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  • 1.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Jansson, Eva
    Westerståhl, Maria
    The Swedish physical activity and fitness cohort born in 1958 - dropout analysis and overview at 36-year follow-up2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, no 4, 418-429 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of the Swedish physical activity and fitness cohort study (SPAF-1958) was to describe physical fitness, physical activity, health, and lifestyle across part of the lifespan, and to assess the influences on these factors from the environment, personal factors, and genetics. There is inevitable dropout from longitudinal studies, and it may be systematic. The aim of this first paper of the second follow-up of SPAF-1958 was to provide a dropout analysis to consider to what extent the participants, at 52 years of age, remain a representative sample of the original adolescent study population. Additional aims were to provide an overview of the study protocol and the ongoing study population. Ongoing study participants in SPAF born in 1958 were, at the second follow-up at the age of 52, still representative of the study cohort in terms of sex, adolescent geographical area, upper secondary school program, adolescent body composition, muscular strength, and muscular endurance. However, a higher physical activity and, among women, a higher aerobic capacity in adolescence decreased the risk for dropout. It is important when interpreting results from longitudinal studies to adjust for the systematic dropout that could bias the conclusions drawn from the results.

  • 2.
    Abdelmoety, Ahmed
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    An investigation into the lived experiences of parents and health professionals involved in the treatment of children with cleft lip and/ or cleft palate in Egypt2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Aboka, Deliana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Prescribing practices of oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation stroke prophylaxis: An online survey among practitioners from Sweden and the United Kingdom2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4. AbouZahr, Carla
    et al.
    Boerma, Ties
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Publ Hlth, Johannesburg, South Africa ; Univ Aberdeen, Inst Appl Hlth Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Bridging the data gaps: do we have the right balance between country data and global estimates?2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, 1299978Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Adam-Poupart, Ariane
    et al.
    Labreche, France
    Smargiassi, Audrey
    Duguay, Patrice
    Busque, Marc-Antoine
    Gagne, Charles
    Rintamaki, Hannu
    Kjellström, Tord
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Zayed, Joseph
    Climate Change and Occupational Health and Safety in a Temperate Climate: Potential Impacts and Research Priorities in Quebec, Canada2013In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, Vol. 51, no 1, 68-78 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential impacts of climate change (CC) on Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) have been studied a little in tropical countries, while they received no attention in northern industrialized countries with a temperate climate. This work aimed to establish an overview of the potential links between CC and OHS in those countries and to determine research priorities for Quebec, Canada. A narrative review of the scientific literature (2005-2010) was presented to a working group of international and national experts and stakeholders during a workshop held in 2010. The working group was invited to identify knowledge gaps, and a modified Delphi method helped prioritize research avenues. This process highlighted five categories of hazards that are likely to impact OHS in northern industrialized countries: heat waves/increased temperatures, air pollutants, UV radiation, extreme weather events, vector-borne/zoonotic diseases. These hazards will affect working activities related to natural resources (i.e. agriculture, fishing and forestry) and may influence the socioeconomic context (built environment and green industries), thus indirectly modifying OHS. From this consensus approach, three categories of research were identified: 1) Knowledge acquisition on hazards, target populations and methods of adaptation; 2) Surveillance of diseases/accidents/occupational hazards; and 3) Development of new occupational adaptation strategies.

  • 6. Adams, D.
    et al.
    Coelho, T.
    Conceicao, I.
    Cruz, M. Waddington
    Schmidt, H.
    Buades, J.
    Campistol, J.
    Pouget, J.
    Berk, J. L.
    Ziyadeh, N.
    Partisano, A. M.
    Sweetser, M.
    Chen, J.
    Gollob, J.
    Suhr, Ole
    Umeå University.
    Phase 2 open-label extension (OLE) study of patisiran for the treatment of hereditary ATTR (hATTR) amyloidosis: 24-month safety and efficacy in subgroup of patients with cardiac involvement2017In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 19, no Suppl: 1, 19-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Adane, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Effectiveness of PMTCT programs in Sub-Saharan Africa, a meta-analysis2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Adcock, Joanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Overseas Development Institute, London, UK.
    Fottrell, Edward
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    The North-South information highway: case studies of publication access among health researchers in resource-poor countries2008In: Global health action, ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Less than 2% of scientific publications originate in low-income countries. Transfer of information from South to North and from South to South is grossly limited and hinders understanding of global health, while Northern-generated information fails to adequately address the needs of a Southern readership.

    Methods: A survey of a new generation of health researchers from nine low-income countries was conducted using a combination of email questionnaires and face-to-face interviews. Data were gathered on personal experiences, use and aspirations regarding access and contribution to published research.

    Results: A total of 23 individuals from 9 countries responded. Preference for journal use over textbooks was apparent, however a preference for print over online formats was described among African respondents compared to respondents from other areas. Almost all respondents (96%) described ambition to publish in international journals, but cited English language as a significant barrier.

    Conclusion: The desire to contribute to and utilise contemporary scientific debate appears to be strong among study respondents. However, longstanding barriers

  • 9. Aden, A S
    et al.
    Brännström, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Mohamud, K A
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    The growth chart - a road to health chart?: Maternal comprehension of the growth chart in two Somali villages1990In: Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, ISSN 0269-5022, E-ISSN 1365-3016, Vol. 4, no 3, 340-350 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth monitoring is so far not implemented on a large scale in the Somali health services. Available reports indicate that growth faltering is common. However, the use of growth charts as a tool for health education has been questioned. This study examines the ability of 199, predominantly illiterate, rural Somali mothers to understand the growth chart message after an intensive period of growth chart use and education. During a home-based interview the mothers were asked to combine a set of four growth curves with a set of four pictures, showing the corresponding developments of four children. The mothers managed significantly better to interpret the charts than could be expected by chance alone. Maternal age, number of children and literacy did not differ much between those who correctly and incorrectly combined pictures and charts. Almost all mothers recognised the value of the growth chart as being good for the control and promotion of their children's health and/or growth. We conclude that the growth chart may be an applicable and appropriate tool even with illiterate mothers, provided that other prerequisites for successful growth monitoring, e.g. appropriate health services, are available.

  • 10. Afshin, Ashkan
    et al.
    Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.
    Reitsma, Marissa B.
    Sur, Patrick
    Estep, Kara
    Lee, Alex
    Marczak, Laurie
    Mokdad, Ali H.
    Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar
    Naghavi, Mohsen
    Salama, Joseph S.
    Vos, Theo
    Abate, Kalkidan H.
    Abbafati, Cristiana
    Ahmed, Muktar B.
    Al-Aly, Ziyad
    Alkerwi, Ala'a
    Al-Raddadi, Rajaa
    Amare, Azmeraw T.
    Amberbir, Alemayehu
    Amegah, Adeladza K.
    Amini, Erfan
    Amrock, Stephen M.
    Anjana, Ranjit M.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Asayesh, Hamid
    Banerjee, Amitava
    Barac, Aleksandra
    Baye, Estifanos
    Bennett, Derrick A.
    Beyene, Addisu S.
    Biadgilign, Sibhatu
    Biryukov, Stan
    Bjertness, Espen
    Boneya, Dube J.
    Campos-Nonato, Ismael
    Carrero, Juan J.
    Cecilio, Pedro
    Cercy, Kelly
    Ciobanu, Liliana G.
    Cornaby, Leslie
    Damtew, Solomon A.
    Dandona, Lalit
    Dandona, Rakhi
    Dharmaratne, Samath D.
    Duncan, Bruce B.
    Eshrati, Babak
    Esteghamati, Alireza
    Feigin, Valery L.
    Fernandes, Joao C.
    Furst, Thomas
    Gebrehiwot, Tsegaye T.
    Gold, Audra
    Gona, Philimon N.
    Goto, Atsushi
    Habtewold, Tesfa D.
    Hadush, Kokeb T.
    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima
    Hay, Simon I.
    Horino, Masako
    Islami, Farhad
    Kamal, Ritul
    Kasaeian, Amir
    Katikireddi, Srinivasa V.
    Kengne, Andre P.
    Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan N.
    Khader, Yousef S.
    Khang, Young-Ho
    Khubchandani, Jagdish
    Kim, Daniel
    Kim, Yun J.
    Kinfu, Yohannes
    Kosen, Soewarta
    Ku, Tiffany
    Defo, Barthelemy Kuate
    Kumar, G. Anil
    Larson, Heidi J.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Liang, Xiaofeng
    Lim, Stephen S.
    Liu, Patrick
    Lopez, Alan D.
    Lozano, Rafael
    Majeed, Azeem
    Malekzadeh, Reza
    Malta, Deborah C.
    Mazidi, Mohsen
    McAlinden, Colm
    McGarvey, Stephen T.
    Mengistu, Desalegn T.
    Mensah, George A.
    Mensink, Gert B. M.
    Mezgebe, Haftay B.
    Mirrakhimov, Erkin M.
    Mueller, Ulrich O.
    Noubiap, Jean J.
    Obermeyer, Carla M.
    Ogbo, Felix A.
    Owolabi, Mayowa O.
    Patton, George C.
    Pourmalek, Farshad
    Qorbani, Mostafa
    Rafay, Anwar
    Rai, Rajesh K.
    Ranabhat, Chhabi L.
    Reinig, Nikolas
    Safiri, Saeid
    Salomon, Joshua A.
    Sanabria, Juan R.
    Santos, Itamar S.
    Sartorius, Benn
    Sawhney, Monika
    Schmidhuber, Josef
    Schutte, Aletta E.
    Schmidt, Maria I.
    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.
    Shamsizadeh, Moretza
    Sheikhbahaei, Sara
    Shin, Min-Jeong
    Shiri, Rahman
    Shiue, Ivy
    Roba, Hirbo S.
    Silva, Diego A. S.
    Silverberg, Jonathan I.
    Singh, Jasvinder A.
    Stranges, Saverio
    Swaminathan, Soumya
    Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael
    Tadese, Fentaw
    Tedla, Bemnet A.
    Tegegne, Balewgizie S.
    Terkawi, Abdullah S.
    Thakur, J. S.
    Tonelli, Marcello
    Topor-Madry, Roman
    Tyrovolas, Stefanos
    Ukwaja, Kingsley N.
    Uthman, Olalekan A.
    Vaezghasemi, Masoud
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Vasankari, Tommi
    Vlassov, Vasiliy V.
    Vollset, Stein E.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Werdecker, Andrea
    Wesana, Joshua
    Westerman, Ronny
    Yano, Yuichiro
    Yonemoto, Naohiro
    Yonga, Gerald
    Zaidi, Zoubida
    Zenebe, Zerihun M.
    Zipkin, Ben
    Murray, Christopher J. L.
    Health Effects of Overweight and Obesity in 195 Countries over 25 Years2017In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 377, no 1, 13-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Although the rising pandemic of obesity has received major attention in many countries, the effects of this attention on trends and the disease burden of obesity remain uncertain. METHODS We analyzed data from 68.5 million persons to assess the trends in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children and adults between 1980 and 2015. Using the Global Burden of Disease study data and methods, we also quantified the burden of disease related to high body-mass index (BMI), according to age, sex, cause, and BMI in 195 countries between 1990 and 2015. RESULTS In 2015, a total of 107.7 million children and 603.7 million adults were obese. Since 1980, the prevalence of obesity has doubled in more than 70 countries and has continuously increased in most other countries. Although the prevalence of obesity among children has been lower than that among adults, the rate of increase in childhood obesity in many countries has been greater than the rate of increase in adult obesity. High BMI accounted for 4.0 million deaths globally, nearly 40% of which occurred in persons who were not obese. More than two thirds of deaths related to high BMI were due to cardiovascular disease. The disease burden related to high BMI has increased since 1990; however, the rate of this increase has been attenuated owing to decreases in underlying rates of death from cardiovascular disease. CONCLUSIONS The rapid increase in the prevalence and disease burden of elevated BMI highlights the need for continued focus on surveillance of BMI and identification, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based interventions to address this problem. 

  • 11.
    Ahangari, Alebtekin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Chronic pelvic pain: 8 years after the 2006 WHO systematic review2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 12.
    Ahangari, Alebtekin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Pain and Alcohol Consumption among Elderly: Evidences from WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (Wave 1)2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 13.
    Ahangari, Alebtekin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Prevalence of Chronic Pelvic Pain Among Women: An Updated Review2014In: Pain Physician, ISSN 1533-3159, Vol. 17, no 2, E141-E147 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic pelvic pain (CPP), defined as a noncyclical pain lasting for more than 6 months can lead to lower physical performance and quality of life in women. CPP is a worldwide problem affecting women of all ages. However, health care professionals and researchers, due to its complex nature and the lack of knowledge surrounding the condition, frequently neglect CPP. Subsequently, basic data and knowledge regarding CPP remain incomplete. Objective: To update the review of the worldwide estimation of the CPP prevalence considering the World Health Organization systematic review by Latthe et al in 2006 as point of departure. Study Design: A systematic review of CPP prevalence studies. Method: Electronic search was performed to find related articles through PubMed between 2005 and 2012 based on the PRISMA statement (2009). Results: From 140 studies, only 7 studies were about CPP prevalence. Their study design consisted of 3 cross sectional studies, one population based mailing questionnaire study, one survey study (computer assisted telephone interview), one data analysis by questionnaire, and one prospective community based study. Limitations: Paucity of population based studies in addition to probability of existence of studies at the local level with limited access to worldwide databases, lack of consensus about definition of CPP among researchers and therapists, and non-inclusion of CPP related key words in databases such as PubMed. Conclusion: Based on these articles, prevalence in general ranged between 5.7% and 26.6%. There were many countries and regions without basic data in the field of CPP. This review shows the paucity of studies, especially multidisciplinary researches with multifactorial views on CPP. Multidisciplinary studies would provide more reliable data for estimating the prevalence of CPP and its psycho-socioeconomic burden, as well as finding its etiologies and characteristics. This would be the first step towards better treatment and care for women with CPP.

  • 14.
    Ahangari, Alebtekin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stewart Williams, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Research Centre for Generational, Health and Ageing, School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Pain and alcohol consumption among older adults: findings from the World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health, Wave 12016In: Tropical medicine & international health, ISSN 1360-2276, E-ISSN 1365-3156, Vol. 21, no 10, 1282-1292 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate cross-sectional associations between self-reported recent pain and alcohol use/abstinence, and previous-day pain and previous-week alcohol consumption in adults aged 50 + in six low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). METHODS: The WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 (2007-2010) in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa is the data source. Prevalence of alcohol use/abstinence is reported by previous-day and previous-month pain. Multinomial logistic regressions (crude and adjusted for sex and country) tested associations between recent pain and alcohol use in the pooled multicountry sample. RESULTS: Across the six SAGE countries, about one-third of respondents reported alcohol use, being highest in Russia (74%) and lowest in India (16%). Holding the effects of sex and country constant, compared with abstainers, people with previous-day pain were more likely to be previous-day or other users. With regard to the quantity and frequency of alcohol use, people with previous-day pain were more likely to be non-heavy drinkers. CONCLUSION: Overall, we found that, in this population of older adults in six LMICs, recent pain was associated with moderate use of alcohol, although there were differences between countries. The findings provide a platform for country-specific research to better understand bi-directional associations between pain and alcohol in older adults.

  • 15.
    Ahlm, Clas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Vapalahti, O.
    University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital Laboratory, Finland.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Seroprevalence of Sindbis virus and associated risk factors in northern Sweden2014In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, no 7, 1559-1565 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mosquito-borne Sindbis virus (SINV) cause disease characterized by rash, fever and arthritis which often leads to long-lasting arthralgia. To determine the seroprevalence of SINV and associated risk factors in northern Sweden, a randomly selected population aged between 25 and 74 years were invited to join the MONICA study. Serum from 1611 samples were analysed for specific IgG antibodies. Overall, 2·9% had IgG against SINV. More men (3·7%) than women (2·0%) were SINV seropositive (P = 0·047) and it was more common in subjects with a lower educational level (P = 0·013) and living in small, rural communities (P < 0·001). Seropositivity was associated with higher waist circumference (P = 0·1), elevated diastolic blood pressure (P = 0·037), and history of a previous stroke (P = 0·011). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for known risk factors for stroke, seropositivity for SINV was an independent predictor of having had a stroke (odds ratio 4·3, 95% confidence interval 1·4–13·0,P = 0·011).

  • 16.
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    et al.
    Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Zhao, Wei
    Philadelphia, PA, US.
    Renström, Frida
    Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rasheed, Asif
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Samuel, Maria
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Zaidi, Mozzam
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Shah, Nabi
    Karachi, Pakistan; Abbottabad, Pakistan.
    Mallick, Nadeem Hayyat
    Punjab Institute of Cardiology, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Zaman, Khan Shah
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Ishaq, Mohammad
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Rasheed, Syed Zahed
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Memon, Fazal-ur-Rheman
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Hanif, Bashir
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Lakhani, Muhammad Shakir
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Ahmed, Faisal
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Kazmi, Shahana Urooj
    Karachi, Pakistan.
    Frossard, Philippe
    Karachi, Pakistan; Nazarbayev University, Astana, Kazakhstan.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
    Saleheen, Danish
    Philadelphia, PA, US; Karachi, Pakistan.
    Physical activity, smoking, and genetic predisposition to obesity in people from Pakistan: the PROMIS study2015In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 16, 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Multiple genetic variants have been reliably associated with obesity-related traits in Europeans, but little is known about their associations and interactions with lifestyle factors in South Asians.

    Methods: In 16,157 Pakistani adults (8232 controls; 7925 diagnosed with myocardial infarction [MI]) enrolled in the PROMIS Study, we tested whether: a) BMI-associated loci, individually or in aggregate (as a genetic risk score - GRS), are associated with BMI; b) physical activity and smoking modify the association of these loci with BMI. Analyses were adjusted for age, age(2), sex, MI (yes/no), and population substructure.

    Results: Of 95 SNPs studied here, 73 showed directionally consistent effects on BMI as reported in Europeans. Each additional BMI-raising allele of the GRS was associated with 0.04 (SE = 0.01) kg/m(2) higher BMI (P = 4.5 x 10(-14)). We observed nominal evidence of interactions of CLIP1 rs11583200 (P-interaction = 0.014), CADM2 rs13078960 (P-interaction = 0.037) and GALNT10 rs7715256 (P-interaction = 0.048) with physical activity, and PTBP2 rs11165643 (P-interaction = 0.045), HIP1 rs1167827 (P-interaction = 0.015), C6orf106 rs205262 (P-interaction = 0.032) and GRID1 rs7899106 (P-interaction = 0.043) with smoking on BMI.

    Conclusions: Most BMI-associated loci have directionally consistent effects on BMI in Pakistanis and Europeans. There were suggestive interactions of established BMI-related SNPs with smoking or physical activity.

  • 17.
    Ahmed Hassan Ahmed, Osama
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Rift Valley fever: challenges and new insights for prevention and control using the “One Health” approach2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging viral zoonosis that causes frequent outbreaks in east Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. The likelihood of RVF global expansion due to climate change and human anthropogenic factors is an important issue. The causative agent, RVF virus, is an arbovirus that is transmitted by several mosquito species and is able to infect a wide range of livestock as well as people. The infection leads to mass abortions and death in livestock and a potentially deadly hemorrhagic fever in humans. RVF has severe socio-economic consequences such as animal trade bans between countries, disruption of food security, and economic disaster for farmers and pastoralists as well as for countries. Human behavior such as direct contact with infected animals or their fluids and exposure to mosquito bites increases the risk for contracting the disease.

    To better understand the challenges associated with RVF outbreaks and to explore prevention and control strategies, we used the One Health approach. The local community had to be involved to understand the interaction between the environment, animals, and humans. We focused on Sudan, Saudi Arabia, and Kenya. First, we systematically reviewed the literature and then we performed cross sectional community-based studies using a special One Health questionnaire. Climatic and remote sensing data were used in combination with statistics to develop a sub-region predictive model for RVF.

    For both Saudi Arabia and Sudan, the ecology and environment of the affected areas were similar. These areas included irrigation canals and excessive rains that provide an attractive habitat for mosquito vectors to multiply. The surveillance systems were unable to detect the virus in livestock before it spread to humans. Ideally, livestock should serve as sentinels to prevent loss of human lives, but the situation here was reversed. Differences between countries regarding further spread of RVF was mainly determined by better economic and infrastructure resources.

    In Sudan, there was a lack of knowledge and appropriate practices at the studied community regarding RVF disease symptoms and risk factors for both animals and humans. The community was hesitant in notifying the authorities about RVF suspicion in livestock due to the lack of a compensation system. The perceived role of the community in controlling RVF was fragmented, increasing the probability of RVF transmission and disease.

    In Kenya, our study found that better knowledge about RVF does not always translate to more appropriate practices that avoid exposure to the disease. However, the combination of good knowledge, attitudes, and practices may explain why certain communities were less affected. Strategies to combat RVF should consider socio-cultural and behavioral differences among communities. We also noticed that RVF outbreaks in Kenya occurred in regions with high livestock density exposed to heavy rains and wet soil fluxes, which could be measured by evapotranspiration and vegetation seasonality variables. We developed a RVF risk map on a sub-regional scale. Future outbreaks could be better managed if such relevant RVF variables are integrated into early warning systems.

    To confront RVF outbreaks, a policy is needed that better incorporates ecological factors and human interactions with livestock and environment that help the RVF pathogen spread. Early detection and notification of RVF is essential because a delay will threaten the core of International Health Regulations (IHR), which emphasizes the share of information during a transboundary disease outbreak to avoid unnecessary geographical expansion.

  • 18. Ahmed, Syed Masud
    et al.
    Hadi, Abdullahel
    Razzaque, Abdur
    Ashraf, Ali
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Indonesia.
    Kanungsukkasem, Uraiwan
    Soonthornthada, Kusol
    Van Minh, Hoang
    Huu Bich, Tran
    Clustering of chronic non-communicable disease risk factors among selected Asian populations: levels and determinants2009In: Global health action, ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 2, no 1, 68-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The major chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) operate through a cluster of common risk factors, whose presence or absence determines not only the occurrence and severity of the disease, but also informs treatment approaches. Primary prevention based on mitigation of these common risk factors through population-based programmes is the most cost-effective approach to contain the emerging epidemic of chronic NCDs.

    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to explore the extent of risk factors clustering for the major chronic NCDs and its determinants in nine

    INDEPTH Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) sites of five Asian countries. DESIGN: Data originated from a multi-site chronic NCD risk factor prevalence survey conducted in 2005. This cross-sectional survey used a standardised questionnaire developed by the WHO to collect core data on common risk factors such as tobacco use, intake of fruits and vegetables, physical inactivity, blood pressure levels, and body mass index. Respondents included randomly selected sample of adults (25-64 years) living in nine rural HDSS sites in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam.

    RESULTS: Findings revealed a substantial proportion (>70%) of these largely rural populations having three or more risk factors for chronic NCDs. Chronic NCD risk factors clustering was associated with increasing age, being male, and higher educational achievements. Differences were noted among the different sites, both between and within country.

    CONCLUSIONS: Since there is an extensive clustering of risk factors for the chronic NCDs in the populations studied, the interventions also need to be based on a comprehensive approach rather than on a single factor to forestall its cumulative effects which occur over time. This can work best if it is integrated within the primary health care system and the HDSS can be an invaluable epidemiological resource in this endeavor.

  • 19.
    Akuamoah-Boateng, Henrietta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Self-reported vision health status among older people in the Kassena-Nankana District, Ghana2013In: Global health action, ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 6, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: If current trends continue, Ghana's aged population will increase in the coming decades. Currently, there is little knowledge on the health of the aged in Ghana. Research on vision problems among this group is virtually non-existent. This research gap needs to be filled immediately in order to promote the general health among older people in Ghana.

    Objective: The objective of the study was to analyse vision health and its determinants among the older adult population in a district in one of the poorest regions in Ghana - the Kassena-Nankana district.

    Methods: Data were obtained from the WHO multi-country studies unit (SAGE). A total of 4,294 people over the age of 50 responded to the survey. Data analysis was conducted using Stata statistical package. The aim of the analysis was to identify the prevalence of self-reported vision problems and assistive device use. Age, level of education, marital status, living arrangement, socio-economic status and proportion of people aged 50 and over in a household were used as determinants of vision health.

    Results: In total, 54 and 63% (p-value, 0.00) of men and women reported having far-sightedness, while 35% of men and 40.6% of women reported having near-sightedness (p-value, 0.00). In total, 33.5% of men and 38.6% of women reported having both near-sightedness and far-sightedness (p-value, 0.00). Of those who reported having either vision problems, 2.9% reported the use of visual assistive devices. Men had a higher assistive device use of 4.5% compared to 2.1% among women (p = 0.002). Age and household socio-economic status was positively associated with reporting vision problems and assistive device use, respectively.

    Conclusions: The results from this analysis showed that despite the high reporting of vision problems, only 2.9% reported using assistive devices. This outcome shows that there is a need to prevent vision problems and increase access to assistive devices among older people in the Kassena-Nankana district in Ghana.

  • 20.
    Al Bitar, Ghiath
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Diabetes and Edentulism: Analysis of WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 12015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 21.
    Al Mamun, Mohammad Feroz
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Pokharel, Arpan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Reasons behind the use of tanning beds:: A Scoping Review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Tanning beds emit short, energetic and harmful rays, UV-A and UV-B which leads to various ocular and skin diseases; moreover, DNA damage and the initiation of carcinogenic changes are associated with regular use of it. Basal cell carcinoma and melanoma incidence rate have been rapidly increasing over a few decades due to unregulated consumption of solar bed. It has been classified as carcinogenic device and different organizations regularly advice for the prohibition of it. Despite the proven association of ocular and skin diseases and cancer from the large epidemiological data solar bed consumption is not degraded; furthermore, tanning bed has been developed as a culture in the modern western world. The exploration of tanning bed displayed that it is interconnected with the ancient sun worshippers, an advent of vitamin D and carbon arc lamps with quartz lens, heliotherapy clinics and to the modern sun stimulated indoor tanning. This scoping review provides a broad understanding of the reasons behind the popularity and the current consumption of indoor tanning bed.

    Aim:

    The aim of our study is to analyse and summarize the factors that contribute to the practice of indoor tanning beds in an overall population; furthermore, attitudes, perception, belief, behaviour and motivation factors of indoor tanners were undertaken to explore and find gaps in the existing literatures.

     Method:

    By using a scoping review twenty articles both qualitative and quantitative were identified and selected from the Umeå University Library website by using only one database, “Web of Science TM Core Collection Studies (v.5.21)” during the months of March and April 2016.  Boolean logic was used to identify both qualitative and quantitative studies with keywords such as “Indoor tanning”, “Tanning bed”, “Qualitative Study”, “attitude”, “belief”, “behaviour”, “motivation” and “perception”. The relevant articles that were published and written only in English language and free to download a full copy of the articles through the Umeå University Library website and without any financial transactions and contacts with organizations and authors were included. In terms of population, our target study group is broad which includes both male and female population who are active and passive users of the tanning beds. The age of the participants in our study range from 11 years to 94 years.

    Results:

    Seven themes are reported to be the main reasons behind the consumption of carcinogenic tanning bed. These are: - (1) Modern Healthism, (2) Influence from family and friends, (3) Social occasions and holidays, (4) Physical and Mental Gain, (5) Complex cognition, (6) Addiction and (7) Tactful marketing.  Modern healthism, tanning industries and salon’s tactful marketing help to set up image-based modern norms, attractive, healthy golden brown skin, in societal level influencing families and friends, which further develops indoor tanning as a culture and beautifying practice during special events like social occasions and holidays. The cognition regarding physical and mental gain perceived from an individual and societal perspective and contradictory findings from ongoing researches with respect to the hazards of solar beds create complex cognition among active and passive tanners, like ambivalence, cognitive dissonance, temporal discounting, rationalization and optimistic bias. However, in the adolescent phase, there is increasing consumption of the tanning beds which can be further explained by complex cognitive, the adolescent egocentrism. The complex cognition enhances the regular use of addictive tanning bed which further leads to dependence and skin cancers or the diseases of the eyes and the skin.

    Conclusions: Consumption of risky tanning bed has been developed as a culture or beauty norms that are still ingrained in the mind of tanners, i.e., golden brown tanned skin is attractive, which is created under the influence of modern healthism. The reasons behind the use of carcinogenic solar bed can be well explained by the concepts of cognitive science and psychology, i.e., ambivalence, adolescent egocentrism, cognitive dissonance, temporal discounting, rationalization, optimistic bias, and addiction. In order to tackle with solar bed dependence and its health related hazards, health workers should develop and implement promotive and preventive health programs which incorporate social norms and factors, tanner’s cognition and psychology. Policy makers and health actors should ban solar beds or avoid the use of it in the minors, i.e., under 18 years through embracing the evidence suggested by epidemiological studies.

  • 22.
    Alabi, Olusola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Exploring awareness and knowledge of tuberculosis spread among household members of tuberculosis patients in Nigeria2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 23. Alberts, Marianne
    et al.
    Dikotope, Sekgothe A
    Choma, Solomon R
    Masemola, Matshane L
    Modjadji, Sewela EP
    Mashinya, Felistas
    Burger, Sandra
    Cook, Ian
    Brits, Sanette J
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesberg, South Africa.
    Health & Demographic Surveillance System Profile: The Dikgale Health and Demographic Surveillance System.2015In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 44, no 5, 1565-1571 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Aldrich, Rosemary
    et al.
    Mahoney, Mary
    Harris, Elizabeth
    Simpson, Sarah
    Stewart-Williams, Jenny
    Newcastle Institute of Public health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.
    Building an equity focus in health impact assessment2005In: New South Wales Public Health Bulletin, ISSN 1034-7674, Vol. 16, no 7-8, 118-119 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Pischon, Tobias
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Norat, Teresa
    Romaguera, Dora
    Knüppel, Sven
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Dartois, Laureen
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Li, Kuanrong
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Quirós, José Ramón
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Sánchez, María José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Bradbury, Kathryn E
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tumino, Rosario
    Naccarati, Alessio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Siersema, Peter D
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Borch, Kristin
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Kong, Joyce
    Gunter, Marc J
    Ward, Heather A
    Riboli, Elio
    Boeing, Heiner
    Combined impact of healthy lifestyle factors on colorectal cancer: a large European cohort study2014In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 12, no 1, 168- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Excess body weight, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and certain dietary factors are individually related to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk; however, little is known about their joint effects. The aim of this study was to develop a healthy lifestyle index (HLI) composed of five potentially modifiable lifestyle factors - healthy weight, physical activity, non-smoking, limited alcohol consumption and a healthy diet, and to explore the association of this index with CRC incidence using data collected within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: In the EPIC cohort, a total of 347,237 men and women, 25- to 70-years old, provided dietary and lifestyle information at study baseline (1992 to 2000). Over a median follow-up time of 12 years, 3,759 incident CRC cases were identified. The association between a HLI and CRC risk was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression models and population attributable risks (PARs) have been calculated. RESULTS: After accounting for study centre, age, sex and education, compared with 0 or 1 healthy lifestyle factors, the hazard ratio (HR) for CRC was 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44 to 0.77) for two factors, 0.79 (95% CI: 0.70 to 0.89) for three factors, 0.66 (95% CI: 0.58 to 0.75) for four factors and 0.63 (95% CI: 0.54 to 0.74) for five factors; P-trend <0.0001. The associations were present for both colon and rectal cancers, HRs, 0.61 (95% CI: 0.50 to 0.74; P for trend <0.0001) for colon cancer and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53 to 0.88; P-trend <0.0001) for rectal cancer, respectively (P-difference by cancer sub-site = 0.10). Overall, 16% of the new CRC cases (22% in men and 11% in women) were attributable to not adhering to a combination of all five healthy lifestyle behaviours included in the index. CONCLUSIONS: Combined lifestyle factors are associated with a lower incidence of CRC in European populations characterized by western lifestyles. Prevention strategies considering complex targeting of multiple lifestyle factors may provide practical means for improved CRC prevention.

  • 26. Aleman, J
    et al.
    Brännström, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Liljestrand, J
    Peña, R
    Persson, L A
    Steidinger, J
    Saving more neonates in hospital: an intervention towards a sustainable reduction in neonatal mortality in a Nicaraguan hospital1998In: Tropical doctor, ISSN 0049-4755, Vol. 28, no 2, 88-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A process of change was initiated in a Nicaraguan regional hospital in order to achieve a sustainable reduction of early neonatal mortality. A series of organizational, educational and hygienic measures was introduced, involving all staff in antenatal care, delivery care and neonatal care. Neonatal mortality decreased from 56/1000 live births in 1985 to 11/1000 in 1993. A commission of maternal and child health, a weekly perinatal audit, the active involvement of all staff and dedicated work of key individuals, as well as national policy decisions, are considered important determinants of the process. Keeping neonatal mortality in focus through continuous analysis of care routines, and through external exchange of ideas is important in order to sustain improvements and to decrease further the mortality.

  • 27.
    Alemu, Andinet Worku
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Determinants of survival in adult HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Oromiyaa, Ethiopia2010In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 3, 5398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The antiretroviral treatment (ART) scale-up service has been a recent development in Ethiopia, but its impact on mortality has not been well investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the early survival outcome of the scale-up service by utilizing routine hospital data.

    Methods: All adult HIV/AIDS patients who started on antiretroviral treatment in Shashemene and Assela hospitals from January 1, 2006 to May 31, 2006 were included and followed up for 2 years. Data were extracted from standard patient medical registrations. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate survival probability and the Cox proportional hazard model was applied to determine predictors of mortality. Two alterative assumptions (real case and worst case) were made in determining predictors of mortality.

    Results: The median age of patients was 33 years and 57% were female. Eighty-five percent had CD4 <200 cells/mu L with a median CD4 count of 103 cells/mu L. The median survival time was 104.4 weeks. A total of 28 (10.3%) deaths were observed during the 2-year period and 48 patients (18%) were lost to follow up. The majority of deaths occurred in the first 4 months of treatment. In multivariate analysis, 2-year survival was significantly associated with the clinical stage of the disease, baseline hemoglobin, and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis therapy (CPT) at or before ART initiation in both assumptions. The median CD4 count and body weight showed a marked improvement during the first 6 months of treatment, followed by stagnation thereafter.

    Conclusion: The study has shown an overall low mortality but a high loss to follow-up rate of the cohort. Advanced clinical stage, anemia, low body weight, and lack of CPT initiation were independent predictors of mortality - but not gender. CPT initiation should be encouraged in routine HIV care services, and patient retention mechanisms have to be strengthened. Stagnation in immunological and weight recovery after the first 6 months should be further investigated. The utilization of routine data should be encouraged in order to facilitate appropriate decision making.

  • 28. Alemu, Yihun Mulugeta
    et al.
    Awoke, Worku
    Wilder-Smith, Annalies
    Institute of Public Health, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany; Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.
    Determinants for tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia: a multicentre case-control study2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 4, e009058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to identify determinants for tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia.

    DESIGN: Case-control study.

    SETTING: Three hospitals and 10 health centres in Northwest Ethiopia.

    PARTICIPANTS: A total of 446 individuals consented to participate in the study (150 cases and 296 controls). Cases were HIV-infected adults diagnosed with active TB, and controls were HIV-infected adults without active TB.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The link between TB and determinants was assessed using logistic regression. Determinants were categorised as sociodemographic, host-related, clinical and environmental.

    RESULTS: Smoking (adjusted OR (AOR) 5.47; 95% CI 2.26 to 13.22), presence of a TB patient in the family (AOR 2.66; 95% CI 1.25 to 5.66), alcohol consumption (AOR 2.49; 95% CI 1.29 to 4.80) and chewing khat (AOR 2.22; 95% CI 1.11 to 4.41) were independent determinants for increased occurrence of TB. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (AOR 0.25; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.51), isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.41) and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy (AOR 0.32; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.55) had a protective effect against TB.

    CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected adults with substance abuse (tobacco smoking, khat chewing and alcohol) should be prioritised for TB screening. This study reaffirmed that HAART and IPT are some of the best strategies for reducing TB occurrence in HIV-infected adults. These findings provide impetus to intensify tracing of TB household contacts.

  • 29.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    A Clinical and Genetic Study of Psoriatic Arthritis2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis. PsA has a heterogeneous pattern, expressed by different manifestations such as mild mono-oligoarthritis or very severe, erosive and destructive polyarthritis. Measurable inflammatory activity is not always prominent. The aetiology is unknown but genetic factors are believed to be of importance. The pattern of inheritance is proposed to be polygenic. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of joint and axial manifestations, characterise the disease in relation to inflammatory and genetic markers, and to identify disease susceptibility gene(s) for PsA in patients from northern Sweden.

    All patients from the city of Umeå (n=276), selected from a community and hospital based psoriasis register (n=1737) at the Dept of Dermatology, were invited to a prevalence study. Two hundred-two patients were examined and 97 (48%) had inflammatory manifestations such as peripheral arthritis, axial disease, undifferentiated spondylarthropathy (uSpA) and enthesopathies. Of the 67 patients (33 %) with peripheral arthritis and/or axial disease, 30 were not previously diagnosed.

    The association of clinical manifestations and potential markers of aggressive joint disease with HLA associations were analysed in 88 patients with PsA. We were not able to confirm findings of other groups reporting strong association with several HLA-antigens. The prevalence of HLA-B17, B37 and B62 was increased compared with controls, but the strongest predictive factors among our patients for an aggressive disease, in a multiple logistic analysis, were polyarthritic disease and distal interphalangeal engagement.

    In order to investigate for disease susceptibility genes, five genetic loci were analysed with microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms in an association study of 120 patients with PsA. There was a significant association with the TNFB locus on chromosome 6p but not with any other loci examined; 1q21 (PSORS4), 3q21 (PSORS5), 8q24 and CTLA4. When stratifying for the TNFB alleles the association was confined to allele 123. In a subgroup of patients who were HLA-typed (n=83), we were not able to verify linkage disequilibrium with the TNFB allele 123 and the HLA antigens; B17, B27, B37, B62 or Cw*0602.

    The presence of renal abnormalities was evaluated as a manifestation of systemic inflammation in 73 patients with PsA. Renal abnormalities defined as decreased creatinine-clearance (≤ mean - 2SD) and/or urinary albumin >25 mg/24 h was found in 23% of the patients. The predictive factors for renal abnormalities was inflammatory activity (ESR > 25 mm/h and/or CRP >15 mg/L) indicating a systemic effect in some of the patients.

    In conclusion, we found high prevalence of inflammatory manifestations in patients with psoriasis. There was no strong association between PsA and HLA antigens and predictive factors for aggressive disease were polyarthritic disease and DIP joint engagement. The TNFB locus was associated with PsA and there were no linkage disequilibrium with the HLA antigens B17, B27, B62 or Cw*0602. There were evidence for systemic effects as renal abnormalities in patients with PsA and measurable inflammatory activity.

  • 30.
    Alers, Margret
    et al.
    Unit Gender and Women’s Health, Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands .
    Pepping, Tess
    Unit Gender and Women’s Health, Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Bor, Hans
    Unit Gender and Women’s Health, Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Verdonk, Petra
    Department of Medical Humanities, School of Medical Sciences, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands .
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lagro-Janssen, Antoine
    Unit Gender and Women’s Health, Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Speciality preferences in Dutch medical students influenced by their anticipation on family responsibilities2014In: Perspectives on Medical Eduction, ISSN 2212-277X, Vol. 3, no 6, 443-454 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physician gender is associated with differences in the male-to-female ratio between specialities and with preferred working hours. We explored how graduating students’ sex or full-time or part-time preference influences their speciality choice, taking work-life issues into account. Graduating medical students at Radboud University Medical Centre, the Netherlands participated in a survey (2008–2012) on career considerations. Logistic regression tested the influence of sex or working hour preference on speciality choice and whether work-life issues mediate. Of the responding students (N = 1,050, response rate 83, 73.3 % women), men preferred full-time work, whereas women equally opted for part time. More men chose surgery, more women family medicine. A full-time preference was associated with a preference for surgery, internal medicine and neurology, a part-time preference with psychiatry and family medicine. Both male and female students anticipated that foremost the career of women will be negatively influenced by family life. A full-time preference was associated with an expectation of equality in career opportunities or with a less ambitious partner whose career would affect family life. This increased the likelihood of a choice for surgery and reduced the preference for family medicine among female students. Gender specifically plays an important role in female graduates’ speciality choice making, through considerations on career prospects and family responsibilities.

  • 31.
    Alfredsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Jeghannathan, Bhoomikumar
    Attitudes towards mental health and the integration of mental health services into primary health care: a cross-sectional survey among health-care workers in Lvea Em District, Cambodia2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, 1331579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cambodia is a country where the resources for treating mental health disorders are far from sufficient. One strategy to narrow the treatment gap is to integrate mental health into primary health care (PHC). Understanding the knowledge and attitudes towards mental health integration that health-care workers have is important for assessing the challenges and opportunities when planning a potential integration project. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess these basic conditions in Lvea Em District, Cambodia. Design: A structured self-reporting questionnaire regarding attitudes and knowledge about mental health and its integration into PHC was collected from 75 health-care workers in Lvea Em District, Cambodia in October 2015. Firstly, descriptive analyses were carried out, and secondly, linear regression analyses to assess the relationship between attitudes and socio-demographic variables were conducted. Results: There was clear support towards integrating mental health services into PHC among these participants as 81.3% were interested in personally delivering mental health care at their units. Respondents who reported having received some kind of mental health-care training tended to have a more positive attitude towards mentally ill people (p = 0.005) and those who thought there was a high need for mental health care had a more favourable attitude towards the integration of mental health services (p = 0.007). Conclusions: The most important finding from this survey was the willingness and the acceptance of the need for integration of mental health care. This enhances the feasibility of integrating mental health services at the PHC level. Improving the competence of mental health care in these settings will likely help to reduce the treatment gap for mental, neurological and substance use disorders in Cambodia.

  • 32. Ali, Mohammed
    et al.
    Asefaw, Teklehaimanot
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Beyene, Hagos
    Pedersen, F Karup
    Helping northern Ethiopian communities reduce childhood mortality: population-based intervention trial2005In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization, ISSN 0042-9686, E-ISSN 1564-0604, Vol. 83, no 1, 27-33 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Ali, Tazeen S
    et al.
    Asad, Nargis
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Intimate partner violence in urban Pakistan: prevalence, frequency, and risk factors2011In: International journal of women's health, ISSN 1179-1411, Vol. 3, 105-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an important public health issue with severe adverse consequences. Population-based data on IPV from Muslim societies are scarce, and Pakistan is no exception. This study was conducted among women residing in urban Karachi, to estimate the prevalence and frequency of different forms of IPV and their associations with sociodemographic factors.

    Methods: This cross-sectional community-based study was conducted using a structured questionnaire developed by the World Health Organisation for research on violence. Community midwives conducted face-to-face interviews with 759 married women aged 25–60 years.

    Results: Self-reported past-year and lifetime prevalence of physical violence was 56.3 and 57.6%, respectively; the corresponding figures for sexual violence were 53.4% and 54.5%, and for psychological abuse were 81.8% and 83.6%. Violent incidents were mostly reported to have occurred on more than three occasions during the lifetime. Risk factors for physical violence related mainly to the husband, his low educational attainment, unskilled worker status, and five or more family members living in one household. For sexual violence, the risk factors were the respondent’s low educational attainment, low socioeconomic status of the family, and five or more family members in one household. For psychological violence, the risk factors were the husband being an unskilled worker and low socioeconomic status of the family.

    Conclusion: Repeated violence perpetrated by a husband towards his wife is an extremely common phenomenon in Karachi, Pakistan. Indifference to this type of violence against women stems from the attitude that IPV is a private matter, usually considered a justifiable response to misbehavior on the part of the wife. These findings point to serious violations of women’s rights and require the immediate attention of health professionals and policymakers.

  • 34. Ali, Tazeen S
    et al.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Gul, Raisa
    Asad, Nargis
    Johansson, Eva
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Gender roles and their influence on life prospects for women in urban Karachi, Pakistan: a qualitative study2011In: Global health action, ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 4, 7448- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pakistan is a patriarchal society where men are the primary authority figures and women are subordinate. This has serious implications on women’s and men’s life prospects.

    Objective: The aim was to explore current gender roles in urban Pakistan, how these are reproduced and maintained and influence men’s and women’s life circumstances.

    Design: Five focus group discussions were conducted, including 28 women representing employed, unemployed, educated and uneducated women from different socio-economic strata. Manifest and latent content analyses were applied.

    Findings: Two major themes emerged during analysis: ‘Reiteration of gender roles’ and ‘Agents of change’. The first theme included perceptions of traditional gender roles and how these preserve women’s subordination. The power gradient, with men holding a superior position in relation to women, distinctive features in the culture and the role of the extended family were considered to interact to suppress women. The second theme included agents of change, where the role of education was prominent as well as the role of mass media. It was further emphasised that the younger generation was more positive to modernisation of gender roles than the elder generation.

    Conclusions: This study reveals serious gender inequalities and human rights violations against women in the Pakistani society. The unequal gender roles were perceived as static and enforced by structures imbedded in society. Women routinely faced serious restrictions and limitations of autonomy. However, attainment of higher levels of education especially not only for women but also for men was viewed as an agent towards change. Furthermore, mass media was perceived as having a positive role to play in supporting women’s empowerment.

  • 35. Ali, Tazeen S
    et al.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Violence permeating daily life: a qualitative study investigating perspectives on violence among women in Karachi, Pakistan2012In: International Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1179-1411, Vol. 4, 577-585 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This study explored how married women perceive situations which create family conflicts and lead to different forms of violence in urban Pakistan. In addition, it examines perceptions of consequences of violence, their adverse health effects, and how women resist violence within marital life.

    METHODS: Five focus group discussions were conducted with 28 women in Karachi. Purposive sampling, aiming for variety in age, employment status, education, and socioeconomic status, was employed. The focus group discussions were conducted in Urdu and translated into English. Manifest and latent content analysis were applied.

    RESULTS: One major theme emerged during the analysis, ie, family violence through the eyes of females. This theme was subdivided into three main categories. The first category, ie, situations provoking violence and their manifestations, elaborates on circumstances that provoke violence and situations that sustain violence. The second category, ie, actions and reactions to exposure to violence, describes consequences of ongoing violence within the family, including those that result in suicidal thoughts and actions. The final category, ie, resisting violence, describes how violence is avoided through women's awareness and actions.

    CONCLUSION: The current study highlights how female victims of abuse are trapped in a society where violence from a partner and family members is viewed as acceptable, where divorce is unavailable to the majority, and where societal support of women is limited. There is an urgent need to raise the subject of violence against women and tackle this human rights problem at all levels of society by targeting the individual, family, community, and societal levels concurrently.

  • 36. Ali, Tazeen S
    et al.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Intimate partner violence and mental health effects: a population-based study among married women in Karachi, Pakistan2013In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 20, no 1, 131-139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is recognized all over the world for its association with mental health problems in women. In Pakistan, such violence occurs commonly, but detailed information on mental health effects is scarce. The purpose of this study is to focused on married couples in urban Karachi to investigate mental health effects associated with physical, sexual and psychological violence perpetrated by husbands towards wives. Disclosure rates and health care-seeking behaviour were also investigated. METHOD: This cross-sectional study involved 759 women between the ages of 25 and 60 years, selected using a multi-stage random sampling technique. The women were interviewed by trained community midwives using a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: In the total population of women, mental symptoms were prevalent. Women subjected to any form of violence reported, however, considerably poorer mental health than unexposed women. A statistically significant difference for almost all of the studied health parameters persisted even after controlling for socio-demographic factors. The strongest associations were found for suicidal thoughts and physical violence (OR 4.41; 3.18-6.12), sexual abuse (OR 4.39; 3.17-6.07) and psychological abuse (OR 5.17; 3.28-8.15). The interviews revealed that only 27% of the women subjected to violence had disclosed this to anyone, in most cases to their parents. CONCLUSION: The findings in this study highlight that the violence women have to face contributes to the development of multiple forms of psychological stress and serious mental health problems. Women's restrictive life circumstances seriously hamper women's empowerment. Reliable health surveillance system and health care services are needed to serve abused women. Policy initiatives focused on IPV and gender inequality in Pakistan should be initiated.

  • 37. Alkema, Leontine
    et al.
    Chou, Doris
    Hogan, Daniel
    Zhang, Sanqian
    Moller, Ann-Beth
    Gemmill, Alison
    Fat, Doris Ma
    Boerma, Ties
    Temmerman, Marleen
    Mathers, Colin
    Say, Lale
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Global, regional, and national levels and trends in maternal mortality between 1990 and 2015, with scenario-based projections to 2030: a systematic analysis by the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10017, 462-474 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Millennium Development Goal 5 calls for a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) between 1990 and 2015. We estimated levels and trends in maternal mortality for 183 countries to assess progress made. Based on MMR estimates for 2015, we constructed projections to show the requirements for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of less than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 livebirths globally by 2030.

    METHODS: We updated the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group (MMEIG) database with more than 200 additional records (vital statistics from civil registration systems, surveys, studies, or reports). We generated estimates of maternal mortality and related indicators with 80% uncertainty intervals (UIs) using a Bayesian model. The model combines the rate of change implied by a multilevel regression model with a time-series model to capture data-driven changes in country-specific MMRs, and includes a data model to adjust for systematic and random errors associated with different data sources.

    RESULTS: We had data for 171 of 183 countries. The global MMR fell from 385 deaths per 100,000 livebirths (80% UI 359-427) in 1990, to 216 (207-249) in 2015, corresponding to a relative decline of 43·9% (34·0-48·7), with 303,000 (291,000-349,000) maternal deaths worldwide in 2015. Regional progress in reducing the MMR since 1990 ranged from an annual rate of reduction of 1·8% (0·0-3·1) in the Caribbean to 5·0% (4·0-6·0) in eastern Asia. Regional MMRs for 2015 ranged from 12 deaths per 100,000 livebirths (11-14) for high-income regions to 546 (511-652) for sub-Saharan Africa. Accelerated progress will be needed to achieve the SDG goal; countries will need to reduce their MMRs at an annual rate of reduction of at least 7·5%.

    INTERPRETATION: Despite global progress in reducing maternal mortality, immediate action is needed to meet the ambitious SDG 2030 target, and ultimately eliminate preventable maternal mortality. Although the rates of reduction that are needed to achieve country-specific SDG targets are ambitious for most high mortality countries, countries that made a concerted effort to reduce maternal mortality between 2000 and 2010 provide inspiration and guidance on how to accomplish the acceleration necessary to substantially reduce preventable maternal deaths.

    FUNDING: National University of Singapore, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, USAID, and the UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction.

  • 38.
    Allard, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Enteric adenovirus type 41: genome organization and specific detection procedures1992Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Enteric adenoviruses (EAd) types 40 and 41 (Ad40 and Ad41) representing subgenus F, are primary pathogens of children being second only to rotaviruses as the most important cause of infantile diarrhea.

    The EAds differ from all other adenoviruses in their inability to grow in most conventional established cell lines and have been suggested to be deficient in some early gene functions since they could be complemented by Ad 5 early regions EIA and E1B. In order to search for differences that could explain its characteristic growth restriction, the early regions EIA and E1B of Ad41 (strain D389) were sequenced, analysed and compared with the corresponding regions of Adl2, Ad7, Ad2, and Ad4. As revealed by the analysis of Ad2, three major mRNAs of 9S, 12S and 13S are generated from region EIA. The EIA region of Ad41 encodes two mRNAs corresponding to the 12S and 13S mRNAs. Only the 13S mRNA is transcribed at detectable levels. This mRNA can be translated into a 251 aa putative protein that contains the three highly conserved domains found in all other human adenoviruses and shown to be responsible for many important regulatory functions during infection.

    The E1B region of Ad41 encodes three transcripts that correspond to 22S, 14S and 9S mRNA of Ad2. No equivalent to the 13S mRNA of Ad2 E1B is found. In addition the Ad41 14S mRNA exhibits an additional exon of 23 bp created by a donor and an acceptor splice sites not desribed for other adenovirus E1B sequences.

    Due to their growth restriction in conventional cultures, rapid diagnostic procedures developed for the enteric adenovirus infections have mainly been aimed at the detection of viral antigens or nucleic acids. This thesis also describes several procedures developed for the general detection of adenoviruses and specific detection of the enteric types in stools specimens. General and specific hybridization assays were developed by use of two BamHI clones obtained from the EIA region of Ad41. One- and two-step PCR procedures were also developed for the general detection of adenoviruses using primers corresponding to highly conserved sequences within the hexon gene. Subgenus F specific one- and two-step PCRs were developed by using primers located in the Ad41 E1B region.

    The one-step PCR systems were tested and validated against isolation in tissue culture, DNA restriction enzyme analysis and a commercial latex agglutination test in the study of 60 specimens obtained from children with rotavirus negative diarrhea. The asymptomatic fecal excretion of adenoviruses was evaluated by two-step PCR amplifications on samples from 50 healthy children, 50 healthy adults, and 50 adults suffering from diarrhea.

    Finally, a simplified procedure for detection, discrimination and typing of EAd was also designed by combining the one-step PCR amplification of the hexon region with the restriction of the 300 bp product.

  • 39. Almquist, Ylva B
    et al.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Associations between social support and depressive symptoms: social causation or social selection-or both?2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no 1, 84-89 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have demonstrated an association between social support and health, almost regardless of how social support and health have been conceptualised or measured. Even so, the issue of causality has not yet been sufficiently addressed. This issue is particularly challenging for mental health problems such as depressive symptoms. The aim of the present study is to longitudinally assess structural and functional aspects of social support in relation to depressive symptoms in men and women, through a series of competing causal models that, in contrast to many other statistical methods, allow for bi-directional effects.

    METHODS: Questionnaire data from the Northern Swedish Cohort (n = 1001) were utilised for the years 1995 (age 30) and 2007 (age 42). Associations were analysed by means of gender-specific structural equation modelling, with structural and functional support modelled separately.

    RESULTS: Both structural and functional support were associated with depressive symptoms at ages 30 and 42, for men and women alike. A higher level of support, particularly functional support, was associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms over time among men. Among women, there were bi-directional effects of social support and depressive symptoms over time.

    CONCLUSION: Concerning social support and health, the social causation hypothesis seems relevant for men whereas, for women, the associations appear to be more complex. We conclude that preventive and health promoting work may need to consider that the presence of depressive symptoms in itself impedes on women's capability to increase their levels of social support.

  • 40.
    Almroth, Melody
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Music therapy and adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders: A literature review on the effects of music therapy2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 41. Alssema, M
    et al.
    Vistisen, D
    Heymans, M W
    Nijpels, G
    Glümer, C
    Zimmet, P Z
    Shaw, J E
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stehouwer, C D A
    Tabák, A G
    Colagiuri, S
    Borch-Johnsen, K
    Dekker, J M
    Risk scores for predicting type 2 diabetes: using the optimal tool2011In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 54, no 9, 2468-2470 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Amaku, M
    et al.
    Azevedo, F
    Burattini, M N
    Coelho, G E
    Coutinho, F A B
    Greenhalgh, D
    Lopez, L F
    Motitsuki, R S
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    Massad, E
    Magnitude and frequency variations of vector-borne infection outbreaks using the Ross-Macdonald model: explaining and predicting outbreaks of dengue fever2016In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 144, no 16, 3435-3450 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classical Ross-Macdonald model is often utilized to model vector-borne infections; however, this model fails on several fronts. First, using measured (or estimated) parameters, which values are accepted from the literature, the model predicts a much greater number of cases than what is usually observed. Second, the model predicts a single large outbreak that is followed by decades of much smaller outbreaks, which is not consistent with what is observed. Usually towns or cities report a number of recurrences for many years, even when environmental changes cannot explain the disappearance of the infection between the peaks. In this paper, we continue to examine the pitfalls in modelling this class of infections, and explain that, if properly used, the Ross-Macdonald model works and can be used to understand the patterns of epidemics and even, to some extent, be used to make predictions. We model several outbreaks of dengue fever and show that the variable pattern of yearly recurrence (or its absence) can be understood and explained by a simple Ross-Macdonald model modified to take into account human movement across a range of neighbourhoods within a city. In addition, we analyse the effect of seasonal variations in the parameters that determine the number, longevity and biting behaviour of mosquitoes. Based on the size of the first outbreak, we show that it is possible to estimate the proportion of the remaining susceptible individuals and to predict the likelihood and magnitude of the eventual subsequent outbreaks. This approach is described based on actual dengue outbreaks with different recurrence patterns from some Brazilian regions.

  • 43. Ameh, Soter
    et al.
    Gomez-Olive, Francesc Xavier
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in Developing Countries (INDEPTH), Accra, Ghana.
    Tollman, Stephen M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in Developing Countries (INDEPTH), Accra, Ghana.
    Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin
    Relationships between structure, process and outcome to assess quality of integrated chronic disease management in a rural South African setting: applying a structural equation model2017In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 17, 229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: South Africa faces a complex dual burden of chronic communicable and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). In response, the Integrated Chronic Disease Management (ICDM) model was initiated in primary health care (PHC) facilities in 2011 to leverage the HIV/ART programme to scale-up services for NCDs, achieve optimal patient health outcomes and improve the quality of medical care. However, little is known about the quality of care in the ICDM model. The objectives of this study were to: i) assess patients’ and operational managers’ satisfaction with the dimensions of ICDM services; and ii) evaluate the quality of care in the ICDM model using Avedis Donabedian’s theory of relationships between structure (resources), process (clinical activities) and outcome (desired result of healthcare) constructs as a measure of quality of care.

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 in seven PHC facilities in the Bushbuckridge municipality of Mpumalanga Province, north-east South Africa - an area underpinned by a robust Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS). The patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ-18), with measures reflecting structure/process/outcome (SPO) constructs, was adapted and administered to 435 chronic disease patients and the operational managers of all seven PHC facilities. The adapted questionnaire contained 17 dimensions of care, including eight dimensions identified as priority areas in the ICDM model - critical drugs, equipment, referral, defaulter tracing, prepacking of medicines, clinic appointments, waiting time, and coherence. A structural equation model was fit to operationalise Donabedian’s theory, using unidirectional, mediation, and reciprocal pathways.

    Results: The mediation pathway showed that the relationships between structure, process and outcome represented quality systems in the ICDM model. Structure correlated with process (0.40) and outcome (0.75). Given structure, process correlated with outcome (0.88). Of the 17 dimensions of care in the ICDM model, three structure (equipment, critical drugs, accessibility), three process (professionalism, friendliness and attendance to patients) and three outcome (competence, confidence and coherence) dimensions reflected their intended constructs.

    Conclusion: Of the priority dimensions, referrals, defaulter tracing, prepacking of medicines, appointments, and patient waiting time did not reflect their intended constructs. Donabedian’s theoretical framework can be used to provide evidence of quality systems in the ICDM model.

  • 44. Ameh, Soter
    et al.
    Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin
    D'ambruoso, Lucia
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in Developing Countries (INDEPTH) Accra, Ghana.
    Tollman, Stephen M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in Developing Countries (INDEPTH) Accra, Ghana.
    Gomez-Olive, Francesc Xavier
    Quality of integrated chronic disease care in rural South Africa: user and provider perspectives2017In: Health Policy and Planning, ISSN 0268-1080, E-ISSN 1460-2237, Vol. 32, no 2, 257-266 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model was introduced as a response to the dual burden of HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa, one of the first of such efforts by an African Ministry of Health. The aim of the ICDM model is to leverage HIV programme innovations to improve the quality of chronic disease care. There is a dearth of literature on the perspectives of healthcare providers and users on the quality of care in the novel ICDM model. This paper describes the viewpoints of operational managers and patients regarding quality of care in the ICDM model. In 2013, we conducted a case study of the seven PHC facilities in the rural Agincourt sub-district in northeast South Africa. Focus group discussions (n = 8) were used to obtain data from 56 purposively selected patients >= 18 years. In-depth interviews were conducted with operational managers of each facility and the sub-district health manager. Donabedian's structure, process and outcome theory for service quality evaluation underpinned the conceptual framework in this study. Qualitative data were analysed, with MAXQDA 2 software, to identify 17 a priori dimensions of care and unanticipated themes that emerged during the analysis. The manager and patient narratives showed the inadequacies in structure (malfunctioning blood pressure machines and staff shortage); process (irregular prepacking of drugs); and outcome (long waiting times). There was discordance between managers and patients regarding reasons for long patient waiting time which managers attributed to staff shortage and missed appointments, while patients ascribed it to late arrival of managers to the clinics. Patients reported anti-hypertension drug stock-outs (structure); sub-optimal defaulter-tracing (process); rigid clinic appointment system (process). Emerging themes showed that patients reported HIV stigmatisation in the community due to defaulter-tracing activities of home-based carers, while managers reported treatment of chronic diseases by traditional healers and reduced facility-related HIV stigma because HIV and NCD patients attended the same clinic. Leveraging elements of HIV programmes for NCDs, specifically hypertension management, is yet to be achieved in the study setting in part because of malfunctioning blood pressure machines and anti-hypertension drug stock-outs. This has implications for the nationwide scale up of the ICDM model in South Africa and planning of an integrated chronic disease care in other low-and middle-income countries.

  • 45. Ameh, Soter
    et al.
    Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin
    Musenge, Eustasius
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Publ Hlth, Fac Hlth Sci, Med Res Council,Wits Univ Rural Publ Hlth, Johannesburg, South Africa ; Int Network Demog Evaluat Populat & Their Hlth De, Accra, Ghana ; Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Publ Hlth, Fac Hlth Sci, Hlth Transit Res Unit Agincourt, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Tollman, Stephen
    Gomez-Olive, Francesc Xavier
    Effectiveness of an Integrated Approach to HIV and Hypertension Care in Rural South Africa: Controlled Interrupted Time-Series Analysis2017In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, ISSN 1525-4135, E-ISSN 1944-7884, Vol. 75, no 4, 472-479 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: South Africa faces a dual burden of HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases. In 2011, a pilot integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model was introduced by the National Health Department into selected primary health care (PHC) facilities. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the ICDM model in controlling patients' CD4 counts (>350 cells/mm(3)) and blood pressure [BP (<140/90 mm Hg)] in PHC facilities in the Bushbuckridge municipality, South Africa. Methods: A controlled interrupted time-series study was conducted using the data from patients' clinical records collected multiple times before and after the ICDM model was initiated in PHC facilities in Bushbuckridge. Patients >18 years were recruited by proportionate sampling from the pilot (n = 435) and comparing (n = 443) PHC facilities from 2011 to 2013. Health outcomes for patients were retrieved from facility records for 30 months. We performed controlled segmented regression to model the monthly averages of individuals' propensity scores using autoregressive moving average model at 5% significance level. Results: The pilot facilities had 6% greater likelihood of controlling patients' CD4 counts than the comparison facilities (coefficient = 0.057; 95% confidence interval: 0.056 to 0.058; P < 0.001). Compared with the comparison facilities, the pilot facilities had 1.0% greater likelihood of controlling patients' BP (coefficient = 0.010; 95% confidence interval: 0.003 to 0.016; P = 0.002). Conclusions: Application of the model had a small effect in controlling patients' CD4 counts and BP, but showed no overall clinical benefit for the patients; hence, the need to more extensively leverage the HIV program for hypertension treatment.

  • 46.
    Amroussia, Nada
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    "Is the doctor God to punish me?!!": Childbirth experiences and self-perceptions of single mothers in Tunisia2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Worldwide, single mothers are considered a vulnerable group in the society. This vulnerability draws on multiple factors and it is reflected in different aspects of women's social, economic and health status depending on the context. In Tunisia, single mothers suffer from social stigmatization and socio-economic marginalization. There are few studies that have explored the social aspects of single motherhood in Tunisia, but, to the authors’ knowledge, the experiences of single mothers with the maternal health services facilities have not been explored yet. The general aim of this study is to explore the childbirth experiences of single mothers at the public health facilities in Tunisia.

    Methods: The thesis follows a qualitative design. In collaboration with non-governmental organizations in Tunisia, 11 single mothers were interviewed in regard to their experiences with maternal health care services and their perceptions of the attitudes of the health workers towards them. The interviews also addressed the barriers faced by these women in accessing adequate maternal health care services, and their self-perceptions as single mothers. The data was analyzed using an inductive thematic approach to generate codes. The development of themes was guided by a theoretical framework that connects the gender relational theory and the intersectional approach.

    Results: Three themes emerged during the data analysis. The first theme "Health systems disciplines single mothers" describes the relation between the single mothers and the maternal health care providers. The majority of the participants were subjected to discriminatory practices, neglect and even violence inflicted by the maternal health care providers. Few of the participants described positive childbirth experiences that are considered as signs of resistance. The second theme "If a woman makes a mistakes once. She has to pay for the rest of her life" reflects the self-perceptions of the participants as single mothers. The participants' self-perceptions are multifaceted: they are overwhelmed mothers living with a persistent feeling of guilt, and they are also challenging and determined mothers. The last theme "The trilogy of vulnerability" includes: the social stigmatization and the socio-economic marginalization experienced by the participants as single mothers, and the situation of the health system described as crumbling by the participants.

    Conclusion: The study highlights that childbirth experiences of single mothers are shaped by intersectional factors that go beyond the health system. Gender plays a major role in constructing these experiences while intersecting with other social structures. The participants had experienced disrespectful and discriminatory practices and even violence when they sought maternal health care services at the public health facilities in Tunisia. Those experiences reflect how the health system translate in its practices the discrimination and stigma culturally associated with single motherhood in this setting. Social discrimination and stigma did not only affect how single mother were treated during the childbirth, but also how they perceived themselves. Thus, ensuring women's right to dignified, respectful health care during childbirth requires tackling the underlying causes of women's marginalization and discrimination in many settings where women face the contingency of multiple social inequities.

  • 47.
    Amroussia, Nada
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Reproductive health policy in Tunisia (1994-2014): Impact on women's right to reproductive health and gender empowerment2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Tunisia was regarded as a pioneer in adopting a successful population policy in North Africa and the Middle East region. The Tunisian official family planning program started in 1966 with an objective of controlling population growth. After the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo in 1994, there was a shift in the Tunisian population policy as the concept of reproductive health was introduced for the first time in national health programs and strategies.

    Methods: The thesis is a policy analysis of the reproductive health policy in Tunisia from a human rights based approach using the Health Rights of Women Assessment Instrument (HeRWAI). The analysis focuses on the impact of this policy on women’s right to reproductive health and gender empowerment.

    Results: The results revealed that Tunisia has started adopting laws promoting for reproductive rights since 1960s, in the form of the right to contraceptive use and the right to abortion. However, slow progress has been made since the ICPD conference in 1994. Furthermore,   significant limitations were found in the implementation of reproductive health policy in relation to women’s right to reproductive health: regional inequities in women’s access to reproductive health care services, discriminatory practices affecting single women and HIV patients, low quality of maternal care services and delay in the integration of the gender-based violence component into the reproductive health care services. The thesis also found that there was a lack of meaningful engagement in action to achieve gender equality in Tunisia. 

  • 48.
    Amroussia, Nada
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hernandez, Alison
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Reproductive health policy in Tunisia: women's right to reproductive health and gender empowerment2016In: Health and Human Rights: An International Journal, ISSN 1079-0969, E-ISSN 2150-4113, Vol. 18, no 2, 183-194 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Tunisia is regarded as a pioneer in the Middle East and North Africa in terms of women's status and rights, including sexual and reproductive health and rights, evidence points to a number of persisting challenges. This article uses the Health Rights of Women Assessment Instrument (HeRWAI) to analyze Tunisia's reproductive health policy between 1994 and 2014. It explores the extent to which reproductive rights have been incorporated into the country's reproductive health policy, the gaps in the implementation of this policy, and the influence of this policy on gender empowerment. Our results reveal that progress has been slow in terms of incorporating reproductive rights into the national reproductive health policy. Furthermore, the implementation of this policy has fallen short, as demonstrated by regional inequities in the accessibility and availability of reproductive health services, the low quality of maternal health care services, and discriminatory practices. Finally, the government's lack of meaningful engagement in advancing gender empowerment stands in the way as the main challenge to gender equality in Tunisia.

  • 49.
    Amroussia, Nada
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Mosquera, Paola A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Explaining mental health inequalities in Northern Sweden: a decomposition analysis2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, 1305814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There has been a substantial increase of income inequalities in Sweden over the last 20 years, which also could be reflected in health inequalities, including mental health inequalities. Despite the growing body of literature focusing on health inequalities in Sweden, income-related inequalities in mental health have received little attention. Particularly scarce are research from Northern Sweden and examinations of the social determinants of health inequalities.

    Objectives: The present study seeks to provide evidence regarding inequalities in mental health in Northern Sweden. The specific aims were to (1) quantify the income-related inequality in mental health in Northern Sweden, and (2) determine the contribution of social determinants to the inequality.

    Methods: The study population comprised 25,646 participants of the 2014 Health on Equal Terms survey in the four northernmost counties of Sweden, aged 16 to 84 years old. Income-related inequalities in mental health were quantified by the concentration index and further decomposed by applying Wagstaff-type decomposition analysis.

    Results: The overall concentration index of mental health in Northern Sweden was −0.15 (95% CI: −0.17 to −0.13), indicating income inequalities in mental health disfavoring the less affluent population. The decomposition analysis results revealed that socio-economic conditions, including employment status (31%), income (22.6%), and cash margin (14%), made the largest contribution to the pro-rich inequalities in mental health. The second-largest contribution came from demographic factors, mainly age (11.3%) and gender (6%). Psychosocial factors were of smaller importance, with perceived discrimination (8%) and emotional support (3.4%) making moderate contributions to the health inequalities. 

    Conclusions: The present study demonstrates substantial income-related mental health inequalities in Northern Sweden, and provides insights into their underpinnings. These findings suggest that addressing the root causes is essential for promoting mental health equity in this region.

  • 50.
    Amroussia, Nada
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hernandez, Alison
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Vives-Cases, Carmen
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    "Is the doctor God to punish me?!": An intersectional examination of disrespectful and abusive care during childbirth against single mothers in Tunisia2017In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 14, 32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Disrespectful and abusive treatment during childbirth is a violation of women's right to dignified, respectful healthcare throughout pregnancy and childbirth. Although reports point out that marginalized groups in society such as single mothers are particularly vulnerable to abusive and disrespectful care, there is a lack of in-depth research exploring single mothers' encounters at the maternal healthcare facilities, especially in Tunisia. In Tunisia, single mothers are particularly vulnerable due to their social stigmatization and socio-economic marginalization. This study examines the self-perceptions and childbirth experiences of single mothers at the public healthcare facilities in Tunisia.

    METHODS: This study follows a qualitative design. Eleven single mothers were interviewed in regard to their experiences with maternal healthcare services and their perceptions of the attitudes of the health workers towards them. The interviews also addressed the barriers faced by the participants in accessing adequate maternal healthcare services, and their self-perceptions as single mothers. The data were analyzed using an inductive thematic approach guided by the feminist intersectional approach. Emergent codes were grouped into three final themes.

    RESULTS: Three themes emerged during the data analysis: 1) Experiencing disrespect and abuse, 2) Perceptions of regret and shame attributed to being a single mother, and 3) The triad of vulnerability: stigma, social challenges, and health system challenges. The study highlights that the childbirth experiences of single mothers are shaped by intersectional factors that go beyond the health system. Gender plays a major role in constructing these experiences while intersecting with other social structures. The participants had experienced disrespectful and discriminatory practices and even violence when they sought maternal healthcare services at the public healthcare facilities in Tunisia. Those experiences reflect not only the poor quality of maternal health services but also how health system practices translate the stigma culturally associated with single motherhood in this setting. Social stigma did not only affect how single mothers were treated during the childbirth, but also how they perceived themselves and how they perceived their care.

    CONCLUSION: Ensuring women's right to dignified, respectful healthcare during childbirth requires tackling the underlying causes of social inequalities leading to women's marginalization and discrimination.

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