided.

  • 16. Li, Zhen
    et al.
    De La Torre, Amanda R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Plant Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA.
    Sterck, Lieven
    Cánovas, Francisco M.
    Avila, Concepción
    Merino, Irene
    Antonio Cabezas, Jose
    Teresa Cervera, Maria
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Single-Copy Genes as Molecular Markers for Phylogenomic Studies in Seed Plants2017In: Genome Biology and Evolution, ISSN 1759-6653, E-ISSN 1759-6653, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 1130-1147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships among seed plant taxa, especially within the gymnosperms, remain contested. In contrast to angio-sperms, for which several genomic, transcriptomic and phylogenetic resources are available, there are few, if any, molecular markers that allow broad comparisons among gymnosperm species. With few gymnosperm genomes available, recently obtained transcriptomes in gymnosperms are a great addition to identifying single-copy gene families as molecular markers for phylogenomic analysis in seed plants. Taking advantage of an increasing number of available genomes and transcriptomes, we identified single-copy genes in a broad collection of seed plants and used these to infer phylogenetic relationships between major seed plant taxa. This study aims at extending the current phylogenetic toolkit for seed plants, assessing its ability for resolving seed plant phylogeny, and discussing potential factors affecting phylogenetic reconstruction. In total, we identified 3,072 single-copy genes in 31 gymnosperms and 2,156 single-copy genes in 34 angiosperms. All studied seed plants shared 1,469 single-copy genes, which are generally involved in functions like DNA metabolism, cell cycle, and photosynthesis. A selected set of 106 single-copy genes provided good resolution for the seed plant phylogeny except for gnetophytes. Although some of our analyses support a sister relationship between gnetophytes and other gymnosperms, phylogenetic trees from concatenated alignments without 3rd codon positions and amino acid alignments under the CAT + GTR model, support gnetophytes as a sister group to Pinaceae. Our phylogenomic analyses demonstrate that, in general, single-copy genes can uncover both recent and deep divergences of seed plant phylogeny.

  • 17.
    Nilsson, Anders N
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Alarie, Yves
    Michat, Mariano C.
    Larval morphology of Rhantus Dejean, 1833 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Colymbetinae): descriptions of 22 species and phylogenetic considerations2009In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 2317, p. 1-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Descriptions of larval instars of 22 species of Rhantus Dejean, 1833 are presented including a detailed chaetotaxic analysis of the cephalic capsule, head appendages, legs, last abdominal segment and urogomphi. A parsimony analysis including 25 Rhantus species (the 22 species described in this paper + 3 additional ones) from all major zoogeographic regions and representatives of other Colymbetini genera was conducted using the program TNT based on 43 informative larval characteristics. Jackknife values indicate strong support for the monophyly of members of the tribe Colymbetini (Colymbetinae), which is supported by eight synapomorphies. It is postulated that Rhantus is polyphyletic as Rhantus (Nartus) grapii (Gyllenhal, 1908) and R. monteithi Balke, Wewalka, Alarie & Ribera, 2007 occur as more closely related phylogenetically to other genera of the tribe Colymbetini than to the Rhantus species studied. We suggest that the Neotropical species R. orbignyi Balke, 1992, R. antarcticus nahueli Tremouilles, 1984, R. calidus (Fabricius, 1792) and R. validus Sharp, 1882 represent a distinct lineage within the Colymbetini. All these species diverge at the basis of the strict consensus trees prior to all other Colymbetini studied and are characterized by several unique larval character states. Larvae of Palearctic and Nearctic species of Rhantus were found to share similar character states, which is suggestive of a common phylogenetic origin.

  • 18.
    Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilsson, Anders N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Using taxonomic revision data to estimate the global species richness and characteristics of undescribed species of diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)2010In: Biodiversity Informatics, ISSN 1546-9735, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many methods used for estimating species richness are either difficult to use on poorly known taxa or require input data that are laborious and expensive to collect. In this paper we apply a method which takes advantage of the carefully conducted tests of how the described diversity compares to real species richness that are inherent in taxonomic revisions. We analyze the quantitative outcome from such revisions with respect to body size, zoogeographical region and phylogenetic relationship. The best fitting model is used to predict the diversity of unrevised groups if these would have been subject to as rigorous species level hypothesis-testing as the revised groups. The sensitivity of the predictive model to single observations is estimated by bootstrapping over resampled subsets of the original data. The Dytiscidae is with its 4080 described species (end of May 2009) the most diverse group of aquatic beetles and have a world-wide distribution. Extensive taxonomic work has been carried out on the family but still the number of described species increases exponentially in most zoogeographical regions making many commonly used methods of estimation difficult to apply. We provide independent species richness estimates of subsamples for which species richness estimates can be reached through extrapolation and compare these to the species richness estimates obtained through the method using revision data. We estimate there to be 5405 species of dytiscids, a 1.32-fold increase over the present number of described species. The undescribed diversity is likely to be biased towards species with small body size from tropical regions outside of Africa.

  • 19.
    Solberg, Svein Øivind
    et al.
    Nordiskt Genresurscenter.
    Breian, Line
    Ansebo, Lena
    Nordiskt Genresurscenter.
    Persson, Erik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The Department of Landscape Architecture, Planning and Management.
    Cultural relict plants: a living heritage2013In: Nordisk Museologi, ISSN 1103-8152, no 1, p. 24-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural relict plants are remaining populations of plants once introduced for cultivation and use. The plants have survived, even though the population is no longer actively maintained. Cultural relict plants can be found in the close surroundings of historical places such as monastery ruins, churches, castles, fortresses, manors, old farms and villages. The plants are part of a living heritage, but the responsibility tends to fall between different perspectives – between the conservation of buildings, objects and immaterial knowledge (cultural heritage) and conservation of nature (natural heritage). In this article we debate the value of such plants as parts of a place. We list potential species and findings from a project with focus on the Arctic region in the Nordic countries. We furthermore emphasise the need for trans-disciplinary approaches to secure the habitat and increase awareness about cultural relict plants.

1 - 19 of 19
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