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  • 1. Agogo, George O.
    et al.
    van der Voet, Hilko
    van 't Veer, Pieter
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Muller, David C.
    Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio
    Bamia, Christina
    Braaten, Tonje
    Knuppel, Sven
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    van Eeuwijk, Fred A.
    Boshuizen, Hendriek C.
    A method for sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of measurement error in multiple exposure variables using external validation data2016In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, ISSN 1471-2288, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 16, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Measurement error in self-reported dietary intakes is known to bias the association between dietary intake and a health outcome of interest such as risk of a disease. The association can be distorted further by mismeasured confounders, leading to invalid results and conclusions. It is, however, difficult to adjust for the bias in the association when there is no internal validation data. Methods: We proposed a method to adjust for the bias in the diet-disease association (hereafter, association), due to measurement error in dietary intake and a mismeasured confounder, when there is no internal validation data. The method combines prior information on the validity of the self-report instrument with the observed data to adjust for the bias in the association. We compared the proposed method with the method that ignores the confounder effect, and with the method that ignores measurement errors completely. We assessed the sensitivity of the estimates to various magnitudes of measurement error, error correlations and uncertainty in the literature-reported validation data. We applied the methods to fruits and vegetables (FV) intakes, cigarette smoking (confounder) and all-cause mortality data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Results: Using the proposed method resulted in about four times increase in the strength of association between FV intake and mortality. For weakly correlated errors, measurement error in the confounder minimally affected the hazard ratio estimate for FV intake. The effect was more pronounced for strong error correlations. Conclusions: The proposed method permits sensitivity analysis on measurement error structures and accounts for uncertainties in the reported validity coefficients. The method is useful in assessing the direction and quantifying the magnitude of bias in the association due to measurement errors in the confounders.

  • 2.
    Ambarki, Khalid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindqvist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Petterson, E
    Warntjes, JBM
    Birgander, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Evaluation of automatic measurement of the intracranial volume based on quantitative MR imaging2012In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1951-1956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain size is commonly described in relation to ICV, whereby accurate assessment of this quantity is fundamental. Recently, an optimized MR sequence (QRAPMASTER) was developed for simultaneous quantification of T1, T2, and proton density. ICV can be measured automatically within minutes from QRAPMASTER outputs and a dedicated software, SyMRI. Automatic estimations of ICV were evaluated against the manual segmentation.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 19 healthy subjects, manual segmentation of ICV was performed by 2 neuroradiologists (Obs1, Obs2) by using QBrain software and conventional T2-weighted images. The automatic segmentation from the QRAPMASTER output was performed by using SyMRI. Manual corrections of the automatic segmentation were performed (corrected-automatic) by Obs1 and Obs2, who were blinded from each other. Finally, the repeatability of the automatic method was evaluated in 6 additional healthy subjects, each having 6 repeated QRAPMASTER scans. The time required to measure ICV was recorded.

    RESULTS: No significant difference was found between reference and automatic (and corrected-automatic) ICV (P > .25). The mean difference between the reference and automatic measurement was -4.84 ± 19.57 mL (or 0.31 ± 1.35%). Mean differences between the reference and the corrected-automatic measurements were -0.47 ± 17.95 mL (-0.01 ± 1.24%) and -1.26 ± 17.68 mL (-0.06 ± 1.22%) for Obs1 and Obs2, respectively. The repeatability errors of the automatic and the corrected-automatic method were <1%. The automatic method required 1 minute 11 seconds (SD = 12 seconds) of processing. Adding manual corrections required another 1 minute 32 seconds (SD = 38 seconds).

    CONCLUSIONS: Automatic and corrected-automatic quantification of ICV showed good agreement with the reference method. SyMRI software provided a fast and reproducible measure of ICV.

  • 3. Asan, Noor Badariah
    et al.
    Redzwan, Syaiful
    Rydberg, Anders
    Augustine, Robin
    Noreland, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Hassan, Emadeldeen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Department of Electronics and Electrical Communications, Menoufia University, Menouf, Egypt.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Human Fat Tissue: A Microwave Communication Channel2017In: 2017 First IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Bio Conference (IMBIOC), IEEE, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an approach for communication through human body tissue in the R-band frequency range. This study examines the ranges of microwave frequencies suitable for intra-body communication. The human body tissues are characterized with respect to their transmission properties using simulation modeling and phantom measurements. The variations in signal coupling with respect to different tissue thicknesses are studied. The simulation and phantom measurement results show that electromagnetic communication in the fat layer is viable with attenuation of approximately 2 dB per 20 mm.

  • 4. Badariah Asan, Noor
    et al.
    Hassan, Emadeldeen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Department of Electronics and Electrical Communications, Menoufia University, Menouf, Egypt.
    Velander, Jacob
    Redzwan Mohd Shah, Syaiful
    Noreland, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Blokhuis, Taco J.
    Wadbro, Eddie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Berggren, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Augustine, Robin
    Characterization of the Fat Channel for Intra-Body Communication at R-Band Frequencies2018In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 18, no 9, article id 2752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate the use of fat tissue as a communication channel between in-body, implanted devices at R-band frequencies (1.7–2.6 GHz). The proposed fat channel is based on an anatomical model of the human body. We propose a novel probe that is optimized to efficiently radiate the R-band frequencies into the fat tissue. We use our probe to evaluate the path loss of the fat channel by studying the channel transmission coefficient over the R-band frequencies. We conduct extensive simulation studies and validate our results by experimentation on phantom and ex-vivo porcine tissue, with good agreement between simulations and experiments. We demonstrate a performance comparison between the fat channel and similar waveguide structures. Our characterization of the fat channel reveals propagation path loss of ∼0.7 dB and ∼1.9 dB per cm for phantom and ex-vivo porcine tissue, respectively. These results demonstrate that fat tissue can be used as a communication channel for high data rate intra-body networks.

  • 5.
    Bodén, Ida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nilsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Characterization of healthy skin using near infrared spectroscopy and skin impedance2008In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 985-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and skin impedance (IMP) spectroscopy are two methods suggested for diagnoses of diseases inducing adverse effects in skin. The reproducibility of these methods and their potential value in non-invasive diagnostics were investigated. Measurements were performed in vivo on healthy skin at five anatomic body sites on eight young women. partial least squares discriminant analysis showed that both methods were useful for classification of the skin characteristics at the sites. Inter-individually the NIR model gave 100% correct classification while the IMP model provided 92%. Intra-individually the NIR model gave 88% correct classification whereas the IMP model did not provide any useful classification. The correct classification was increased to 93% when both datasets were combined, which demonstrates the value of adding information. Partial least squares discriminant analysis gave 72% correct predictions of skin sites while the combined model slightly improved to 73%.

  • 6.
    Bodén, Ida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nyström, Josefina
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zazo, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Geladi, Paul
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry.
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Non-invasive identification of melanoma with near-infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy2013In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 19, no 1, p. e473-e478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/purpose: An early diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma is of high importance for good prognosis. An objective, non-invasive instrument could improve the diagnostic accuracy of melanoma and decrease unnecessary biopsies. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of Near infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy in combination as a tool to distinguish between malignant and benign skin tumours.

    Methods: Near infrared and skin impedance spectra were collected in vivo on 50 naevi or suspect melanomas prior to excision. Received data was analysed with multivariate techniques and the results were compared to histopathology analyses of the tumours. A total of 12 cutaneous malignant melanomas, 19 dysplastic naevi and 19 benign naevi were included in the study.

    Results: The observed sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were 83% and 95%, respectively, for malignant melanoma.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that the combination of near infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy is a promising tool for non-invasive diagnosis of suspect cutaneous malignant melanomas. 

  • 7.
    Bölenius, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    A content validated questionnaire for assessment of self reported venous blood sampling practices2012In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 5, p. 39-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Venous blood sampling is a common procedure in health care. It is strictly regulated by national and international guidelines. Deviations from guidelines due to human mistakes can cause patient harm. Validated questionnaires for health care personnel can be used to assess preventable "near misses"--i.e. potential errors and nonconformities during venous blood sampling practices that could transform into adverse events. However, no validated questionnaire that assesses nonconformities in venous blood sampling has previously been presented. The aim was to test a recently developed questionnaire in self reported venous blood sampling practices for validity and reliability.

    FINDINGS: We developed a questionnaire to assess deviations from best practices during venous blood sampling. The questionnaire contained questions about patient identification, test request management, test tube labeling, test tube handling, information search procedures and frequencies of error reporting. For content validity, the questionnaire was confirmed by experts on questionnaires and venous blood sampling. For reliability, test-retest statistics were used on the questionnaire answered twice. The final venous blood sampling questionnaire included 19 questions out of which 9 had in total 34 underlying items. It was found to have content validity. The test-retest analysis demonstrated that the items were generally stable. In total, 82% of the items fulfilled the reliability acceptance criteria.

    CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaire could be used for assessment of "near miss" practices that could jeopardize patient safety and gives several benefits instead of assessing rare adverse events only. The higher frequencies of "near miss" practices allows for quantitative analysis of the effect of corrective interventions and to benchmark preanalytical quality not only at the laboratory/hospital level but also at the health care unit/hospital ward.

  • 8.
    Candefjord, Stefan
    et al.
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Combining fibre optic Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance measurement for tissue characterization2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 125801, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue characterization is fundamental for identification of pathological conditions. Raman spectroscopy (RS) and tactile resonance measurement (TRM) are two promising techniques that measure biochemical content and stiffness, respectively. They have potential to complement the golden standard-–histological analysis. By combining RS and TRM, complementary information about tissue content can be obtained and specific drawbacks can be avoided. The aim of this study was to develop a multivariate approach to compare RS and TRM information. The approach was evaluated on measurements at the same points on porcine abdominal tissue. The measurement points were divided into five groups by multivariate analysis of the RS data. A regression analysis was performed and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the RS and TRM data. TRM identified one group efficiently (area under ROC curve 0.99). The RS data showed that the proportion of saturated fat was high in this group. The regression analysis showed that stiffness was mainly determined by the amount of fat and its composition. We concluded that RS provided additional, important information for tissue identification that was not provided by TRM alone. The results are promising for development of a method combining RS and TRM for intraoperative tissue characterization.

  • 9.
    Candefjord, Stefan
    et al.
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Evaluating the use of a Raman fiberoptic probe in conjunction with a resonance sensor for measuring porcine tissue in vitro2009In: IFMBE Proceedings of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Heidelberg: Springer , 2009, p. 414-417Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer and is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in European men. There is a need for new methods that can accurately localize and diagnose prostate cancer. In this study a new approach is presented: a combination of resonance sensor technology and Raman spectroscopy. Both methods have shown promising results for prostate cancer detection in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined information from measurements with a Raman fiberoptic probe and a resonance sensor system. Pork belly tissue was used as a model system. A three-dimensional translation table was equipped with an in-house developed software, allowing measurements to be performed at the same point using two separate instruments. The Raman data was analyzed using principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. The spectra were divided into 5 distinct groups. The mean stiffness of each group was calculated from the resonance sensor measurements. One of the groups differed significantly (p < 0.05) from the others. A regression analysis, with the stiffness parameter as response variable and the principal component scores of the Raman data as the predictor variables, explained 67% of the total variability. The use of a smaller resonance sensor tip would probably increase the degree of correlation. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy provides additional discriminatory power to the resonance sensor.

  • 10. Desmarais, Samantha M.
    et al.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    de Pedro, Miguel A.
    Huang, Kerwyn Casey
    Isolation and preparation of bacterial cell walls for compositional analysis by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography2014In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, ISSN 1940-087X, E-ISSN 1940-087X, no 83, p. UNSP e51183-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bacterial cell wall is critical for the determination of cell shape during growth and division, and maintains the mechanical integrity of cells in the face of turgor pressures several atmospheres in magnitude. Across the diverse shapes and sizes of the bacterial kingdom, the cell wall is composed of peptidoglycan, a macromolecular network of sugar strands crosslinked by short peptides. Peptidoglycan's central importance to bacterial physiology underlies its use as an antibiotic target and has motivated genetic, structural, and cell biological studies of how it is robustly assembled during growth and division. Nonetheless, extensive investigations are still required to fully characterize the key enzymatic activities in peptidoglycan synthesis and the chemical composition of bacterial cell walls. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is a powerful analytical method for quantifying differences in the chemical composition of the walls of bacteria grown under a variety of environmental and genetic conditions, but its throughput is often limited. Here, we present a straightforward procedure for the isolation and preparation of bacterial cell walls for biological analyses of peptidoglycan via HPLC and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC), an extension of HPLC that utilizes pumps to deliver ultra-high pressures of up to 15,000 psi, compared with 6,000 psi for HPLC. In combination with the preparation of bacterial cell walls presented here, the low-volume sample injectors, detectors with high sampling rates, smaller sample volumes, and shorter run times of UPLC will enable high resolution and throughput for novel discoveries of peptidoglycan composition and fundamental bacterial cell biology in most biological laboratories with access to an ultracentrifuge and UPLC.

  • 11.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences.
    Bäcklund, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindahl, Olof A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Evaluation of applanation resonator sensors for intra-ocular pressure measurement: results from clinical and in vitro studies.2003In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glaucoma is an eye disease that, in its most common form, is characterised by high intra-ocular pressure (IOP), reduced visual field and optic nerve damage. For diagnostic purposes and for follow-up after treatment, it is important to have simple and reliable methods for measuring IOP. Recently, an applanation resonator sensor (ARS) for measuring IOP was introduced and evaluated using an in vitro pig-eye model. In the present study, the first clinical evaluation of the same probe has been carried out, with experiments in vivo on human eyes. There was a low but significant correlation between IOP(ARS) and the IOP measured with a Goldmann applanation tonometer (r = 0.40, p = 0.001, n = 72). However, off-centre positioning of the sensor against the cornea caused a non-negligible source of error. The sensor probe was redesigned to have a spherical, instead of flat, contact surface against the eye and was evaluated in the in vitro model. The new probe showed reduced sensitivity to off-centre positioning, with a decrease in relative deviation from 89% to 11% (1 mm radius). For normalised data, linear regression between IOP(ARS) and direct IOP measurement in the vitreous chamber showed a correlation of r = 0.97 (p < 0.001, n = 108) and a standard deviation for the residuals of SD < or = 2.18 mm Hg (n = 108). It was concluded that a spherical contact surface should be preferred and that further development towards a clinical instrument should focus on probe design and signal analysis.

  • 12. Ertzgaard, Per
    et al.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Gerdle, Björn
    Grip, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    A new way of assessing arm function in activity using kinematic Exposure Variation Analysis and portable inertial sensors - A validity study2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 21, p. 241-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Portable motion systems based on inertial motion sensors are promising methods, with the advantage compared to optoelectronic cameras of not being confined to a laboratory setting. A challenge is to develop relevant outcome measures for clinical use. The aim of this study was to characterize elbow and shoulder motion during functional tasks, using portable motion sensors and a modified Exposure Variation Analysis (EVA) and evaluate system accuracy with optoelectronic cameras. Ten healthy volunteers and one participant with sequel after stroke performed standardised functional arm tasks. Motion was registered simultaneously with a custom developed motion sensor system, including gyroscopes and accelerometers, and an optoelectronic camera system. The EVA was applied on elbow and shoulder joints, and angular and angular velocity EVA plots was calculated. The EVA showed characteristic patterns for each arm task in the healthy controls and a distinct difference between the affected and unaffected arm in the participant with sequel after stroke. The accuracy of the portable system was high with a systematic error ranging between -1.2 degrees and 2.0 degrees. The error was direction specific due to a drift component along the gravity vector. Portable motion sensor systems have high potential as clinical tools for evaluation of arm function. EVA effectively illustrates joint angle and joint angle velocity patterns that may capture deficiencies in arm function and movement quality. Next step will be to manage system drift by including magnetometers, to further develop clinically relevant outcome variables and apply this for relevant patient groups.

  • 13.
    Ghorbani, Ramin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Real-time breath gas analysis of carbon monoxide: laser-based detection and pulmonary gas exchange modeling2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Breath gas analysis is a promising approach for non-invasive medical diagnostics and physiological monitoring. Real-time, breath-cycle resolved biomarker detection facilitates data interpretation and has the potential to improve the diagnostic value of breath tests as exhalation profiles carry spatiotemporal information about biomarker origin and gas exchange in the respiratory tract. This thesis presents and scrutinizes a novel methodology for the analysis of real-time breath data, where single-exhalation profiles are simulated using a pulmonary gas exchange model and least-squares fitted to measured expirograms to extract airway and alveolar contributions and diffusing capacities. The methodology is demonstrated on exhaled breath carbon monoxide (eCO), a candidate biomarker for oxidative stress and respiratory diseases. The thesis mainly covers (1) the construction of a compact optical sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) in the mid-infrared region (4.7 μm) for selective and precise real-time detection of CO in breath and ambient air (detection limit 9 ± 5 ppb at 0.1 s), (2) the design of an advanced online breath sampling system, (3) the implementation of a trumpet model with axial diffusion (TMAD) to simulate the CO gas exchange, and (4) the application of extended eCO analysis in clinical studies to establish the healthy non-smoker baseline of the eCO parameters and to study the response to CO and wood smoke exposure. It is shown that the TMAD adequately describes the gas exchange during systemic CO elimination for different breathing patterns, and that there is no difference between eCO parameters from mouth- and nose exhalations. Expirogram shape and eCO parameters exhibit a dependence on the exhalation flow rate, but for a given breathing maneuverer, the parameters lie in a narrow range. Airway CO is close to and correlates with ambient air CO, indicating negligible airway production in the healthy population. The alveolar diffusing capacity is independent of endogenous CO, even after exposure to elevated exogenous CO, and could be used to assess lung diffusion abnormalities. Compared to CO exposure, no clear additional effect of exposure to wood smoke particles on eCO is observed. The discrimination between endogenous and exogenous CO sources remains a challenge.

  • 14.
    Ghorbani, Ramin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Schmidt, Florian M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    ICL-based TDLAS sensor for real-time breath gas analysis of carbon monoxide isotopes2017In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 12743-12752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a compact sensor for carbon monoxide (CO) in air and exhaled breath based on a room temperature interband cascade laser (ICL) operating at 4.69 µm, a low-volume circular multipass cell and wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy. A fringe-limited (1σ) sensitivity of 6.5 × 10−8 cm−1Hz-1/2 and a detection limit of 9 ± 5 ppbv at 0.07 s acquisition time are achieved, which constitutes a 25-fold improvement compared to direct absorption spectroscopy. Integration over 10 s increases the precision to 0.6 ppbv. The setup also allows measuring the stable isotope 13CO in breath. We demonstrate quantification of indoor air CO and real-time detection of CO expirograms from healthy non-smokers and a healthy smoker before and after smoking. Isotope ratio analysis indicates depletion of 13CO in breath compared to natural abundance.

  • 15.
    Ghorbani, Ramin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Schmidt, Florian M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Real-time breath gas analysis of CO and CO2 using an EC-QCL2017In: Applied physics. B, Lasers and optics (Print), ISSN 0946-2171, E-ISSN 1432-0649, Vol. 123, no 5, article id 144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Real-time breath gas analysis is a promising, non-invasive tool in medical diagnostics, and well-suited to investigate the physiology of carbon monoxide (CO), a potential biomarker for oxidative stress and respiratory diseases. A sensor for precise, breath-cycle resolved, simultaneous detection of exhaled CO (eCO) and carbon dioxide (eCO2) was developed based on a continuous wave, external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL), a low-volume multi-pass cell and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The system achieves a noise-equivalent (1σ) sensitivity of 8.5 × 10−8 cm−1 Hz−1/2 and (2σ) detection limits of 9 ± 2 ppbv and 650 ± 7 ppmv at 0.14 s spectrum acquisition time for CO and CO2, respectively. Integration over 15 s yields a precision of 0.6 ppbv for CO. The fact that the eCO2 expirograms measured by capnography and laser spectroscopy have essentially identical shape confirms true real-time detection. It is found that the individual eCO exhalation profiles from healthy non-smokers have a slightly different shape than the eCO2 profiles and exhibit a clear dependence on exhalation flow rate and breath-holding time. Detection of indoor air CO and broadband breath profiling across the 93 cm−1 mode-hop-free tuning range of the EC-QCL are also demonstrated.

  • 16.
    Golriz, Mohammad R
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Matida, E A
    Carleton university, Ottawa, Canada.
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Production of Nano/Micro Beclomethasone Dipropionate particles Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide2005In: Nordic Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics, IFMBE , 2005, p. 156-157Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Halawani, Alaa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Li, Haibo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Anani, Adi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Building eye contact in e-learning through head-eye coordination2011In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 95-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video conferencing is a very effective tool to use for e-learning. Most of the available video conferencing systems suffer a main drawback represented by the lack of eye contact between participants. In this paper we present a new scheme for building eye contact in e-learning sessions. The scheme assumes a video conferencing session with “one teacher many students” arrangement. In our system, eye contact is achieved without the need for any gaze estimation technique. Instead, we “generate the gaze” by allowing the user communicate his visual attention to the system through head-eye coordination. To enable real time and precise headeye coordination, a head motion tracking technique is required. Unlike traditional head tracking systems, our procedure suggests mounting the camera on the user’s head rather than in front of it. This configuration achieves much better resolution and thus leads to better tracking results. Promising results obtained from both demo and real time experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed scheme. Although this paper concentrates on elearning, the proposed concept can be easily extended to the world of interaction with social robotics, in which introducing eye contact between humans and robots would be of great advantage.

  • 18. Henderson, Ben
    et al.
    Khodabakhsh, Amir
    Metsälä, Markus
    Ventrillard, Irène
    Schmidt, Florian M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Romanini, Daniele
    Ritchie, Grant A. D.
    te Lintel Hekkert, Sacco
    Briot, Raphaël
    Risby, Terence
    Marczin, Nandor
    Harren, Frans J. M.
    Cristescu, Simona M.
    Laser spectroscopy for breath analysis: towards clinical implementation2018In: Applied physics. B, Lasers and optics (Print), ISSN 0946-2171, E-ISSN 1432-0649, Vol. 124, no 8, article id 161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection and analysis of volatile compounds in exhaled breath represents an attractive tool for monitoring the metabolic status of a patient and disease diagnosis, since it is non-invasive and fast. Numerous studies have already demonstrated the benefit of breath analysis in clinical settings/applications and encouraged multidisciplinary research to reveal new insights regarding the origins, pathways, and pathophysiological roles of breath components. Many breath analysis methods are currently available to help explore these directions, ranging from mass spectrometry to laser-based spectroscopy and sensor arrays. This review presents an update of the current status of optical methods, using near and mid-infrared sources, for clinical breath gas analysis over the last decade and describes recent technological developments and their applications. The review includes: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, integrated cavity output spectroscopy, cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy, and optical frequency comb spectroscopy. A SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) is presented that describes the laser-based techniques within the clinical framework of breath research and their appealing features for clinical use.

  • 19.
    Hultdin, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Winkvist, Anna
    Department of Clinical Nutrition, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Prospective study of first stroke in relation to plasma homocysteine and MTHFR 677C > T and 1298A > C genotypes and haplotypes: evidence for an association with hemorrhagic stroke2011In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 1555-1562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Abnormalities in homocysteine metabolism have been suggested as risk factors for stroke. The aim of this prospective study was to examine whether total plasma homocysteine concentration (tHcy) and its main genetic determinant, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms, were associated with first ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke.

    Methods: This was a nested case-referent study of 321 ischemic and 60 hemorrhagic stroke cases, defined by WHO MONICA criteria and each matched with two event-free referents for sex, age, cohort, recruitment date and geographical area. All subjects were from the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study cohorts. Odds ratios were determined by conditional logistic regression.

    Results: The mean follow-up time was 4.2 years. Both tHcy and MTHFR were independent predictors of hemorrhagic stroke in multivariate models including body mass index, hypertension and, for MTHFR, tHcy [OR for the highest vs. lowest tHcy quartile 8.13 (95% CI 1.83-36.1), p(trend)=0.002; OR for MTHFR 677TT vs. 677CC genotype 3.62 (95% CI 0.77-17.0), p(trend)=0.040]. Haplotype analyses confirmed that the MTHFR 677T-1298A haplotype was positively associated with hemorrhagic stroke [OR 1.81 (95% CI 1.09-3.00), p=0.022], whereas the MTHFR 677C-1298C haplotype was not significantly related to either hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. Neither tHcy nor the MTHFR polymorphisms were significant predictors of ischemic stroke.

    Conclusion: Both elevated plasma homocysteine levels and the MTHFR 677T allele are indicators of increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke in the northern Swedish population.

  • 20.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurements: a theoretical and experimental analysis2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 055801, p. 8pp-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A piezoelectric transducer in a feedback circuit operating in a resonance state is the basis of a resonance sensor. Upon contact with a soft object a change in the resonance frequency reflects the acoustic impedance. Together with force measurement it is possible to obtain the elastic stiffness of the object. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurement. A time derivative analysis of the force and the frequency change showed that a stiffness-sensitive parameter was independent of the impression speed. Soft tissue phantoms of gelatin were used in an experimental validation of the theory. A force indentation method was used as a reference method for assessing the gelatin's elastic stiffness. Results from the hand-held measurements showed that the stiffness parameter accurately measured the elastic stiffness of the gelatin (R2 = 0.94, p < 0.05). The stiffness parameter was weakly (on average R2 = 0.15) and non-significantly (p > 0.05, 14 out of 17) dependent on an impression speed parameter. On average, a small amount of the total variance was explained by the impression speed. In conclusion, soft tissue stiffness can be objectively measured with free-hand measurement with a resonance sensor. This study contributes a theoretical analysis and an experimental demonstration of the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for stiffness measurements.

  • 21.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Handheld resonance sensor instrumentation towards faster diagnosis of prostate cancer: stiffness measurements on a soft tissue phantom2009In: IFMBE Proceedings of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Heidelberg: Springer , 2009, p. 808-811Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men. Standard methods for detecting and diagnosing prostate cancer are not sensitive enough. Radical prostatectomy is a procedure where the prostate is removed as a treatment for prostate cancer. Objectively measured prostate stiffness could be a clinical marker for prostate cancer and this could be accomplished with a stiffness sensitive resonance sensor. A future handheld pen-like resonance sensor instrument could be a valuable clinical tool for locating cancer during radical prostatectomy surgery and thus aid in the diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept of a handheld resonance sensor for stiffness measurements on a soft tissue phantom. For a handheld resonance sensor set-up the impression depth and speed of the sensor tip into the tissue are unknown. A theoretical model was derived to show that a stiffness sensitive parameter can be obtained independent of the impression depth and the impression speed. The theoretical result was verified on a soft tissue phantom made of gelatin with a silicon tumor inclusion. These results were promising for further studies and development of a handheld instrument towards faster diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  • 22.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Resonance sensor technology for detection of prostate cancer2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men in Europe and the USA. Some prostate tumours are regarded as stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue, and therefore it is of interest to be able to reliably measure prostate tissue stiffness. The methods presently used to detect prostate cancer are inexact, and new techniques are needed. In this licentiate thesis resonance sensor technology, with its ability to measure tissue stiffness, was applied to normal and cancerous prostate tissue.

    A piezoelectric transducer element in a feedback system can be set to vibrate at its resonance frequency. When the sensor element contacts an object a change in the resonance frequency is observed, and this feature has been utilized in sensor systems to describe physical properties of different objects. For medical applications it has been used to measure stiffness variations due to various pathophysiological conditions.

    An impression-controlled resonance sensor system was used to quantify stiffness in human prostate tissue in vitro using a combination of frequency change and force measurements. Measurements on prostate tissue showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) and reproducible differences between normal healthy tissue and tumour tissue when using a multivariate parameter analysis. Measured stiffness varied in both the normal tissue and tumour tissue group. One source of variation was assumed to be related to differences in tissue composition. Other sources of error could be uneven surfaces, different levels of dehydration of the prostates, and actual differences between patients.

    The prostate specimens were also subjected to morphometric measurements, and the sensor parameter was compared with the morphology of the tissue with linear regression. In the probe impression interval 0.5–1.7 mm, the maximum coefficient of determination was R2 ≥ 0.60 (p < 0.05, n = 75). An increase in the proportion of prostate stones (corpora amylacea), stroma, or cancer in relation to healthy glandular tissue increased the measured stiffness. Cancer and stroma had the greatest effect on the measured stiffness. The deeper the sensor was pressed, the greater, i.e., deeper, volume it sensed.

    It is concluded that prostate cancer increases the measured stiffness as compared with healthy glandular tissue, but areas with predominantly stroma or many stones could be more difficult to differentiate from cancer. Furthermore, the results of this study indicated that the resonance sensor could be used to detect stiffness variations in human prostate tissue in vitro, and especially due to prostate cancer. This is promising for the development of a future diagnostic tool for prostate cancer.

  • 23.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Tactile sensing of prostate cancer: a resonance sensor method evaluated using human prostate tissue in vitro2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in men in Europe and the USA. The methods presently used to detect and diagnose prostate cancer are inexact, and new techniques are needed. Prostate tumours can be regarded as harder than the surrounding normal healthy glandular tissue, and therefore it is of interest to be able to reliably measure prostate tissue stiffness. In this dissertation the approach was to evaluate tactile resonance sensor technology and its ability to measure mechanical properties and to detect cancer in human prostate tissue.

    The tactile resonance sensor is based on a piezoelectric transducer element vibrating at its resonance frequency through a feedback circuit. A change in the resonance frequency is observed when the sensor contacts an object. This feature has been utilized to measure tissue stiffness variations due to various pathophysiological conditions.

    An impression-controlled tactile resonance sensor system was first used to quantify stiffness and evaluate performance on silicone. Then the sensor system was used on fresh human prostate tissue in vitro to measure stiffness using a combination of frequency change and force measurements. Significant differences in measured stiffness between malignant and healthy normal tissue were found, but there were large variations within the groups.

    Some of the variability was explained by prostate tissue histology using a tissue stiffness model. The tissue content was quantified at four depths in the tissue specimens with a microscope-image-based morphometrical method involving a circular grid. Numerical weights were assigned to the tissue data from the four depths, and the weighted tissue proportions were related to the measured stiffness through a linear model which was solved with a least-squares method. An increase in the proportion of prostate stones, stroma, or cancer in relation to healthy glandular tissue increased the measured stiffness. Stroma and cancer had the greatest effect and accounted for 90 % of the measured stiffness (45% and 45%, respectively).

    The deeper the sensor was pressed, the greater, i.e., deeper, volume it sensed. A sensing depth was extrapolated from the numerical weights for the measurements performed at different impression depths. Horizontal surface tissue variations were studied by altering the circular grid size relative to the contact area between the sensor tip and the tissue. The results indicated that the sensing area was greater than the contact area. The sensor registered spatial tissue variations.

    Tissue density-related variations, as measured by the frequency change, were weakly significant or non-significant. The measured force registered elastic-related tissue variations, to which stroma and cancer were the most important variables.

    A theoretical material-dependent linear relation was found between frequency change and force from theoretical models of frequency change and force. Tactile resonance sensor measurements on prostate tissue verified this at small impression depths. From this model, a physical interpretation was given to the parameters used to describe stiffness.

    These results indicate that tactile resonance sensor technology is promising for assessing soft tissue mechanical properties and especially for prostate tissue stiffness measurement with the goal of detecting prostate cancer. However, further studies and development of the sensor design must be performed to determine the full potential of the method and its diagnostic power. Preferably, measurements of tissue mechanical properties should be used in combination with other methods, such as optical methods, to increase the diagnostic power.

  • 24.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Andersson, Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Detection of prostate cancer with a resonance sensor2005In: IFMBE Proccedings: NBC'05 Umeå 13th Nordic Baltic Conferenceon Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics, Umeå, 2005, p. 130-131Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Indentation loading response of a resonance sensor: discriminating prostate cancer and normal tissue2013In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 416-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men worldwide. Mechanical properties of prostate tissue are promising for distinguishing prostate cancer from healthy prostate tissue. The aim was to investigate the indentation loading response of a resonance sensor for discriminating prostate cancer tissue from normal tissue. Indentation measurements were done on prostate tissue specimens ex vivo from 10 patients from radical prostatectomy. The measurement areas were analysed using standard histological methods. The stiffness parameter was linearly dependent on the loading force (average R2 = 0.90) and an increased loading force caused a greater stiffness contrast of prostate cancer vs normal tissue. The accuracy of the stiffness contrast was assessed by the ROC curve with the area under the curve being 0.941 for a loading force of 12.8 mN. The results are promising for the development of a resonance sensor instrument for detecting prostate cancer.

  • 26.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindahl, Olof
    Dept of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Instrument towards faster diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer: Resonance sensor stiffness measurements on human prostate tissue in vitro2009In: IFMBE Proceedings of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Heidelberg: Springer , 2009, p. 145-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men and the methods used to detect and diagnose prostate cancer are not sufficiently accurate. Radical prostatectomy is a surgical treatment of prostate cancer where the whole prostate is removed from the patient. Prostate tissue stiffness can be measured with a stiffness sensitive resonance sensor. The aim of this study was to measure the stiffness on the anterior and posterior side of fresh human prostate tissue in vitro and compare these two groups with each other and relate the findings with the prostate tissue histology.  In a prostate tissue slice with mostly normal healthy tissue, the anterior side was significantly harder (p-value < 0.05) as expected. In a prostate tissue slice with areas of cancer tumors, no difference was found between the anterior and posterior sides. However, large stiffness variations were found within groups with measurements points on cancer tissue (coefficient of variation, CV = 42 and 85%), as opposed to groups without cancer tissue (CV = 27 and 28%).  The large stiffness variations could be used as a sign for the presence of cancer. The results are promising for the development of an instrument and method for faster diagnosis on radical prostatectomy samples.

  • 27.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindahl, Olof
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering (Systemteknik), Luleå University of Technology.
    Stiffness of a small tissue phantom measured by a tactile resonance sensor2010In: IFMBE Proceedings of XII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, Heidelberg: Springer , 2010, p. 395-398Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Resonance sensor for prostate tissue stiffness measurements – detecting prostate cancer2006In: World Congress on Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics, August 27 - September 1, 2006, Seoul, Korea, IFMBE , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lindahl, Olof A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Explanatory models for a tactile resonance sensor system-elastic and density-related variations of prostate tissue in vitro2008In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 729-745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tactile sensors based on piezoelectric resonance have been adopted for medical applications. The sensor consists of an oscillating piezoelectric sensor–circuit system, and a change in resonance frequency is observed when the sensor tip contacts a measured object such as tissue. The frequency change at a constant applied force or mass load is used as a stiffness-sensitive parameter in many applications. Differential relations between force and frequency have also been used for monitoring intraocular pressure and stiffness variations in prostate tissue in vitro. The aim of this study was to relate the frequency change (Δf), measured force (F) and the material properties, density and elasticity to an explanatory model for the resonance sensor measurement principle and thereby to give explanatory models for the stiffness parameters used previously. Simulations of theoretical equations were performed to investigate the relation between frequency change and contact impedance. Measurements with a resonance sensor system on prostate tissue in vitro were used for experimental validation of the theory. Tissue content was quantified with a microscopic-based morphometrical method. Simulation results showed that the frequency change was dependent upon density (ρ) and contact area (S) according to Δf ∝ ρS3/2. The experiments followed the simulated theory at small impression depths. The measured contact force followed a theoretical model with the dependence of the elastic modulus (E) and contact area, FES3/2. Measured density variations related to histological variations were statistically weak or non-significant. Elastic variations were statistically significant with contributions from stroma and cancer relative to normal glandular tissue. The theoretical models of frequency change and force were related through the contact area, and a material-dependent explanatory model was found as Δf ∝ ρE−1F. It explains the measurement principle and the previously established stiffness parameters from the material properties point of view.

  • 30.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindahl, Olof A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Prostate tissue stiffness as measured with a resonance sensor system: a study on silicone and human prostate tissue in vitro.2006In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 593-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Europe and in the USA. Some prostate tumours are stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue, and it could therefore be of interest to measure prostate tissue stiffness. Resonance sensor technology based on piezoelectric resonance detects variations in tissue stiffness due to a change in the resonance frequency. An impression-controlled resonance sensor system was used to detect stiffness in silicone rubber and in human prostate tissue in vitro using two parameters, both combinations of frequency change and force. Variations in silicone rubber stiffness due to the mixing ratio of the two components could be detected (p<0.05) using both parameters. Measurements on prostate tissue showed that there existed a statistically significant (MANOVA test, p<0.001) reproducible difference between tumour tissue (n=13) and normal healthy tissue (n=98) when studying a multivariate parameter set. Both the tumour tissue and normal tissue groups had variations within them, which were assumed to be related to differences in tissue composition. Other sources of error could be uneven surfaces and different levels of dehydration for the prostates. Our results indicated that the resonance sensor could be used to detect stiffness variations in silicone and in human prostate tissue in vitro. This is promising for the development of a future diagnostic tool for prostate cancer.

  • 31.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindahl, Olof A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics.
    Resonance sensor measurements of stiffness variations in prostate tissue in vitro: a weighted tissue proportion model2006In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 1373-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men in Europe and the US. The methods to detect prostate cancer are still precarious and new techniques are needed. A piezoelectric transducer element in a feedback system is set to vibrate with its resonance frequency. When the sensor element contacts an object a change in the resonance frequency is observed, and this feature has been utilized in sensor systems to describe physical properties of different objects. For medical applications it has been used to measure stiffness variations due to various patho-physiological conditions. In this study the sensor's ability to measure the stiffness of prostate tissue, from two excised prostatectomy specimens in vitro, was analysed. The specimens were also subjected to morphometric measurements, and the sensor parameter was compared with the morphology of the tissue with linear regression. In the probe impression interval 0.5-1.7 mm, the maximum R(2) > or = 0.60 (p < 0.05, n = 75). An increase in the proportion of prostate stones (corpora amylacea), stroma, or cancer in relation to healthy glandular tissue increased the measured stiffness. Cancer and stroma had the greatest effect on the measured stiffness. The deeper the sensor was pressed, the greater, i.e., deeper, volume it sensed. Tissue sections deeper in the tissue were assigned a lower mathematical weighting than sections closer to the sensor probe. It is concluded that cancer increases the measured stiffness as compared with healthy glandular tissue, but areas with predominantly stroma or many stones could be more difficult to differ from cancer.

  • 32.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Resonanssensorteknik för detektering av prostatacancer2010In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2010 / [ed] Ronnie Lundström, Umeå: Svensk förening för medicinsk teknik och fysik , 2010, p. 193-193Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindahl, Olof
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering (Systemteknik), Luleå University of Technology.
    Hand-held resonance sensor instrument for soft tissue stiffness measurements:  a first study on biological tissue in vitro2010In: IFMBE Proceedings of XII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, Heidelberg: Springer , 2010, p. 463-466Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Johagen, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Svenmarker, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Jonsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Department of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svenmarker, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    A microscopic view of gaseous microbubbles passing a filter screen2017In: International Journal of Artificial Organs, ISSN 0391-3988, E-ISSN 1724-6040, Vol. 40, no 9, p. 498-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the filtration efficacy of a 38-µm 1-layer screen filter based on Doppler registrations and video recordings of gaseous microbubbles (GME) observed in a microscope.

    Methods: The relative filtration efficacy (RFE) was calculated from 20 (n = 20) sequential bursts of air introduced into the Plasmodex® primed test circuit.

    Results: The main findings indicate that the RFE decreased (p = 0.00), with increasing flow rates (100-300 mL/min) through the filter screen. This reaction was most accentuated for GME below the size of 100 µm, where counts of GME paradoxically increased after filtration, indicating GME fragmentation. For GME sized between 100-250 µm, the RFE was constantly >60%, independently of the flow rate level. The video recording documenting the GME interactions with the screen filter confirmed the experimental findings.

    Conslusions: The 38-µm 1-layer screen filter investigated in this experimental setup was unable to trap gaseous microbubbles effectively, especially for GME below 100 µm in size and in conjunction with high flow rates.

  • 35.
    Jonsson, Ulf G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Detecting Inclusions in a Silicone Rubber Phantom Using Standing Lamb Waves and Multiple Frequency Footprints2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis deals with one major question: is it possible, using one piezoelectric sensor/vibrator, to detect a hard inclusion in a silicone rubber phantom? The question was approached with an open mind and the task was subdivided into three clearly identifiable parts: characterization of the piezoelectric sensor/vibrator (paper I), creating a model of the visco-elastic properties of a tissue-like material (phantom) in contact with the sensor/vibrator (paper II), and to detect the presence of a hard inclusion in the phantom (paper III). All vibrations of the sensor/vibrator and phantom was modeled using a finite element method (FEM). To minimize the computational time and to maximize the FEM model's ability to correctly reproduce the vibrations, a two-dimensional model system consisting of a cylindrical piezoelectric sensor/vibrator, emitting radial elastic waves in to a cylindrical disk-shaped phantom, was chosen. The piezoelectric sensor/vibrator was characterized using a parameter tuning procedure using harmonic overtones. The procedure enables tuning of the electro-elastic parameters of the sensor/vibrator so that the measured and calculated impedance frequency responses match. Silicone rubber was chosen as a phantom to mimic soft tissue. The properties of the phantom was modeled using a fractional derivative visco-elastic model. The hyperelastic effect at the first radial resonance of the sensor vibrator was corrected for by a compensating function. The high frequency complex visco-elastic modulus of the silicone rubber was determined using the transitions of standing Lamb waves in the phantom. The presence of a ring-shaped inclusion in the phantom, of polyamide, was detected using the change of the transitional Lamb wave patterns in the phantom. The tuning of the PZT5A1 sensor/vibrator parameters yielded a match between the calculated and the measured impedance spectra better than 0.54%. The average, complex, elastic modulus of three silicone rubber, Silgel 612, samples were: (0.97 + 0.009i) GPa  at 100 kHz and (0.97 + 0.005i) GPa at 250 kHz. The presence of a polyamide inclusion, PA6GPE, was detected in the phantom using multiple frequency footprints.

  • 36.
    Jonsson, Ulf G
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindahl, Olof A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Dept. of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Modeling the high-frequency complex modulus of a silicone rubber using standing lamb waves and an inverse finite element method2014In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, ISSN 0885-3010, E-ISSN 1525-8955, Vol. 61, no 12, p. 2106-2120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To gain an understanding of the high-frequency elastic properties of silicone rubber, a finite element model of a cylindrical piezoelectric element, in contact with a silicone rubber disk, was constructed. The frequency dependent elastic modulus of the silicone rubber was modeled by a four parameter fractional derivative viscoelastic model in the 100 kHz to 250 kHz frequency range. The calculations were carried out in the range of the first radial resonance frequency of the sensor. At the resonance, the hyperelastic effect of the silicone rubber was modeled by a hyperelastic compensating function. The calculated response was matched to the measured response by using the transitional peaks in the impedance spectrum that originates from the switching of standing Lamb wave modes in the silicone rubber. To validate the results, the impedance responses of three 5 mm thick silicone rubber disks, with different radial lengths, were measured. The calculated and measured transitional frequencies have been compared in detail. The comparison showed very good agreement, with average relative differences of 0.7 %, 0.6 %, and 0.7 % for the silicone rubber samples with radial lengths of 38.0 mm, 21.4 mm, and 11.0 mm, respectively. The average, complex, elastic modulus of the samples were: (0.97 + 0.009i) GPa at 100 kHz and (0.97 + 0.005i) GPa at 250 kHz.

  • 37.
    Jonsson, Ulf G
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Dept. of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Britt M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Using Standing Lamb waves and the Finite Element Method to Detect Hard Inclusions in Silicone Rubber DisksManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of an inclusion in a cylindrical silicone rubber disk is determined using FEM, standing Lamb waves, and an algorithm using multiple frequency footprints. Radial elastic waves are emitted into the disk by a cylindrical piezoelectric sensor placed in the center of the disk. The visco-elastic properties of the silicone rubber disk is modeled by a fractional derivative model and the hyperelastic effect at the radial resonance frequency was compensated for. Using the finite element model, the Lamb wave transition frequencies in the impedance frequency response of the sensor was calculated for a specified position of the inclusion. The set of frequencies was named the footprint for that position. The position of the inclusion was varied between 0.05 to 0.95, with a step of 0.01, of the radial length of the silicone rubber disk. For each position, a footprint was calculated. The footprints,s, with corresponding positions, were stored in a database. A positioning algorithm was developed that could match an unknown footprint to a footprint in the database. A self-test of the algorithm showed that the correct position was found for 94% of the tested positions. The results of the positioning algorithm was that the presence of the inclusions were detected, and that the positions of the inclusions at 0.38 and 0.63 were estimated by the positioning algorithm as: 0.45 and 0.74, with relative errors +18% and +17% respectively. The positions are given as the ratio of the radius of the inclusion to the silicone rubber disk radius.

  • 38. Larsson, Anders
    et al.
    Svensson, Michael B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Ronquist, Göran
    Åkerfeldt, Torbjörn
    Life style intervention in moderately overweight individuals is associated with decreased levels of cathepsins L and S in plasma2014In: Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science, ISSN 0091-7370, E-ISSN 1550-8080, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 283-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Adipose tissue cells produce cathepsins L and S, which have proatherogenic effects. Obesity is strongly linked to atherogenesis, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to see if life style interventions/weight reduction could decrease cathepsin L and S levels in blood plasma. METHOD: Study subjects (n=31) were recruited to a life style intervention program aiming at increased physical activity, more healthy eating habits, and weight reduction for most of the participants. Blood samples were collected at inclusion and after 4 and 8 weeks. RESULTS: Cathepsin L was significantly reduced at 4 weeks (p<0.0001) and 8 weeks (p=0.0004). A similar reduction was also seen for cathepsin S at 4 weeks (p=0.03) and 8 weeks (p=0.008). No significant change in fractalkine values was observed at 4 weeks (p=0.58), but a significant increase was apparent at 8 weeks (p=0.0002). CONCLUSION: The intervention program resulted in significant reductions of cathepsin L and S levels in plasma after 4 and 8 weeks of intervention.

  • 39.
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Department of engineering sciences and mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Prostate cancer detection using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and stiffness sensing2015In: 1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering: October 9-12, 2014, Tainan, Taiwan / [ed] Fong-Chin Su, Shyh-Hau Wang, Ming-Long Yeh, Springer International Publishing , 2015, p. 267-270Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer form for men in Europe. A sensor system combining Raman spectroscopy and stiffness sensing with a resonance sensor has recently been developed by us for prostate cancer detection. In this study the sensor system has been used for measurements on two slices of fresh human prostate tissue. The stiffness sensor could detect locations slices with significantly different stiffness contrasts (p < 0.05). Raman spectroscopic measurements could be performed with the dual-modality probe for tissue classification. The findings are important for the continued development of a combination probe for prostate cancer detection.

  • 40.
    Lindahl, Olof A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Ramser, K.
    Bäcklund, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Prostate cancer detection ex vivo combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology2018In: EMBEC & NBC 2017 / [ed] Eskola, H Vaisanen, O Viik, J Hyttinen, J, SPRINGER-VERLAG SINGAPORE PTE LTD , 2018, p. 193-196Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the western world. The most prevalent curative treatment is radical prostatectomy. However, prostate surgery can give unwanted side effects and there is a need for an instrument that can provide decision support to the surgeon during surgery on the presence of cancer cells in the surgical margin. A dual modality probe, combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology, has been used for detecting cancer in fresh human prostate tissue. The tactile resonance modality measures the tissue stiffness and Raman spectroscopy depicts the molecular content in tissue, both related to cancer. After ethical approval, the study investigated the potential of the dual-modality probe by testing its ability to differentiate between normal and cancerous prostate tissue ex vivo. It also investigated the minimal amount of measurement points needed to securely detect cancer on the surface of prostate tissue. Measurements on three prostate tissue slices show that the tactile resonance modality measuring stiffness was able to detect differences between normal and cancerous tissue on a significant level of 90%, but the sample size was too low to draw any firm conclusions. It was also suggested from the study results that the high wavenumber region in the Raman spectrum can give valuable information about cancer in prostate tissue. A number of 24 measurement points were enough for detecting cancer in prostate slices in this study. It can be suggested from this study that combining these two sensor modalities is promising for accurate detection of prostate cancer that is needed during prostate surgery, but more measurements including more prostates must be performed before the full value of the study result can be established.

  • 41.
    Lindberg, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    An improved resonance sensor system for detecting cancerous tissue in the prostate2005In: Proceedings of 13th Nordic Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics / [ed] Ronnie Lundström, Britt Andersson, Helena Grip, Swedish Society for Medical Engineering and Medical Physics , 2005, p. 132-133Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Lindberg, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Hardness measurements on prostate with an improved resonance sensor system2006In: World Congress on Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics, August 27 - September 1, 2006, Seoul, Korea, IFMBE , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lindberg, Peter L
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lindahl, Olof A
    Luleå tekniska Universitet.
    An image analysis method for prostate tissue classification: preliminary validation with resonance sensor data2009In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 18-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resonance sensor systems have been shown to be able to distinguish between cancerous and normal prostate tissue, in vitro. The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of the tissue determination, to simplify the tissue classification process with computerized morphometrical analysis, to decrease the risk of human errors, and to reduce the processing time. In this article we present our newly developed computerized classification method based on image analysis. In relation to earlier resonance sensor studies we increased the number of normal prostate tissue classes into stroma, epithelial tissue, lumen and stones. The linearity between the impression depth and tissue classes was calculated using multiple linear regression (R(2) = 0.68, n = 109, p < 0.001) and partial least squares (R(2) = 0.55, n = 109, p < 0.001). Thus it can be concluded that there existed a linear relationship between the impression depth and the tissue classes. The new image analysis method was easy to handle and decreased the classification time by 80%.

  • 44.
    Lindkvist, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Granåsen, Gabriel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Grönlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Coherent Derivation of Equations for Differential Spectroscopy and Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy: An undergraduate tutorial2013In: Spectroscopy Letters, ISSN 0038-7010, E-ISSN 1532-2289, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 243-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a spectroscopic method that is frequently used in health care and sports medicine to monitor oxygenation parameters in biological tissue. This tutorial provides a coherent derivation of equations for differential spectroscopy and spatially resolved spectroscopy, from basic theories to implementable equations. The basic theories are applicable to any kind of tissue oximeter but mainly focus on continuous-wave instruments. 

  • 45.
    Murayama, Yoshinobu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). College of Engineering, Nihon University, Koriyama, Fukushima, Japan; Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Yoshida, Kenta
    Takahashi, Harutaka
    Mizuno, Jinji
    Akaishi, Kazuyuki
    Inui, Hiroaki
    Softening of the Mouse Zona Pellucida during Oocyte Maturation2013In: 2013 35TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY (EMBC), IEEE , 2013, p. 6834-6837Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A change in the elasticity and the resistance to dissolution of the mouse zona pellucida (ZP) was quantitatively evaluated at immature germinal vesicle (GV), mature metaphase II (MII) and fertilized pronuclear (PN) stages. Young's modulus of the ZP was measured using a micro tactile sensor (MTS), a highly sensitive resonator-based sensor for a micro scale elasticity measurement. 0.25% alpha-chymotrypsin was used for the ZP dissolution assay. The results of measuring the ZP elasticity and the dissolution time clearly showed that the ZP softened during oocyte maturation and the ZP hardened after fertilization. The results indicate that the amount of the zona softening can be a criterion to evaluate oocyte quality for the selection of top quality mature oocyte before in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment.

  • 46.
    Norén, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Andersson, Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Spring-damper model for prostate tissue2005In: 13th Nordic-Baltic conference on biomedical engineering and medical physics, IFMBE , 2005, p. 281-282Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Dept. of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Dept. of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Dept. of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Dual-modality probe intended for prostate cancer detection combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology—discrimination of normal human prostate tissues ex vivo2015In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 198-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the western world. For the first time, a dual-modality probe, combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology, has been used for assessment of fresh human prostate tissue. The study investigates the potential of the dual-modality probe by testing its ability to differentiate prostate tissue types ex vivo. Measurements on four prostates show that the tactile resonance modality was able to discriminate soft epithelial tissue and stiff stroma (p<0.05). The Raman spectra exhibited a strong fluorescent background at the current experimental settings. However, stroma could be discerned from epithelia by integrating the value of the spectral background. Combining both parameters by a stepwise analysis resulted in 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Although no cancer tissue was analysed, the results are promising for further development of the instrument and method for discriminating prostate tissues and cancer.

  • 48.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniksa universitet.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniksa universitet.
    First study on freshly operated prostate tissue using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance sensor technology2014In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2014: Göteborg, 14-16 oktober, 2014, 2014, p. 26-26Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    et al.
    Institutionen för systemteknik, Luleå tekniska universitet, Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Institutionen för systemteknik, Luleå tekniska universitet, Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Institutionen för systemteknik, Luleå tekniska universitet, Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Kombinationsprob för prostatacancerdiagnostik - Ramanspektroskopi i dagsljus2010In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2010 / [ed] Ronnie Lundström, Umeå: Svensk förening för medicinsk teknik och fysik , 2010, p. 166-166Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Ville, Jalkanen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Lindahl, Olof A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    First clinical study of prostate cancer detection with a dual sensor combining tactile resonance technique with fiber optical Raman spectroscopy2013In: 9th Workshop on FT-IR Spectroscopy in Microbiological and Medical Diagnostics, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 64
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