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  • 1. Aarseth, Espen
    et al.
    Bean, Anthony M.
    Boonen, Huub
    Carras, Michelle Colder
    Coulson, Mark
    Das, Dimitri
    Deleuze, Jory
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Edman, Johan
    Ferguson, Christopher J.
    Haagsma, Maria C.
    Bergmark, Karin Helmersson
    Hussain, Zaheer
    Jansz, Jeroen
    Kardefelt-Winther, Daniel
    Kutner, Lawrence
    Markey, Patrick
    Nielsen, Rune Kristian Lundedal
    Prause, Nicole
    Przybylski, Andrew
    Quandt, Thorsten
    Schimmenti, Adriano
    Starcevic, Vladan
    Stutman, Gabrielle
    Van Looy, Jan
    Van Rooij, Antonius J.
    Scholars' open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal2017In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 267-270Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns about problematic gaming behaviors deserve our full attention. However, we claim that it is far from clear that these problems can or should be attributed to a new disorder. The empirical basis for a Gaming Disorder proposal, such as in the new ICD-11, suffers from fundamental issues. Our main concerns are the low quality of the research base, the fact that the current operationalization leans too heavily on substance use and gambling criteria, and the lack of consensus on symptomatology and assessment of problematic gaming. The act of formalizing this disorder, even as a proposal, has negative medical, scientific, public-health, societal, and human rights fallout that should be considered. Of particular concern are moral panics around the harm of video gaming. They might result in premature application of diagnosis in the medical community and the treatment of abundant false-positive cases, especially for children and adolescents. Second, research will be locked into a confirmatory approach, rather than an exploration of the boundaries of normal versus pathological. Third, the healthy majority of gamers will be affected negatively. We expect that the premature inclusion of Gaming Disorder as a diagnosis in ICD-11 will cause significant stigma to the millions of children who play video games as a part of a normal, healthy life. At this point, suggesting formal diagnoses and categories is premature: the ICD-11 proposal for Gaming Disorder should be removed to avoid a waste of public health resources as well as to avoid causing harm to healthy video gamers around the world.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Clinical studies and chemical pathology in normal aging and dementia of Alzheimer type1980Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 3. Ajob, Leith
    et al.
    Brännström, Ingrid
    Ott, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Werneke, Ursula
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (FRCPsych).
    ABC om Wernickes encefalopati2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, no ELZTArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Alem, Atalay
    et al.
    Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital, Addis Ababa. Ethiopia.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Araya, Mesfin
    Kebede, D
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    How are mental disorders seen and where is help sought in a rural Ethiopian community? A key informant study in Butajira, Ethiopia.1999In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplementum, ISSN 0065-1591, E-ISSN 1600-5473, Vol. 100, no S397, p. 40-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One hundred key informants were interviewed about their awareness, attitudes and practices regarding mental illness using the Key Informant Questionnaire developed by WHO. Case vignettes of seven common neuropsychiatric disorders were presented to the key informants. Informants' awareness about these disorders and help-seeking practices for mental and physical symptoms or conditions were assessed. An additional question on the prototype symptoms of mental disorders was also posed. Among the presented seven conditions, epilepsy was perceived as the most common condition and major depression was regarded as the least common one. Schizophrenia was judged as the most severe problem, and mental retardation was considered the second most severe condition. Talkativeness, aggression and strange behaviour were the most frequently perceived prototype symptoms of mental illness. Traditional treatment methods were preferred more often for treating symptoms of mental disorders and modern medicine was preferred more often for treating physical diseases or symptoms. Findings of this study are similar to other studies conducted in socio-culturally different communities. Working in close connection with traditional healers would give the primary health care worker a better opportunity to gain acceptance from the community and modify certain harmful practices.

  • 5. Alem, Atalay
    et al.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hanlon, Charlotte
    Community-based mental health care in Africa: mental health workers' views2008In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 54-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has for long proposed the development of community-based mental health services worldwide. However, the progress toward community mental health care in most African countries is still hampered by a lack of resources, with specialist psychiatric care essentially based in large, centrally located mental hospitals. It is again time to reconsider the direction of mental health care in Africa. Based on a small inquiry to a number of experienced mental health professionals in sub-Saharan Africa, we discuss what a community concept of mental health care might mean in Africa. There is a general agreement that mental health services should be integrated in primary health care. A critical issue for success of this model is perceived to be provision of appropriate supervision and continuing education for primary care workers. The importance of collaboration between modem medicine and traditional healers is stressed and the paper ends in a plea for WHO to take the initiative and develop mental health services according to the special needs and the sociocultural conditions prevailing in sub-Saharan Africa.

  • 6.
    Alem, Atalay
    et al.
    Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital, Addis Ababa. Ethiopia.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kebede, D
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Awareness and attitudes of a rural Ethiopian community toward suicidal behaviour. A key informant study in Butajira, Ethiopia.1999In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplementum, ISSN 0065-1591, E-ISSN 1600-5473, Vol. 100, no S397, p. 65-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One hundred key informants were interviewed regarding their awareness and attitudes toward suicidal behaviour. Eighty-eight informants were male, 58 were Muslim and 42 were Christian. Informants on average, claimed to know more persons who had completed suicide than those who had attempted suicide. Almost all informants mentioned more than one cause for suicide. Of these, frustration was the most frequently mentioned cause. Most informants believed that suicide attempters are cruel, feared and not trustworthy. Their attitude toward suicide completers was expressed as condemned sinners, do not deserve funeral ceremony, and should be buried separately from others. Christians gave importance to the funeral issue more than did the Muslims. Generally, the attitudes of informants were punitive and disapproving.

  • 7.
    Alem, Atalay
    et al.
    Arnanuel Psychiatric Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Kebede, D
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Suicide attempts among adults in Butajira, Ethiopia.1999In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplementum, ISSN 0065-1591, E-ISSN 1600-5473, Vol. 100, no S397, p. 70-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a cross-sectional survey, 10,468 adults of a rural and semi-urban community were interviewed to determine lifetime suicide attempts. Among the study population, 58% were female, 74.4% were Muslim and 79.3% had had no formal education. The majority of the population were in the age group 25-59 years. Lifetime suicide attempt was reported by 3.2% (n = 332) of the study population. Of these, 63% (n = 208) were women. The most frequent age of attempt was between 15 and 24 years and the frequency of attempt decreased with increasing age. Hanging and poisoning were the most frequently reported methods of attempting suicide. Marital or family conflict was the most frequently reported cause for attempting suicide and most of those who reported this cause were women (Chi-square = 17.42; P < 0.001). Men were significantly more likely to use hanging to attempt suicide than women (Chi-square = 8.21; P < 0.001). Among Christians 3.9% had a lifetime suicide attempt compared to 2.9% among Muslims (Chi-square = 6.15; P < 0.05). People who currently had mental distress and problem drinking reported lifetime suicide attempt more often than others.

  • 8.
    Alem, Atalay
    et al.
    Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Kebede, D
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    The epidemiology of problem drinking in Butajira, Ethiopia.1999In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplementum, ISSN 0065-1591, E-ISSN 1600-5473, Vol. 100, no S397, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to determine the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of problem drinking, a total of 10,468 persons aged 15 and above, most residing in a rural district, were interviewed using the CAGE questionnaire as an important element of a general mental health survey. Twenty-three per cent of the respondents admitted that they currently drank alcohol. The prevalence of alcohol drinking was 15% for women and 36% for men. Among those who drank, 16% met the criterion for problem drinking as defined by two or more positive responses to the CAGE. The overall prevalence for problem drinking was found to be 3.7%. Stratified analysis for sex showed that Christian religion, male sex, being ethnically non-Gurage, and smoking were strongly associated with problem drinking in both sexes. Marital status, mental distress and income were found to be associated factors with problem drinking only in men.

  • 9.
    Alem, Atalay
    et al.
    Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Kebede, D
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    The prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of khat chewing in Butajira, Ethiopia.1999In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplementum, ISSN 0065-1591, E-ISSN 1600-5473, Vol. 100, no S397, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A house-to-house survey was carried out in a rural Ethiopian community to determine the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of khat use. A total of 10,468 adults were interviewed. Of these, 58% were female, and 74% were Muslim. More than half of the study population (55.7%) reported lifetime khat chewing experience and the prevalence of current use was 50%. Among current chewers, 17.4% reported taking khat on a daily basis; 16.1% of these were male and 3.4% were female. Various reasons were given for chewing khat; 80% of the chewers used it to gain a good level of concentration for prayer. Muslim religion, smoking and high educational level showed strong association with daily khat chewing.

  • 10.
    Alem, Atalay
    et al.
    Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Kebede, D
    Woldesemiat, G
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    The prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of mental distress in Butajira, Ethiopia.1999In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplementum, ISSN 0065-1591, E-ISSN 1600-5473, Vol. 100, no S397, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 10,468 rural and semi-urban adults in an Ethiopian district using the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ) to detect the prevalence of mental distress and its association with socio-demographic risk factors. Fifty-eight per cent of the study population were women, 74% were Muslim, 79% were illiterate. Those experiencing 11 or more symptoms out of the 20 SRQ items were considered as having mental distress. Accordingly, the prevalence of mental distress was 17%, which is comparable with the previous hospital-based studies in Ethiopia and elsewhere. However, it was higher than the previous community-based studies in Ethiopia. Mental distress was more prevalent among women. Part of the explanation was that women in the study population were older and that they were more often widowed or divorced, which were factors associated with mental distress. Illiteracy, which was more common among women and older individuals, was also independently associated with mental distress.

  • 11.
    Alem, Atalay
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Pain, Clare
    Araya, Mesfin
    Hodges, Brian D
    Co-creating a psychiatric resident program with Ethiopians, for Ethiopians, in Ethiopia: the Toronto Addis Ababa Psychiatry Project (TAAPP)2010In: Academic Psychiatry, ISSN 1042-9670, E-ISSN 1545-7230, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 424-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important issue that underscores such a partnership is the risk of simply exporting Western, America-centric psychiatric training versus creating culturally appropriate models of education.

  • 12.
    Allard, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Gustafson, Lars
    Karlsson, Ingvar
    Björkstén, Karin Sparring
    Geriatric psychiatry in Sweden must be developed--not dismantled: New investigation shows depressing results2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 1-2, p. 36-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Anbesse, Birke
    et al.
    St Paul's General Specialized Hospital, PO Box 31657, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Hanlon, Charlotte
    King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK.
    Alem, Atalay
    Department of Psychiatry, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Packer, Samuel
    University of Toronto, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.
    Whitley, Rob
    Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, New Hampshire-Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Centre, Lebanon, USA.
    Migration and mental health: a study of low-income Ethiopian women working in Middle Eastern countries.2009In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, ISSN 0020-7640, E-ISSN 1741-2854, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 557-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have explored influences on mental health of migrants moving between non-Western countries.

    Methods: Focus group discussions were used to explore the experiences of Ethiopian female domestic migrants to Middle Eastern countries, comparing those who developed severe mental illness with those remaining mentally well.

    Discussion: Prominent self-identified threats to mental health included exploitative treatment, enforced cultural isolation, undermining of cultural identity and disappointment in not achieving expectations. Participants countered these risks by affirming their cultural identity and establishing socio-cultural supports.

    Conclusions: Mental health of migrant domestic workers may be jeopardized by stressors, leading to experience of social defeat.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Claesson, Anna-Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brain responses to olfactory and trigeminal exposure in idiopathic environmental illness (IEI) attributed to smells: An fMRI study2014In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 401-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI) to smells is a prevalent medically unexplained illness. Sufferers attribute severe symptoms to low doses of non-toxic chemicals. Despite the label, IEI is not characterized by acute chemical senses. Theoretical models suggest that sensitized responses in the limbic system of the brain constitute an important mechanism behind the symptoms. The aim was to investigate whether and how brain reactions to low-levels of olfactory and trigeminal stimuli differ in individuals with and without IEI. METHODS: Brain responses to intranasally delivered isoamyl acetate and carbon dioxide were assessed in 25 women with IEI and 26 non-ill controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: The IEI group had higher blood-oxygenated-level-dependent (BOLD) signal than controls in the thalamus and a number of, mainly, parietal areas, and lower BOLD signal in the superior frontal gyrus. The IEI group did not rate the exposures as more intense than the control group did, and there were no BOLD signal differences between groups in the piriform cortex or olfactory regions of the orbitofrontal cortex. CONCLUSIONS: The IEI reactions were not characterized by hyper-responsiveness in sensory areas. The results can be interpreted as a limbic hyperreactivity and speculatively as an inability to inhibit salient extemal stimuli.

  • 15.
    Andræ, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Facing death: physicians' difficulties and coping strategies in cancer care1994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if the treatment of cancer has developed over the last decades 50% of the patients still die of their cancer. The doctor's way of dealing with his and his patient's anxiety must surely be of significance for the treatment the patient receives.

    In the first part of the thesis earlier studies of physicians' stress and ways of coping are reported. There is a lack of systematic studies which show how doctors working with cancer patients adjust to this work. The aim of this investigation is to study cancer doctors' difficulties and coping strategies. The theoretical frame of the study embraces parts of psychoanalytical theory and coping models, emphasizing that both unconscious and conscious psychological processes play their part in the coping process.

    The second, empirical part of the study includes 23 physicians strategically selected out of a population of physicians who work with institutional care and who have daily contact with adult cancer patients. The main method of data collection has been a series of recorded interviews. The focus of the interview was the physician's perception of how he reacts, thinks, talks and acts in different phases of the cancer disease. To illustrate the defence strategies of the interviewers, the projective percept-genetic test, the "Defence Mechanism Test" (DMT) is used. The "Structural Analysis of Social Behaviour" (SASB) has been used to study the doctors' self image.

    The results indicate that the stated difficulties deeply affect the doctor as a human being. The statements reflect conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to authority, conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to frightening and injuring, conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to intimacy/distance. Thirty themes of coping strategies frequently recur and they have been grouped into seven categories. Most of the doctors "seek knowledge" and support from scientific literature. The majority of them state that attempting to "solve a problem" is their main strategy. Most of the doctors "seek support " as a part of their coping strategy. An interesting observation is that the doctors to a higher extent "seek a relation" to their patients rather than to their colleagues. Almost one third use "denial of the severity of a situation" as their main strategy. All the doctors consciously or unconsciously use "diverting strategies", i.e. undertake tasks which are devoid of contact with patients, such as research and administration or other activities which allow them to avoid the patient. One third use "projective manoeuvres" but this is never a main strategy.

    In the third part of the study the credibility of the results and their pedagogical and practical implications are discussed.

  • 16. Angst, Jules
    et al.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Benazzi, Franco
    Gamma, Alex
    Hantouche, Elie
    Meyer, Thomas D
    Skeppar, Peter
    Vieta, Eduard
    Scott, Jan
    The HCL-32: towards a self-assessment tool for hypomanic symptoms in outpatients2005In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 217-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bipolar disorders (BP) are frequently diagnosed and treated as pure depression initially; accurate diagnosis often being delayed by 8 to 10 years. In prospective studies, the presence of hypomanic symptoms in adolescence is strongly predictive of later bipolar disorders. As such, an instrument for self-assessment of hypomanic symptoms might increase the detection of suspected and of manifest, but under-treated, cases of bipolar disorders.

    Methods: The multi-lingual hypomania checklist (HCL-32) has been developed and is being tested internationally. This preliminary paper reports the performance of the scale in distinguishing individuals with BP (N=266) from those with major depressive disorder (MDD; N= 160). The samples were adult psychiatry patients recruited in Italy (N= 186) and Sweden (N=240).

    Results: The samples reported similar clinical profiles and the structure for the HCL-32 demonstrated two main factors identified as "active/elated" hypomania and "risk-taking/irritable" hypomania. The HCL-32 distinguished between BP and MDD with a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 51%.

    Limitations: Although the HCL-32 is a sensitive instrument for hypomanic symptoms, it does not distinguish between BP-1 and BP-11 disorders.

    Conclusions: Future studies should test if different combinations of items. possibly recording the consequences of hypomania, can distinguish between these BP subtypes.

  • 17. Angst, Jules
    et al.
    Meyer, Thomas D
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Skeppar, Peter
    Carta, Mauro
    Benazzi, Franco
    Lu, Ru-Band
    Wu, Yi-Hsuan
    Yang, Hai-Chen
    Yuan, Cheng-Mei
    Morselli, Paolo
    Brieger, Peter
    Katzmann, Judith
    Teixeira Leão, Ines Alice
    Del Porto, José Alberto
    Hupfeld Moreno, Doris
    Moreno, Ricardo A
    Soares, Odeilton T
    Vieta, Eduard
    Gamma, Alex
    Hypomania: a transcultural perspective2010In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the transcultural robustness of a screening instrument for hypomania, the Hypomania Checklist-32, first revised version (HCL-32 R1). It was carried out in 2606 patients from twelve countries in five geographic regions (Northern, Southern and Eastern Europe, South America and East Asia). In addition, GAMIAN Europe contributed data from its members. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to examine the transregional stability of the measurement properties of the HCL-32 R1, including the influence of sex and age as covariates. Across cultures, a two-factor structure was confirmed: the first factor (F1) reflected the more positive aspects of hypomania (being more active, elated, self-confident, and cogni-tively enhanced); the second factor (F2) reflected the more negative aspects (being irritable, impulsive, careless, more substance use). The measurement properties of the HCL-32 R1 were largely invariant across cultures. Only few items showed transcultural differences in their relation to hypomania as measured by the test. F2 was higher among men and in more severe manic syndromes; F1 was highest in North and East Europe and lowest in South America. The scores decreased slightly with age. The frequency of the 32 items showed remarkable similarities across geographic areas, with two excep-tions: South Europeans had lower symptom frequencies in general and East Europeans higher rates of substance use. These findings support the interna-tional applicability of the HCL-32 R1 as a screening instrument for hypomania.

  • 18.
    Araya, Mesfin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Chotai, Jayanti
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Komproe, Ivan H
    de Jong, Joop TVM
    Quality of life after postconflict displacement in Ethiopia: comparing placement in a community setting with that in shelters2011In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 585-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The resilience of post-war displaced persons is not only influenced partly by the nature of premigration trauma, but also by postmigration psychosocial circumstances and living conditions. A lengthy civil war leading to Eritrea separating from Ethiopia and becoming an independent state in 1991 resulted in many displaced persons.

    METHOD: A random sample of 749 displaced women living in the shelters in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa was compared with a random sample of 110 displaced women living in the community setting of Debre Zeit, 50 km away from Addis Ababa, regarding their quality of life, mental distress, sociodemographics, living conditions, perceived social support, and coping strategies, 6 years after displacement.

    RESULTS: Subjects from Debre Zeit reported significantly higher quality of life and better living conditions. However, mental distress did not differ significantly between the groups. Also, Debre Zeit subjects contained a higher proportion born in Ethiopia, a higher proportion married, reported higher traumatic life events, employed more task-oriented coping, and perceived higher social support. Factors that accounted for the difference in quality of life between the shelters and Debre Zeit groups in three of the four quality of life domains of WHOQOL-BREF (physical health, psychological, environment), included protection from insects/rodents and other living conditions. However, to account for the difference in the fourth domain (social relationships), psychosocial factors also contributed significantly.

    CONCLUSION: Placement and rehabilitation in a community setting seems better than in the shelters. If this possibility is not available, measures to improve specific living conditions in the shelters are likely to lead to a considerable increase in quality of life.

  • 19.
    Armelius, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Borderline diagnosis from hospital records:  reliability and validity of Gunderson's diagnostic interview for Borderlines (DIB)1985In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 32-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two trained and experienced clinical psychologists and two nontrained students rated the sections in Gunderson's Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB) on the basis of hospital records for 16 patients (DIB-R). The results showed that both reliability and validity, i.e., correlations with an actual interview, were unexpectedly high, around .80 for the trained judges and around .55 for the nontrained judges. The conclusion is that the DIB may be used for retrospective diagnosis of borderline patients from hospital records.

  • 20.
    Arnesen, Linn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Sober – Then what? You sober up at “TNE”, but what happens afterwards? Does the healthcare do what it is supposed to do?2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 21.
    Asellus, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Nordström, Peter
    Nordström, Anna-Lena
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, R5, Karolinska University Hospital/Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CSF Apolipoprotein E in attempted suicide2018In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 225, p. 246-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cholesterol and cholesterol metabolism, involved in continued neural plasticity, has been associated to suicide and suicidal behavior. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays an important role in the cholesterol metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether ApoE in cerebrospinal fluid was related to severity of suicidal behavior as measured by number of earlier suicide attempts, reversibility/interruptabilty and violent method of suicide attempt. Methods: CSF ApoE and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured in 42 medication free suicide attempters. Earlier suicide attempts and the reversibility of suicide attempt method were assessed with the Suicide Intent Scale (SIS) and the Freeman Scale. Suicide attempts were classified according to violence of method. Results: CSF ApoE levels significantly negatively correlated to the scores on Freeman Reversibility and there was a trend for lower CSF ApoE levels in suicide attempters using a violent method. Patients with at least one earlier suicide attempt (repeaters) showed a trend for higher CSF ApoE levels compared to suicide attempters debuting with suicidal behavior at inclusion in the study. The correlation between CSF ApoE and 5-HIAA was not significant. Limitations: The main limitations to this study were a relatively small sample size and lack of a healthy control group. Conclusion: Irreversible suicide attempts, representing a high risk for completed suicide, may be associated with lower level of ApoE in CSF.

  • 22. Asellus, Peter
    et al.
    Nordström, Peter
    Nordström, Anna-Lena
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, R5, Karolinska University Hospital/Solna.
    Plasma apolipoprotein E and severity of suicidal behaviour2016In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 190, p. 137-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is evidence for association between low cholesterol levels and suicidal behaviour. Since apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is involved in the cholesterol metabolism in both the periphery and in the central nervous system; it may be of particular interest in the neurobiology of suicidal behaviour. Furthermore, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, one of the main biological systems implicated in both suicidal behaviour and early-life adversity, affect ApoE levels. Very few studies have assessed plasma ApoE in relation to suicidal behaviour. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of ApoE in plasma in relation to the severity of suicidal behaviour and life-time adversity in the form of exposure to interpersonal violence in suicide attempters. A total of 100 suicide attempters (67 women and 33 men) were enroled in the study. Information on earlier suicide attempts and age at onset of suicidal behaviour was gathered using the Karolinska Suicide History Interview. The Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale was used to assess exposure to interpersonal violence. Plasma ApoE was measured by immunonephelometry according to accredited routines. Patients with at least one earlier suicide attempt had significantly higher ApoE levels compared to suicide attempters debuting with suicidal behaviour at inclusion in the study. A higher number of earlier suicide attempts was significantly correlated with higher plasma ApoE levels. Age at onset was significantly negatively correlated with ApoE after adjusting for age. ApoE showed a significant positive correlation with exposure to interpersonal violence as a child in male suicide attempters. Our findings indicate that ApoE may be related to stress and trauma and the temporal severity of suicidal behaviour.

  • 23. Athanasiu, Lavinia
    et al.
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Fernandes, Carla
    Christoforou, Andrea
    Reinvang, Ivar
    Lundervold, Astri J.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kauppi, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Eriksson, Elias
    Sundet, Kjetil
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    A genetic association study of CSMD1 and CSMD2 with cognitive function2017In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 61, p. 209-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complement cascade plays a role in synaptic pruning and synaptic plasticity, which seem to be involved in cognitive functions and psychiatric disorders. Genetic variants in the closely related CSMD1 and CSMD2 genes, which are implicated in complement regulation, are associated with schizophrenia. Since patients with schizophrenia often show cognitive impairments, we tested whether variants in CSMD1 and CSMD2 are also associated with cognitive functions per se. We took a discovery-replication approach, using well-characterized Scandinavian cohorts. A total of 1637 SNPs in CSMD1 and 206 SNPs in CSMD2 were tested for association with cognitive functions in the NCNG sample (Norwegian Cognitive NeuroGenetics; n = 670). Replication testing of SNPs with p-value < 0.001 (7 in CSMD1 and 3 in CSMD2) was carried out in the TOP sample (Thematically Organized Psychosis; n =1025) and the BETULA sample (Betula Longitudinal Study on aging, memory and dementia; n = 1742). Finally, we conducted a meta-analysis of these SNPs using all three samples. The previously identified schizophrenia marker in CSMD1 (SNP rs10503253) was also included. The strongest association was observed between the CSMDI SNP rs2740931 and performance in immediate episodic memory (p-value = 5 Chi 10(-6), minor allele A, MAF 0.48-0.49, negative direction of effect). This association reached the study-wide significance level (p <= 1.2 Chi 10(-5)). SNP rs10503253 was not significantly associated with cognitive functions in our samples. In conclusion, we studied n = 3437 individuals and found evidence that a variant in CSMD1 is associated with cognitive function. Additional studies of larger samples with cognitive phenotypes will be needed to further clarify the role of CSMD1 in cognitive phenotypes in health and disease.

  • 24. Bajbouj, Malek
    et al.
    Merkl, Angela
    Schlaepfer, Thomas E
    Frick, Caroline
    Zobel, Astrid
    Maier, Wolfgang
    O'Keane, Veronica
    Corcoran, Ciaran
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Trimble, Michael
    Rau, Harald
    Hoff, Hans-Joachim
    Padberg, Frank
    Müller-Siecheneder, Florian
    Audenaert, Kurt
    van den Abbeele, Dirk
    Matthews, Keith
    Christmas, David
    Eljamel, Sam
    Heuser, Isabella
    Two-year outcome of vagus nerve stimulation in treatment-resistant depression2010In: Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0271-0749, E-ISSN 1533-712X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major goals of antidepressant treatment is a sustained response and remission of depressive symptoms. Some of the previous studies of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) have suggested antidepressant effects. Our naturalistic study assessed the efficacy and the safety of VNS in 74 European patients with therapy-resistant major depressive disorder. Psychometric measures were obtained after 3, 12, and 24 months of VNS. Mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant reduction (P < or = 0.05) at all the 3 time points in the 28-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD28) score, the primary outcome measure. After 2 years, 53.1% (26/49) of the patients fulfilled the response criteria (> or =50% reduction in the HRSD28 scores from baseline) and 38.9% (19/49) fulfilled the remission criteria (HRSD28 scores < or = 10). The proportion of patients who fulfilled the remission criteria remained constant as the duration of VNS treatment increased. Voice alteration, cough, and pain were the most frequently reported adverse effects. Two patients committed suicide during the study; no other deaths were reported. No statistically significant differences were seen in the number of concomitant antidepressant medications. The results of this 2-year open-label trial suggest a clinical response and a comparatively benign adverse effect profile among patients with treatment-resistant depression.

  • 25. Bas-Hoogendam, Janna Marie
    et al.
    van Steenbergen, Henk
    Pannekoek, J. Nienke
    Fouche, Jean-Paul
    Lochner, Christine
    Hattingh, Coenraad J.
    Cremers, Henk R.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Månsson, Kristoffer
    Frick, Andreas
    Engman, Jonas
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Carlbring, Per
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Straube, Thomas
    Peterburs, Jutta
    Klumpp, Heide
    Phan, K. Luan
    Roelofs, Karin
    Veltman, Dick J.
    van Tol, Marie-Jose
    Stein, Dan J.
    van der Wee, Nic J. A.
    Voxel-based morphometry multi-center mega-analysis of brain structure in social anxiety disorder2017In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 16, p. 678-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a prevalent and disabling mental disorder, associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity. Previous research on structural brain alterations associated with SAD has yielded inconsistent results concerning the direction of the changes in graymatter (GM) in various brain regions, as well as on the relationship between brain structure and SAD-symptomatology. These heterogeneous findings are possibly due to limited sample sizes. Multisite imaging offers new opportunities to investigate SAD-related alterations in brain structure in larger samples. An international multi-center mega-analysis on the largest database of SAD structural T1-weighted 3T MRI scans to date was performed to compare GM volume of SAD-patients (n = 174) and healthy control (HC)-participants (n = 213) using voxel-based morphometry. A hypothesis-driven region of interest (ROI) approach was used, focusing on the basal ganglia, the amygdala-hippocampal complex, the prefrontal cortex, and the parietal cortex. SAD-patients had larger GM volume in the dorsal striatum when compared to HC-participants. This increase correlated positively with the severity of self-reported social anxiety symptoms. No SAD-related differences in GM volume were present in the other ROIs. Thereby, the results of this mega-analysis suggest a role for the dorsal striatum in SAD, but previously reported SAD-related changes in GM in the amygdala, hippocampus, precuneus, prefrontal cortex and parietal regions were not replicated. Our findings emphasize the importance of large sample imaging studies and the need for meta-analyses like those performed by the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium.

  • 26. Bas-Hoogendam, Janna Marie
    et al.
    van Steenbergen, Henk
    Pannekoek, J. Nienke
    Fouche, Jean-Paul
    Lochner, Christine
    Hattingh, Coenraad J.
    Cremers, Henk R.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Månsson, Kristoffer N. T.
    Frick, Andreas
    Engman, Jonas
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Carlbring, Per
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Straube, Thomas
    Peterburs, Jutta
    Klumpp, Heide
    Phan, K. Luan
    Roelofs, Karin
    Stein, Dan J.
    van der Wee, Nic. J. A.
    Sample Size Matters: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Multi-Center Mega-Analysis of Gray Matter Volume in Social Anxiety Disorder2017In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 81, no 10, p. S7-S7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Bauer, Amy M
    et al.
    Fielke, Ken
    Brayley, John
    Araya, Mesfin
    Alem, Atalay
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Frankel, Bernard L
    Fricchione, Gregory L
    Tackling the global mental health challenge: a psychosomatic medicine/consultation-liaison psychiatry perspective2010In: Psychosomatics, ISSN 0033-3182, E-ISSN 1545-7206, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 185-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    C-L psychiatrists have the potential to marshal their unique skill-set to reduce the global burden of mental disorders.

  • 28. Beckman, Karin
    et al.
    Lindh, Åsa
    Waern, Margda
    Strömsten, Lotta M. J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Runesson, Bo
    Dahlin, Marie
    Impulsive suicide attempts among young people: a prospective multicentre cohort study in Sweden2018In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 243, p. 421-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We aimed to compare the prevalence of impulsive suicide attempts (ISA) among young adults and those over 25 who present at hospital in connection with attempted suicide. We also aimed to identify factors associated with ISA in young adults and to assess medical severity as well as the probability of repeated suicide attempts in this age group.

    Method: A prospective multicentre cohort study included hospital known cases of suicide attempt (N = 666). The prevalence of ISA was compared between young adults (18-25) and adults aged > 26. We used logistic regression models to identify factors associated with ISA, associations of ISA with high medical severity and prediction of new fatal or non-fatal suicide attempts within 6 months.

    Results: 43.7% of the young patients had made an ISA, and 30.2% among those aged > 26 (p = 0.001). Among the young, substance use disorder was associated with ISA; crude odds ratio (OR) 2.0 (1.0-4.2), and adjusted OR 2.1 (0.99-4.4). Affective disorder and unemployment/sickness absence implied lower odds of ISA. ISA resulted in injuries of high medical severity as often as more planned attempts and non-fatal or fatal repetition within 6 months was equally common (30%) in both groups.

    Limitations: The study was set in psychiatric emergency services, which limits the generalizability.

    Conclusions: Clinicians should acknowledge that suicide attempts among youth often occur without previous planning and may result in medically severe injuries. The probability of new fatal or non-fatal suicide attempts should be kept in mind also after an impulsive suicide attempt.

  • 29.
    Behrens, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Blekinge Centre of Competence, Blekinge Hospital Karlskrona, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Elgh, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Smith, Cynthia
    Williams, Michael A
    Malm, Jan
    A computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus2014In: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, ISSN 2045-8118, E-ISSN 2045-8118, Vol. 11, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A tool for standardized and repeated neuropsychological assessments in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) is needed. The objective of this study was to develop a computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for INPH and to evaluate its reliability, validity and patient's ability to complete the tests.

    METHODS: Based on a structured review of the literature on neuropsychological testing in INPH, the eight tests most sensitive to the INPH cognitive profile were implemented in a computerized format. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was also included. Tests were presented on a touch-screen monitor, with animated instructions and speaker sound. The battery was evaluated with the following cohorts: A. Test-retest reliability, 44 healthy elderly; B. Validity against standard pen and pencil testing, 28 patients with various cognitive impairments; C. Ability to complete test battery, defined as completion of at least seven of the eight tests, 40 investigated for INPH.

    RESULTS: A. All except the figure copy test showed good test-retest reliability, r = 0.67-0.90; B. A high correlation was seen between conventional and computerized tests (r = 0.66-0.85) except for delayed recognition and figure copy task; C. Seventy-eight percent completed the computerized battery; Patients diagnosed with INPH (n = 26) performed worse on all tests, including depression score, compared to healthy controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: A new computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for patients with communicating hydrocephalus and INPH was introduced. Its reliability, validity for general cognitive impairment and completion rate for INPH was promising. After exclusion of the figure copy task, the battery is ready for clinical evaluation and as a next step we suggest validation for INPH and a comparison before and after shunt surgery.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.org NCT01265251.

  • 30. Bejerholm, Ulrika
    et al.
    Areberg, Cecilia
    Hofgren, Caisa
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Rinaldi, Miles
    Individual placement and support in Sweden: a randomized controlled trial2015In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Currently there is no evidence on the effectiveness of Individual Placement and Support (IPS) in Sweden. Aims: To determine the effectiveness of IPS on vocational outcomes among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in a Swedish context. A secondary aim was to evaluate a community integration effect. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with a parallel design was used. Mental health outpatients with SMI were randomized to IPS or traditional vocational rehabilitation (TVR) services. The allocation status was assessor-blinded. The primary outcome was competitive employment. All vocational outcomes were collected continuously, and socio-demographic and clinical variables at baseline, 6 and 18 months. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00960024. Results: One hundred and twenty participants were randomized. Eighty seven per cent were assessed after 6 months, and 73% after 18 months. IPS was more effective than TVR in terms of gaining employment at 18-month follow-up (46% vs. 11%; difference 36%, 95% CI 18-54), along with the amount of working hours and weeks, longer job tenure periods and income. Cox regression analysis showed that IPS participants gained employment five times quicker than those in TVR. Ninety per cent of the IPS participants became involved in work, internships or education, i.e. activities integrated in mainstream community settings, while 24% in the TVR group achieved this. Conclusions: IPS is effective in a Swedish context in terms of gaining employment and becoming integrated within the local community. The welfare system presented obstacles for gaining competitive employment directly and it was indicated that internships delayed time to first competitive employment.

  • 31. Belyhun, Yeshambel
    et al.
    Medhin, Girmay
    Amberbir, Alemayehu
    Erko, Berhanu
    Hanlon, Charlotte
    Alem, Atalay
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Venn, Andrea
    Britton, John
    Davey, Gail
    Prevalence and risk factors for soil-transmitted helminth infection in mothers and their infants in Butajira, Ethiopia: a population based study2010In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, p. 21-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this rural Ethiopian community with a relatively high prevalence of STH infection, we found a reduced risk of infection in relation to maternal hygiene and urban living. Daily use of soap and a safe supply of water are likely to reduce the risk of STH infection.

  • 32.
    Bendix, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences.
    Uvnas-Moberg, Kerstin
    Petersson, Maria
    Asberg, Marie
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Higher insulin and lower glucagon levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in suicide attempters compared to healthy controls2016In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 71, p. 26-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Bendix, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Uvnas-Moberg, Kerstin
    Petersson, Maria
    Gustavsson, Petter
    Svanborg, Par
    Asberg, Marie
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Plasma oxytocin and personality traits in psychiatric outpatients2015In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 57, p. 102-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The oxytocin system is regarded as being of relevance for social interaction. In spite of this, very few studies have investigated the relationship between oxytocin and personality traits in clinical psychiatric populations. We assessed the relationship between personality traits and plasma oxytocin levels in a population of 101 medication-free psychiatric outpatients (men = 37, women = 64). We used the Karolinska Scale of Personality (KSP) and diagnostic and symptomatic testing. Plasma oxytocin levels were analysed with a specific radioimmunoassay at inclusion and after one month for testing of stability. Plasma oxytocin levels were stable over time and did not differ between patients with or without personality disorders, nor were they related to severity of depressive or anxiety symptoms. The KSP factors Impulsiveness and Negative Emotionality were significant independent predictors of plasma oxytocin. A subscale analysis of these personality factors showed significant positive correlations between baseline plasma oxytocin and the KSP subscales monotony avoidance and psychic anxiety. The significant association between the KSP factor Impulsiveness and oxytocin levels observed at baseline was observed also one month later in men. These findings suggest that personality traits such as Impulsiveness and Negative emotionality which are linked to social functioning in several psychiatric disorders seem to be associated with endogenous plasma oxytocin levels. These variations in oxytocin levels might have an impact on social sensitivity or social motivation with possible gender differences.

  • 34.
    Bendix, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Petersson, Maria
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Åsberg, Marie
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Insulin and glucagon in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in suicide attempters and healthy controls2017In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 81, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental disorders and related behaviors such as suicidality and violence have been associated to dysregulation of e g carbohydrate metabolism. We hypothesized that patients after suicide attempt, compared to healthy controls, would have higher insulin and lower glucagon levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid and that these changes would be associated to violent behavior. Twenty-eight medication-free patients (10 women, 18 men), hospitalized after suicide attempt, and 19 healthy controls (7 women, 12 men) were recruited with the aim to study risk factors for suicidal behavior. Psychological/psychiatric assessment was performed with SCID I and II or the SCID interview for healthy volunteers respectively, the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) for assessment of lifetime violence expression behavior, the Montgomery-Asberg-Depression-Scale (MADRS) and the Comprehensive Psychological Rating Scale (CPRS) for symptomatic assessment of depression and appetite. Fasting levels of insulin and glucagon were measured in plasma (P) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Suicide attempters had higher insulin- and lower glucagon-levels in plasma- and CSF compared to controls. Except for P-glucagon these associations remained significant after adjusting for age and/or BMI. Patients reported significantly more expressed interpersonal violence compared to healthy volunteers. Expressed violence was significantly positively correlated with P- and CSF-insulin and showed a significant negative correlation with P-glucagon in study participants. These findings confirm and extend prior reports that higher insulin and lower glucagon levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are associated with suicidal behavior pointing towards a potential autonomic dysregulation in the control of insulin and glucagon secretion in suicidal patients. 

  • 35.
    Bergdahl, Ellinor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Allard, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Depression among the very old with dementia2011In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 756-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among very old individuals with dementia compared to those without dementia and to examine if there were any differences regarding associated factors between people with or without depression in these conditions.

    Methods: In a population-based study in Sweden, 363 participants aged 85 years and above, were evaluated for depression and dementia.

    Results: The prevalence of depression was significantly higher among the people with dementia than without dementia, 43% vs. 24% (p < 0.001). Approximately 2/3 of the depressed in both groups used antidepressants and of those, approximately 50% had responded. Depression in the group without dementia was, among other factors, associated with higher total number of medication, the use of significant more analgesics and benzodiazepines, loneliness, inability of going outside and recent loss of child. The loss of a child was the only factor that was independently associated with depression in those with dementia.

    Conclusions: The present study confirms that in the very old, depression is more common among people with dementia than without dementia. A large proportion, both with and without dementia, are under-diagnosed and untreated, and in addition many subjects in both groups studied were non-responders to treatment. Many of the factors associated with depression among people without dementia in this study were not associated with depression among those with dementia, thus supporting the theory that the spectrum of associated factors for depression in dementia seems to be different from that for depression in people without dementia.

  • 36.
    Bergenheim, Tommy A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Larsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Selective peripheral denervation for cervical dystonia: long-term follow-up2015In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 86, no 12, p. 1307-1313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: 61 procedures with selective peripheral denervation for cervical dystonia were retrospectively analysed concerning surgical results, pain, quality of life (QoL) and recurrences.

    METHODS: The patients were assessed with the Tsui torticollis scale, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain and Fugl-Meyer scale for QoL. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, early postoperatively, at 6 months, then at a mean of 42 (13-165) months. All patients underwent electromyogram at baseline, which was repeated in cases who presented with recurrence of symptoms after surgery.

    RESULTS: Six months of follow-up was available for 55 (90%) of the procedures and late follow-up for 34 (56%). The mean score of the Tsui scale was 10 preoperatively. It improved to 4.5 (p<0.001) at 6 months, and 5.3 (p<0.001) at late follow-up. VAS for pain improved from 6.5 preoperatively to 4.2 (p<0.001) at 6 months and 4 (p<0.01) at late follow-up. The Fugl-Meyer score for QoL improved from 43.3 to 46.6 (p<0.05) at 6 months, and to 51.1 (p<0.05) at late follow-up. Major reinnervation and/or change in the dystonic pattern occurred following 29% of the procedures, and led in 26% of patients to reoperation with either additional denervation or pallidal stimulation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Selective peripheral denervation remains a surgical option in the treatment of cervical dystonia when conservative measures fail. Although the majority of patients experience a significant relief of symptoms, there is a substantial risk of reinnervation and/or change in the pattern of the cervical dystonia.

  • 37. Bergenmar, Jenny
    et al.
    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lönngren, Ann-Sofie
    Autism and the Question of the Human2015In: Literature and medicine, ISSN 0278-9671, E-ISSN 1080-6571, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 202-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how normative notions of emotions and interaction are active in constructions of the categories of "human" and "animal" in different discourses about autism: scientific and autobiographical. In the scientific discourse of autistic emotionality, a deficit perspective of autism is central. The general affective deficit discourse relies on normative discursive notions of "humanity" or "human emotionality." Thus, neurotypicals are produced as real "humans" and neurotypical emotionality as "normal" human emotionality. This human normativity is challenged in the Swedish autobiographical texts by Gunilla Gerland (b. 1963), Iris Johansson (b. 1945) and Immanuel Brändemo (b. 1980). Along with American authors of autobiographies about autism, such as Temple Grandin's Thinking in Pictures (1995) and Dawn Prince-Hughes' Songs of the Gorilla Nation (2004) they destabilize the categories of "human" and "animal" by identifying with nonhuman animals, describing themselves as such, or feeling disqualified as real humans.

  • 38. Bergman, Olle
    et al.
    Westberg, Lars
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Eriksson, Elias
    Preliminary evidence that polymorphisms in dopamine-related transcription factors LMX1A, LMX1B and PITX3 are associated with schizophrenia2010In: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0278-5846, E-ISSN 1878-4216, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1094-1097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early development of dopaminergic pathways has been attributed importance for the aetiology of schizophrenia. Several transcription factors are involved in the survival and maturation of dopamine neurons, including LMX1A, LMX1B and PITX3. The possibility that polymorphisms in these genes may influence the development and/or the maintenance of dopaminergic neurons prompted us to investigate if five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously linked to Parkinson's disease are associated with this disorder. Preliminary evidence that genetic variation in LMX1A (rs6668493, rs4657411), LMX1B (rs10987386) and PITX3 (rs4919621) may increase the risk of developing schizophrenia is presented.

  • 39.
    Bergmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Integrerade psykosociala insatser: Policy, implementering och praktik i ett komplext verksamhetsfält2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Since the deinstitutionalization of psychiatry started in the 1980’s, the field of psychiatry has moved in the direction of community-based psychosocial interventions for people with mental illnesses. The interventions selected should be based on knowledge and evidence, and support the users’ empowerment and recovery. In addition, some of the services should be provided in forms of integrated models, meaning that all agencies involved should provide cohesive care and support. Two examples of such interventions are the occupational rehabilitation program Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and the intensive case management model Assertive Community Treatment (ACT). Although Sweden is considered a high-resource country, the availability of psychosocial services has been criticized. This criticism has been related to policymaking as well as the quality of the services provided. Examples of areas considered problematic include collaboration deficiencies among disparate human service organizations and substantial local variations in available types of services. This thesis aims to examine how national-level policymakers in Sweden have handled the development of psychosocial support and to analyze facilitators and barriers experienced by these organizations in their implementation of community-based and integrated models. The research questions are as follows:

    -       How have policies concerning community-based psychosocial interventions been formulated and how do the characteristics of these policies affect the implementation of its goals?

    -       How do different types of steering strategies influence national-level policy implementation proposals?

    -       Which facilitators and barriers to effective implementation of proposed integrated interventions can be identified?

    -       How can the ability to provide integrated psychosocial interventions be explained in terms of local conditions and strategies used for implementation?

    Methods

    A study of community mental health policy covering three of the major documents published at the national level from the last 20 years was performed. Directed content analysis based on literature relevant for the research area was used. In order to study the implementation of the selected interventions, 15 programs were followed for a three-year period. 14 of these programs were implementing IPS and the other one implemented ACT. In order to monitor the programs’ adherence to the selected models, program fidelity assessments were performed. Data on the programs’ target groups were collected. Three of the IPS-programs participated in an in-depth study where qualitative interviews with leaders, staff, and collaboration partners were performed. The implementation of the three programs were analyzed utilizing the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. All of the 14 IPS programs were included in an implementation study where the Sustainable Implementation Scale (SIS) was used to identify facilitators and barriers to implementation. In the study of the ACT team, qualitative directed content analysis of in-depth interviews and SIS-assessments were performed. After three years, the sustainability of all programs was assessed.

    Results

    Mental health policies have involved high levels of ambiguity and conflict in relation to both the goals and the means. The government has prioritized soft steering strategies, usually in the form of financial stimulus grants. Over time, these policies have (at least to some degree) been clearer when psychosocial interventions are being described. In addition, the development of policy has led to harder steering strategies, illustrated by targeted and performance-based grants and the advocacy of national guidelines to steer agencies towards preferred interventions. Despite these changes, independent agencies are still responsible for selection, framing, and implementation of the interventions.

    Implementation of the integrated models IPS and ACT is possible, even in the context of a sectored welfare system such as Sweden.  However, there are a number of implementation barriers at the organizational and team levels. Obstructive factions include involved agencies disparate traditions and regulations, as well as the programs’ difficulties in securing long-term funding. Some of the staff interviewed considered the characteristics of the interventions as problematic since they challenged existing routines and views about support of the target group. Another critical component was the ability to establish collaboration, both horizontally (with partners at the same hierarchical level), and vertically (between management and staff). A team leader with the mandate to influence interactions horizontally and vertically is therefore a facilitating factor. In most of the programs that managed to perform a sustainable implementation of the models, a critical success factor was found to be staffs’ ability to navigate around a variety of barriers. Additional facilitators to successful implementation was careful planning before the start-up of a program, effective staff recruitment, the formation of a dedicated steering group, and a plan for local funding early in the implementation process. Regularly-performed program fidelity assessments were also noted as an important means to identify improvement opportunities for the programs. Collectively, these components served as tools to increase the programs’ legitimacy since the team leaders used them to provide feedback to the local decision makers.

    Conclusions

    At an abstract level, there is general agreement of the overarching needs in the area of integrated psychosocial interventions, but there are discrepancies when it comes to how to best convert this shared definition of need into concrete psychosocial interventions. The majority of steering strategies used are still considered ‘soft’, which leaves much of the responsibility to the implementing agencies.  At a grass-root level this leads to several difficulties, including unclear responsibility definitions and collaboration challenges between agencies. Instead of prioritizing the work with their clients, the staff are forced to put a lot of time and energy into solving these problems.

    In most cases, team leaders and staff are able to reach high program fidelity at a team level. However, a sustainable implementation demands that a program has been anchored both vertically and horizontally. There is a need for a holistic approach by researchers and decision makers, both in the area of policymaking and implementation of selected psychosocial interventions. Assessments of program fidelity and implementation have the potential to help agencies identify strengths and opportunities for growth both within each entity and between involved organizations. In order to implement the selected models successfully at an organizational level, the programs´ vertical legitimacy has to increase, and plans for long-term local funding strategies have to be initiated early in the implementation process.

  • 40.
    Bhoomikumar, Jegannathan
    et al.
    Center for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Chey Chumneas Hospital, Cambodia .
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Gender difference in suicidal expressions and it's determinants among young people in Cambodia, a post-conflict country2011In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 47-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Suicide among young people is a global public health problem, but adequate information on determinants of suicidal expression is lacking in middle and low income countries. Young people in transitional economies are vulnerable to psychosocial stressors and suicidal expressions. This study explores the suicidal expressions and their determinants among high school students in Cambodia, with specific focus on gender differences.

    METHODS: A sample of 320 young people, consisting of 153 boys and 167 girls between 15-18 years of age, was randomly selected from two high schools in Cambodia. Their self-reported suicidal expressions, mental health problems, life-skills dimensions, and exposure to suicidal behavior in others were measured using the Youth Self-Report (YSR), Life-Skills Development Scale (LSDS)-Adolescent Form, and Attitude Towards Suicide (ATTS) questionnaires.

    RESULTS: Suicidal plans were reported more often by teenage boys than teenage girls (M=17.3%, F=5.6%, p=0.001), whereas girls reported more attempts (M=0.6%, F=7.8%, p=0.012). Young men scored significantly higher on rule-breaking behavior than young women (p=0.001), whereas young women scored higher on anxious/depression (p=0.000), withdrawn/depression (p=0.002), somatic complaints (p=0.034), social problems (p=0.006), and internalizing syndrome (p=0.000). Young men exposed to suicide had significantly higher scores for internalizing syndrome compared to those unexposed (p=0.001), while young women exposed to suicide scored significantly higher on both internalizing (p=0.001) and externalizing syndromes (p=0.012). Any type of exposure to suicidal expressions increased the risk for own suicidal expressions in both genders (OR=2.04, 95% CI=1.06-3.91); among young women, however, those exposed to suicide among friends and partners were at greater risk for the serious suicidal expressions (OR=2.79, 95% CI=1.00-7.74). Life skills dimension scores inversely correlated with externalizing syndrome in young men (p=0.026) and internalizing syndrome in young women (p=0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: The significant gender differences in suicidal expressions and their determinants in Cambodian teenagers highlight the importance of culturally appropriate and gender-specific suicide prevention programs. School-based life skills promotion may indirectly influence the determinants for suicidal expressions, particularly among young women with internalizing syndrome in Cambodia.

  • 41. Bihlar Muld, Berit
    et al.
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Bölte, Sven
    Hirvikoski, Tatja
    Long-term outcomes of pharmacologically treated versus non-treated adults with ADHD and substance use disorder: a naturalistic study2015In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, ISSN 0740-5472, E-ISSN 1873-6483, Vol. 51, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pharmacological treatment of individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and severe substance use disorder (SUD) is controversial, and few studies have examined the long-term psychosocial outcome of these treatments. Our aim was to investigate whether pharmacological treatment was associated with improved long-term psychosocial outcomes.

    METHODS: The present naturalistic study consisted of a long-term follow-up of 60 male patients with ADHD and comorbid severe SUD; all participants had received compulsory inpatient treatment due to severe substance abuse. The average interval between inpatient discharge and follow-up was 18.4months. Thirty patients had received pharmacological treatment for ADHD, and 30 patients were pharmacologically untreated. The groups were compared with respect to mortality and psychosocial outcomes operationalized as substance abuse status, ongoing voluntary rehabilitation, current housing situation and employment status.

    RESULTS: The groups were comparable with regard to the demographic and background characteristics. Overall, mortality was high; 8.3% of the participants had deceased at follow-up (one in the pharmacologically treated group and four in the untreated group; the between-group difference was not significant). The group that received pharmacological treatment for ADHD exhibited fewer substance abuse relapses, received more frequently voluntary treatments in accordance with a rehabilitation plan, required less frequent compulsory care, were more frequently accommodated in supportive housing or a rehabilitation center, and displayed a higher employment rate than the non-treated group.

    CONCLUSIONS: The recommendations for the close clinical monitoring of high-risk populations and the prevention of misuse and drug diversion were fulfilled in the structured environment of compulsory care for the treated group. Pharmacological treatment of ADHD in individuals with severe SUD may decrease the risk of relapse and increase these patients' ability to follow a non-pharmacological rehabilitation plan, thereby improving their long-term outcomes.

  • 42. Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Nyberg, Ullakarin
    Lambe, Mats
    Bratt, Ola
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Psychiatric treatment in men with prostate cancer: results from a Nation-wide, population-based cohort study from PCBaSe Sweden.2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, no 14, p. 2195-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore whether the self-reported psychological distress among men with prostate cancer was to the extent that it required psychiatric treatment.

    Methods: PCBaSe Sweden, a merged database based on the National Prostate Cancer Register including 97% of allprostate cancers registered as well as age-matched controls. We calculated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals to compare risks of psychiatric treatment due to depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disordercontrolling for age and socio-economic factors. We used odds ratios to compare use or no use of antidepressants.

    Findings: In total 72,613 men with prostate cancer and 217,839 men without prostate cancer were included for analyses. Psychiatric hospitalisation due to depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder were significantly increased (RR 1.29, (95% CI 1.14–1.45), RR 1.42 (95% CI 1.12–1.80) and RR 1.61 (95% CI 1.16–2.24), respectively). However, hospitalisations due to anxiety were only increased in men with more advanced tumours RR 2.28 (95% CI 1.45–3.57). The use of antidepressants was increased for all men with prostate cancer RR 1.65 (95% CI 1.54–1.77) and treatment strategies RR 1.93 (95% CI 1.75–2.13).

    Interpretation: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer had increased risk of psychiatric treatment for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and use of antidepressants regardless of risk group and treatment strategy compared to age-matched controls, whilst more advanced prostate cancer was associated with severe anxiety disorders.

  • 43. Binzer, MN
    et al.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    [Psychogenic paralysis. A prospective study].2000In: Ugeskrift for læger, ISSN 0041-5782, E-ISSN 1603-6824, Vol. 162, no 42, p. 5632-5636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [da]

    The results of this study stresses the need for careful and well-conducted neurological and psychiatric assessments in patients with psychogenic paralyses, bearing in mind the substantial possibility for coinciding illnesses. If this is ensured, it appears that the risk of subsequent neurological rediagnosis is negligible.

  • 44. Bjureberg, Johan
    et al.
    Sahlin, Hanna
    Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik
    Gratz, Kim L.
    Tull, Matthew T.
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Norra stationsgatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellner, Clara
    Ljótsson, Brjánn
    Extending research on Emotion Regulation Individual Therapy for Adolescents (ERITA) with nonsuicidal self-injury disorder: open pilot trial and mediation analysis of a novel online version2018In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 18, article id 326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is common among adolescents and associated with negative outcomes. However, treatments developed specifically for NSSI and the proposed NSSI disorder (NSSID) are scarce, and access to empirically supported treatments for NSSI in many areas is limited. Online treatments carry the potential to increase the availability of evidence-based treatments. Emotion regulation individual therapy for adolescents (ERITA) has shown promise in the treatment of adolescents with NSSID.

    Method: The present study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and utility of an online version of ERITA. Twenty-five adolescents (aged 13-17) with NSSID and their parents were included in an uncontrolled open trial. Self-report and clinician-rated assessments of outcomes such as NSSI, self-destructive behaviors, emotion dysregulation, and global functioning were administered at pre-treatment, post-treatment, 3- and 6- month follow-up. Measures of NSSI, self-destructive behaviors, and emotion dysregulation were also assessed weekly during treatment.

    Results: Ratings of treatment credibility, expectancy, and satisfaction were acceptable, and the therapeutic alliance and treatment completion rate (96%) were high. Adolescent participation in the treatment was associated with a statistically significant increase in past-month NSSI abstinence (p = .007), large-sized improvements in past-month NSSI frequency (55% reduction, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 29, 72; Cohen's d = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.73, 1.06) and global functioning (d = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.77, 1.32), and medium-sized improvements in emotion dysregulation (d = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.90) and NSSI versatility (d = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.77) from pre- to post-treatment. These improvements were further strengthened at 3-month follow-up and maintained at 6-month follow-up. The online therapist-guided parent program was associated with small-to large-sized (ds = 0.47-1.22) improvements in adaptive parent behaviors, and these improvements were maintained or further improved upon at 6-month follow-up. Moreover, in line with the theoretical model underlying ERITA, change in emotion dysregulation mediated changes in both NSSI frequency and self-destructive behaviors over the course of treatment.

    Conclusions: Together, results suggest that online ERITA is an acceptable, feasible, and promising low-intensity treatment for adolescents with NSSID. The results of this open trial must be replicated in controlled studies.

  • 45. Bjureberg, Johan
    et al.
    Sahlin, Hanna
    Hellner, Clara
    Hedman-Lagerlof, Erik
    Gratz, Kim L.
    Bjarehed, Jonas
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Norra Stationsgatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tull, Matthew T.
    Ljotsson, Brjann
    Emotion regulation individual therapy for adolescents with nonsuicidal self-injury disorder: a feasibility study2017In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, article id 411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a serious health risk behavior that forms the basis of a tentative diagnosis in DSM-5, NSSI Disorder (NSSID). To date, established treatments specific to NSSI or NSSID are scarce. As a first step in evaluating the feasibility, acceptability, and utility of a novel treatment for adolescents with NSSID, we conducted an open trial of emotion regulation individual therapy for adolescents (ERITA): a 12-week, behavioral treatment aimed at directly targeting both NSSI and its proposed underlying mechanism of emotion regulation difficulties.

    Methods: Seventeen girls (aged 13–17; mean = 15.31) with NSSID were enrolled in a study adopting an uncontrolled open trial design with self-report and clinician-rated assessments of NSSI and other self-destructive behaviors, emotion regulation difficulties, borderline personality features, and global functioning administered at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Measures of NSSI and emotion regulation difficulties were also administered weekly during treatment.

    Results: Ratings of treatment credibility and expectancy and the treatment completion rate (88%) were satisfactory, and both therapeutic alliance and treatment attendance were strong. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed significant improvements associated with large effect sizes in past-month NSSI frequency, emotion regulation difficulties, self-destructive behaviors, and global functioning, as well as a medium effect size in past-month NSSI versatility, from pre- to post-treatment. Further, all of these improvements were either maintained or further improved upon at 6-month follow-up. Finally, change in emotion regulation difficulties mediated improvements in NSSI over the course of treatment.

    Conclusions: Results suggest the acceptability, feasibility, and utility of this treatment for adolescents with NSSID.

  • 46.
    Bjurman, Ranja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    DO ANTI-STIGMA CAMPAIGNS MATTER? - SELF-PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AMONG PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS - three years after "(H)järnkoll".2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 47. Björkenstam, Charlotte
    et al.
    Tinghög, Petter
    Brenner, Philip
    Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor
    Hillert, Jan
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Is disability pension a risk indicator for future need of psychiatric healthcare or suicidal behavior among MS patients: a nationwide register study in Sweden?2015In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 15, article id 286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mental disorders and suicidal behavior are common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), they also carry a higher risk of disability pension (DP). Our aim was to investigate if DP and other factors are associated with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior among MS patients, and whether DP is a stronger risk indicator among certain groups.

    METHOD: A prospective population-based cohort study with six-year follow-up (2005-2010), including 11 346 MS patients who in 2004 were aged 16-64 and lived in Sweden. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.

    RESULTS: MS patients on DP had a modestly higher risk of requiring psychiatric healthcare, IRR: 1.36 (95 % CI: 1.18-1.58). MS patients with previous psychiatric healthcare had a higher IRR for both psychiatric healthcare and suicidal behavior; 2.32 (2.18-2.47) and 1.91 (1.59-2.30), respectively. DP moderated the association between sex and psychiatric healthcare, where women on DP displayed higher risk than men, X(2) 4.74 (p = 0.03).

    CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that losing one's role in work life aggravates rather than alleviates the burden of MS, as MS patients on DP seem to have a higher need for psychiatric healthcare, especially among women; which calls for extra awareness among clinicians.

  • 48.
    Blom, Eva Henje
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA, USA.
    Tymofiyeva, Olga
    Chesney, Margaret A.
    Ho, Tiffany C.
    Moran, Patricia
    Connolly, Colm G.
    Duncan, Larissa G.
    Baldini, Lisa
    Weng, Helen Y.
    Acree, Michael
    Goldman, Veronica
    Hecht, Frederick M.
    Yang, Tony T.
    Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of a Novel RDoC-Based Treatment Program for Adolescent Depression: "Training for Awareness Resilience and Action" (TARA)-A Pilot Study2017In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, ISSN 1664-0640, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 7, article id 208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The novel group treatment program Training for Awareness, Resilience, and Action (TARA) was developed to target specific mechanisms based on neuroscience findings in adolescent depression and framed within the National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria. TARA contains training of autonomic and emotional self-regulation, interoceptive awareness, relational skills, and value-based committed action.

    Methods: We performed a single-arm trial to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of TARA in reducing depression and anxiety levels and assessed whether the specific targeted domains of function reflected the hypothesized symptom change. Twenty-six adolescents (14–18 years old, 7 males and 19 females) participated in the 12-week group program. Assessment was performed before (T0), immediately after (T1), and 3 months after the end of TARA (T2).

    Results: Significant improvement was seen in depression symptoms (Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale Second Edition) between T0–T1 (t-value = −3.56, p = 0.002, CI = −6.64, −1.77) and T0–T2 (t-value = −4.17, p < 0.001, CI = −11.20, −3.75) and anxiety symptoms (Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children) between T0–T1 (t-value = −2.26, p = 0.033, CI = −4.61, −0.21) and T0–T2 (t-value = −3.06, p = 0.006, 95% confidence interval = −9.02, −1.73). Significant improvements in psychological flexibility, sleep, and mindfulness skills were also found between T0 and T2.

    Limitations: The sample size was small without a control condition. The pilot design did not allow for testing the hypothesized brain changes and effect of TARA on relevant systemic biomarkers.

    Conclusion: TARA is feasible in a sample of clinically depressed and/or anxious adolescents and preliminary efficacy was demonstrated by reduced depression and anxiety symptoms. The specific symptom and behavioral outcomes corresponded well with the hypothesized mechanisms of change.

  • 49.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Naesström, Matilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Bodlund, Owe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Deep brain stimulation in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial forebrain bundle in a patient with major depressive disorder and anorexia nervosa2017In: Clinical Case Reports, E-ISSN 2050-0904, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 679-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Key Clinical Message Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be considered in severe cases of therapy-refractory major depressive disorder (MDD). However, DBS for MDD is still an experimental therapy. Therefore, it should only be administered in clinical studies driven by multidisciplinary teams, including surgeons with substantial experience of DBS in the treatment of other conditions.

  • 50.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Sjöberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hansson, Maja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Bodlund, Owe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hariz, Marwan I
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Deep brain stimulation in the treatment of depression2011In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 4-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:  To present the technique of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and to evaluate the studies conducted on DBS in the treatment of therapy-refractory major depressive disorder (MDD).

    Method:  A review of the literature on DBS in the treatment of MDD was conducted.

    Results:  The results of DBS in MDD have been presented in 2 case reports and 3 studies of 47 patients operated upon in 5 different target areas. Positive effects have been presented in all studies and side effects have been minor. DBS in the nucleus accumbens resulted in a mean reduction of Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS) of 36% after 1 year and 30% of the 10 patients achieved remission. DBS in the internal capsule/ventral striatum resulted in a reduction of 44% after 1 year, and at the last evaluation after in mean 2 years, 40% of the 15 patients were in remission. The 20 patients with subcallosal cingulated gyrus DBS had a reduction of HDRS of 52% after 1 year, and 35% were within 1 point from remission or in remission.

    Conclusion:  DBS is a promising treatment for therapy-refractory MDD. The published experience is, however, limited, and the method is at present an experimental therapy.

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