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  • 1.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Personalens hälsa och arbetsmiljö2009In: Prehospital akutsjukvård / [ed] Björn-Ove Suserud och Leif Svensson, Stockholm: Liber, 2009, p. 33-38Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2. Aboagye, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Axén, Iben
    Kwak, Lydia
    Lohela-Karlsson, Malin
    Skillgate, Eva
    Dahlgren, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Jensen, Irene
    Individual preferences for physical exercise as secondary prevention for non-specific low back pain: a discrete choice experiment2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0187709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exercise is effective in improving non-specific low back pain (LBP). Certain components of physical exercise, such as the type, intensity and frequency of exercise, are likely to influence participation among working adults with non-specific LBP, but the value and relative importance of these components remain unknown. The study's aim was to examine such specific components and their influence on individual preferences for exercise for secondary prevention of non-specific LBP among working adults. Methods: In a discrete choice experiment, working individuals with non-specific LBP answered a webbased questionnaire. Each respondent was given ten pairs of hypothetical exercise programs and asked to choose one option from each pair. The choices comprised six attributes of exercise (i.e., type of training, design, intensity, frequency, proximity and incentives), each with either three or four levels. A conditional logit regression that reflected the random utility model was used to analyze the responses. Results: The final study population consisted of 112 participants. The participants' preferred exercise option was aerobic (i.e., cardiovascular) rather than strength training, group exercise with trainer supervision, rather than individual or unsupervised exercise. They also preferred high intensity exercise performed at least once or twice per week. The most popular types of incentive were exercise during working hours and a wellness allowance rather than coupons for sports goods. The results show that the relative value of some attribute levels differed between young adults (age <= 44 years) and older adults (age <= 45 years) in terms of the level of trainer supervision required, exercise intensity, travel time to exercise location and financial incentives. For active study participants, exercise frequency (i.e., twice per week, 1.15; CI: 0.25; 2.06) influenced choice of exercise. For individuals with more than one child, travel time (i.e., 20 minutes, - 0.55; CI: 0.65; 3.26) was also an influential attribute for choice of exercise, showing that people with children at home preferred to exercise close to home. Conclusions: This study adds to our knowledge about what types of exercise working adults with back pain are most likely to participate in. The exercise should be a cardiovascular type of training carried out in a group with trainer supervision. It should also be of high intensity and preferably performed twice per week during working hours. Coupons for sports goods do not appear to motivate physical activity among workers with LBP. The findings of the study could have a substantial impact on the planning and development of exercise provision and promotion strategies to improve non-specific LBP. Providers and employers may be able to improve participation in exercise programs for adults with non-specific LBP by focusing on the exercise components which are the most attractive. This in turn would improve satisfaction and adherence to exercise interventions aimed at preventing recurrent non-specific LBP.

  • 3. Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Calciano, Lucia
    Johannessen, Ane
    Portas, Laura
    Benediktsdóttir, Bryndis
    Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen
    Bråbäck, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Carsin, Anne-Elie
    Dharmage, Shyamali C.
    Dratva, Julia
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gomez Real, Francisco
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Holloway, John W.
    Holm, Mathias
    Janson, Christer
    Jögi, Rain
    Leynaert, Bénédicte
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Martínez-Moratalla Rovira, Jesús
    Raherison, Chantal
    Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis
    Schlünssen, Vivi
    Bono, Roberto
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Demoly, Pascal
    Dorado Arenas, Sandra
    Nowak, Dennis
    Pin, Isabelle
    Weyler, Joost
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Svanes, Cecilie
    A three-generation study on the association of tobacco smoking with asthma2018In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 1106-1117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mothers' smoking during pregnancy increases asthma risk in their offspring. There is some evidence that grandmothers' smoking may have a similar effect, and biological plausibility that fathers' smoking during adolescence may influence offspring's health through transmittable epigenetic changes in sperm precursor cells. We evaluated the three-generation associations of tobacco smoking with asthma.

    Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, at the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III clinical interview, 2233 mothers and 1964 fathers from 26 centres reported whether their offspring (aged ≤51 years) had ever had asthma and whether it had coexisted with nasal allergies or not. Mothers and fathers also provided information on their parents' (grandparents) and their own asthma, education and smoking history. Multilevel mediation models within a multicentre three-generation framework were fitted separately within the maternal (4666 offspring) and paternal (4192 offspring) lines.

    Results: Fathers' smoking before they were 15 [relative risk ratio (RRR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-2.01] and mothers' smoking during pregnancy (RRR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.01-1.59) were associated with asthma without nasal allergies in their offspring. Grandmothers' smoking during pregnancy was associated with asthma in their daughters [odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.17-2.06] and with asthma with nasal allergies in their grandchildren within the maternal line (RRR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02-1.55).

    Conclusions: Fathers' smoking during early adolescence and grandmothers' and mothers' smoking during pregnancy may independently increase asthma risk in offspring. Thus, risk factors for asthma should be sought in both parents and before conception.

  • 4. Adam, Martin
    et al.
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Carsin, Anne Elie
    Cai, Yutong
    Jacquemin, Benedicte
    Sanchez, Margaux
    Vierkötter, Andrea
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Keidel, Dirk
    Sugiri, Dorothee
    Al Kanani, Zaina
    Nadif, Rachel
    Siroux, Valérie
    Hardy, Rebecca
    Kuh, Diana
    Rochat, Thierry
    Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Villani, Simona
    Phuleria, Harish Chandra
    Birk, Matthias
    Cyrys, Josef
    Cirach, Marta
    de Nazelle, Audrey
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Declerq, Christophe
    Bono, Roberto
    Piccioni, Pavilio
    Quass, Ulrich
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Pin, Isabelle
    Beelen, Rob
    Hoek, Gerard
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Schindler, Christian
    Sunyer, Jordi
    Krämer, Ursula
    Kauffmann, Francine
    Hansell, Anna L
    Künzli, Nino
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Adult lung function and long-term air pollution exposure. ESCAPE: a multicentre cohort study and meta-analysis2015In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 38-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chronic impact of ambient air pollutants on lung function in adults is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with lung function in adult participants from five cohorts in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Residential exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was modelled and traffic indicators were assessed in a standardised manner. The spirometric parameters forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) from 7613 subjects were considered as outcomes. Cohort-specific results were combined using meta-analysis. We did not observe an association of air pollution with longitudinal change in lung function, but we observed that a 10 μg·m(-3) increase in NO2 exposure was associated with lower levels of FEV1 (-14.0 mL, 95%CI -25.8- -2.1) and FVC (-14.9 mL, 95% CI -28.7- -1.1). An increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, but not other PM metrics (PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM, PM absorbance), was associated with a lower level of FEV1 (-44.6 mL, 95% CI -85.4- -3.8) and FVC (-59.0 mL, 95% CI -112.3- -5.6). The associations were particularly strong in obese persons. This study adds to the evidence for an adverse association of ambient air pollution with lung function in adults at very low levels in Europe.

  • 5. Adam-Poupart, Ariane
    et al.
    Labreche, France
    Smargiassi, Audrey
    Duguay, Patrice
    Busque, Marc-Antoine
    Gagne, Charles
    Rintamaki, Hannu
    Kjellström, Tord
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Zayed, Joseph
    Climate Change and Occupational Health and Safety in a Temperate Climate: Potential Impacts and Research Priorities in Quebec, Canada2013In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 68-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential impacts of climate change (CC) on Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) have been studied a little in tropical countries, while they received no attention in northern industrialized countries with a temperate climate. This work aimed to establish an overview of the potential links between CC and OHS in those countries and to determine research priorities for Quebec, Canada. A narrative review of the scientific literature (2005-2010) was presented to a working group of international and national experts and stakeholders during a workshop held in 2010. The working group was invited to identify knowledge gaps, and a modified Delphi method helped prioritize research avenues. This process highlighted five categories of hazards that are likely to impact OHS in northern industrialized countries: heat waves/increased temperatures, air pollutants, UV radiation, extreme weather events, vector-borne/zoonotic diseases. These hazards will affect working activities related to natural resources (i.e. agriculture, fishing and forestry) and may influence the socioeconomic context (built environment and green industries), thus indirectly modifying OHS. From this consensus approach, three categories of research were identified: 1) Knowledge acquisition on hazards, target populations and methods of adaptation; 2) Surveillance of diseases/accidents/occupational hazards; and 3) Development of new occupational adaptation strategies.

  • 6. Aggett, Peter
    et al.
    Nordberg, Gunnar F
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordberg, Monica
    Essential metals: assessing risks from dificiency and toxicity2015In: Handbook on the toxicology of metals: Volume I: General considerations / [ed] Gunnar F. Nordberg, Bruce A. Fowler, Monica Nordberg, Academic Press, 2015, 4, p. 281-297Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recommendations aimed at protecting the public from toxicity of essential elements including essential metals have usually been developed separately from those recommendations aimed at protection from deficiency. Because of the uncertainties involved in the evaluations, these recommendations have sometimes been in conflict, emphasizing the need for a new approach, including a balanced consideration of nutritional and toxicological data. In developing these new principles of evaluation, some basic concepts based on interindividual variability in sensitivity to deficiency and toxicity must be considered. Such variation translates into one interval of (low) daily intakes, at which there is a risk of developing deficiency, and another interval of (high) dietary intakes at which toxicity may occur. In most instances, there is a third set of intakes in between, which represents the acceptable range of oral intake (AROI), in which no adverse effects occur. It must be noted, however, that a range cannot be found that protects all persons from adverse effects. Those persons with genetically determined sensitivity may require higher intakes to avoid deficiency or lower intakes to avoid toxicity than those defined by the AROI. The AROI is defined as protecting 95% of an unselected human population from minimal adverse effects of deficiency or toxicity.

  • 7. Akesson, Agneta
    et al.
    Barregard, Lars
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Nordberg, Gunnar F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordberg, Monica
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Non-Renal Effects and the Risk Assessment of Environmental Cadmium Exposure2014In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 122, no 5, p. 431-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exposure to cadmium (Cd) has long been recognized as a health hazard, both in industry and in general populations with high exposure. Under the currently prevailing health risk assessment, the relationship between urinary Cd (U-Cd) concentrations and tubular proteinuria is used. However, doubts have recently been raised regarding the justification of basing the risk assessment on this relationship at very low exposure. Objectives: Our objective was to review available information on health effects of Cd exposure with respect to human health risk assessment. Discussion: The associations between U-Cd and urinary proteins at very low exposure may not be due to Cd toxicity, and the clinical significance of slight proteinuria may also be limited. More importantly, other effects have been reported at very low Cd exposure. There is reason to challenge the basis of the existing health risk assessment for Cd. Our review of the literature found that exposure to low concentrations of Cd is associated with effects on bone, including increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures, and that this observation has implications for the health risk assessment of Cd. Other effects associated with Cd should also be considered, in particular cancer, although the information is still too limited for appropriate use in quantitative risk assessment. Conclusion: Non-renal effects should be considered critical effects in the health risk assessment of Cd.

  • 8.
    Alasalmi, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Spirometry in medical surveillance of asbestosis and silicosis: Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 9. Alghadir, Ahmad
    et al.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Iqbal, Zaheen A.
    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia2015In: Journal of Physical Therapy Science, ISSN 0915-5287, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 1107-1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [Purpose] Musculoskeletal disorders are common causes of work-related disability in different professions involving the frequent practice of lifting, stooping, twisting, prolonged sitting, or standing. The dental profession is one such profession. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia, the factors associated with them, and their consequences and to propose preventive measures for them.

    [Subjects and Methods] A self-administered online questionnaire was sent to 225 members of the Saudi Dental Association. It included questions on demographic and professional characteristics, general medical history, and history of work-related musculoskeletal disorders before and after joining the dental profession.

    [Results] The questionnaire was completed by 65% of the respondents. Among them 85% reported that they had developed some pain due to work after joining the dental profession, and 42% reported that they were suffering pain at the time of the survey. Besides lower back, shoulder, and neck regions, the hands, upper back, and other regions like the elbows, buttocks, thighs, leg, and feet were areas in which they pain.

    [Conclusion] The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia is high, affecting their daily activities, sometimes even forcing them to change their work setting. Age, gender, specialty of work, work setting, number of contact hours with patients, etc., were all found to be related to their work-related pain. We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics, counseling, proper techniques of patient handling, etc., during the training of dental professionals so that they can work efficiently.

  • 10. Al-Shamkhi, N.
    et al.
    Alving, K.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Hedlin, G.
    Middelveld, R.
    Bjerg, A.
    Ekerljung, L.
    Olin, A. C.
    Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Janson, C.
    Malinovschi, A.
    Important non-disease-related determinants of exhaled nitric oxide levels in mild asthma: results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN study2016In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 1185-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has a potential clinical role in asthma management. Constitutive factors such as age, height and male gender, as well as individual characteristics, as IgE sensitisation and smoking, affect levels of FeNO in population-based studies. However their effect on FeNO in subjects with asthma has been scarcely studied.

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects on FeNO of these commonly regarded determinants, as demonstrated in healthy subjects, as well as menarche age and parental smoking, in a population of asthmatics.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: FeNO was measured in 557 subjects with asthma from the Swedish GA2LEN study. Allergic sensitisation was assessed by skin prick tests to most common aeroallergens. Upper airway comorbidities, smoking habits, smoking exposure during childhood, hormonal status (for women) were questionnaire-assessed.

    RESULTS: Male gender (p<0.001), greater height (p<0.001) and sensitisation to both perennial allergens and pollen (p<0.001) related to higher FeNO levels. Current smoking (p<0.001) and having both parents smoking during childhood, vs having neither (p<0.001) or only one parent smoking (p=0.002), related to lower FeNO. Women with menarche between 9-11 years of age had lower FeNO than those with menarche between 12-14 years of age (p = 0.03) or 15-17 years of age (p=0.003).

    CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Interpreting FeNO levels in clinical practice is complex and constitutional determinants, as well as smoking and IgE sensitization, are of importance in asthmatic subjects and should be accounted for when interpreting FeNO levels. Furthermore, menarche age and parental smoking during childhood and their effects on lowering FeNO deserve further studies.

  • 11. Amaral, André F S
    et al.
    Newson, Roger B
    Abramson, Michael J
    Antó, Josep M
    Bono, Roberto
    Corsico, Angelo G
    de Marco, Roberto
    Demoly, Pascal
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Huerta, Ismael
    Janson, Christer
    Jõgi, Rain
    Kim, Jeong-Lim
    Maldonado, José
    Martinez-Moratalla Rovira, Jesús
    Neukirch, Catherine
    Nowak, Dennis
    Pin, Isabelle
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Raherison-Semjen, Chantal
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Urrutia Landa, Isabel
    van Ree, Ronald
    Versteeg, Serge A
    Weyler, Joost
    Zock, Jan-Paul
    Burney, Peter G J
    Jarvis, Deborah L
    Changes in IgE sensitization and total IgE levels over 20 years of follow-up2016In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 137, no 6, p. 1788-1795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of sensitization in older adults, but few longitudinal studies have examined whether this is an aging or a year-of-birth cohort effect.

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess changes in sensitization and total IgE levels in a cohort of European adults as they aged over a 20-year period.

    METHODS: Levels of serum specific IgE to common aeroallergens (house dust mite, cat, and grass) and total IgE levels were measured in 3206 adults from 25 centers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey on 3 occasions over 20 years. Changes in sensitization and total IgE levels were analyzed by using regression analysis corrected for potential differences in laboratory equipment and by using inverse sampling probability weights to account for nonresponse.

    RESULTS: Over the 20-year follow-up, the prevalence of sensitization to at least 1 of the 3 allergens decreased from 29.4% to 24.8% (-4.6%; 95% CI, -7.0% to -2.1%). The prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite (-4.3%; 95% CI, -6.0% to -2.6%) and cat (-2.1%; 95% CI, -3.6% to -0.7%) decreased more than sensitization to grass (-0.6%; 95% CI, -2.5% to 1.3%). Age-specific prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite and cat did not differ between year-of-birth cohorts, but sensitization to grass was most prevalent in the most recent ones. Overall, total IgE levels decreased significantly (geometric mean ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.58-0.68) at all ages in all year-of-birth cohorts.

    CONCLUSION: Aging was associated with lower levels of sensitization, especially to house dust mite and cat, after the age of 20 years.

  • 12. Analitis, Antonis
    et al.
    De' Donato, Francesca
    Scortichini, Matteo
    Lanki, Timo
    Basagana, Xavier
    Ballester, Ferran
    Åström, Christofer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Paldy, Anna
    Pascal, Mathilde
    Gasparrini, Antonio
    Michelozzi, Paola
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Synergistic Effects of Ambient Temperature and Air Pollution on Health in Europe: Results from the PHASE Project2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 1-11, article id E1856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the potential synergy between air pollution and meteorology and their impact on mortality in nine European cities with data from 2004 to 2010. We used daily series of Apparent Temperature (AT), measurements of particulate matter (PM10), ozone (O₃), and nitrogen dioxide (NO₂) and total non-accidental, cardiovascular, and respiratory deaths. We applied Poisson regression for city-specific analysis and random effects meta-analysis to combine city-specific results, separately for the warm and cold seasons. In the warm season, the percentage increase in all deaths from natural causes per °C increase in AT tended to be greater during high ozone days, although this was only significant for all ages when all causes were considered. On low ozone days, the increase in the total daily number of deaths was 1.84% (95% CI 0.87, 2.82), whilst it was 2.20% (95% CI 1.28, 3.13) in the high ozone days per 1 °C increase in AT. Interaction with PM10 was significant for cardiovascular (CVD) causes of death for all ages (2.24% on low PM10 days (95% CI 1.01, 3.47) whilst it is 2.63% (95% CI 1.57, 3.71) on high PM10 days) and for ages 75+. In days with heat waves, no consistent pattern of interaction was observed. For the cold period, no evidence for synergy was found. In conclusion, some evidence of interactive effects between hot temperature and the levels of ozone and PM10 was found, but no consistent synergy could be identified during the cold season.

  • 13. Andersen, Zorana J.
    et al.
    Pedersen, Marie
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Galassi, Claudia
    Jørgensen, Jeanette T.
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aasvang, Gunn Marit
    Schwarze, Per
    Pyko, Andrei
    Pershagen, Göran
    Korek, Michal
    De Faire, Ulf
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Eriksen, Kirsten T.
    Poulsen, Aslak H.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Vaclavik Bräuner, Elvira
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Jaensch, Andrea
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Lang, Alois
    Wang, Meng
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Grioni, Sara
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Migliore, Enrica
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Sokhi, Ranjeet
    Keuken, Menno
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Beelen, Rob
    Vineis, Paolo
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Long-term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Brain Tumor: the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 420-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and brain tumor risk is sparse and inconsistent.

    Methods: In 12 cohorts from 6 European countries, individual estimates of annual mean air pollution levels at the baseline residence were estimated by standardized land-use regression models developed within the ESCAPE and TRANSPHORM projects: particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5, ≤10, and 2.5–10 μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx) and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations of air pollutant concentrations and traffic intensity with total, malignant, and nonmalignant brain tumor, in separate Cox regression models, adjusting for risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses.

    Results: Of 282194 subjects from 12 cohorts, 466 developed malignant brain tumors during 12 years of follow-up. Six of the cohorts also had data on nonmalignant brain tumor, where among 106786 subjects, 366 developed brain tumor: 176 nonmalignant and 190 malignant. We found a positive, statistically nonsignificant association between malignant brain tumor and PM2.5 absorbance (hazard ratio and 95% CI: 1.67; 0.89–3.14 per 10–5/m3), and weak positive or null associations with the other pollutants. Hazard ratio for PM2.5 absorbance (1.01; 0.38–2.71 per 10–5/m3) and all other pollutants were lower for nonmalignant than for malignant brain tumors.

    Conclusion: We found suggestive evidence of an association between long-term exposure to PM2.5 absorbance indicating traffic-related air pollution and malignant brain tumors, and no association with overall or nonmalignant brain tumors.

  • 14. Andersen, Zorana J.
    et al.
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Pedersen, Marie
    Galassi, Claudia
    Jørgensen, Jeanette T.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aasvang, Gunn Marit
    Aamodt, Geir
    Pyko, Andrei
    Pershagen, Göran
    Korek, Michal
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Eriksen, Kirsten T.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Plusquin, Michelle
    Key, Timothy J.
    Jaensch, Andrea
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Lang, Alois
    Wang, Meng
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Fournier, Agnes
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Baglietto, Laura
    Grioni, Sara
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Migliore, Enrica
    Tamayo-Uria, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Sokhi, Ranjeet
    Keuken, Menno
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Beelen, Rob
    Vineis, Paolo
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in 15 European cohorts within the ESCAPE project2017In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 125, no 10, article id 107005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and breast cancer risk is inconsistent.

    OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in European women.

    METHODS: In 15 cohorts from nine European countries, individual estimates of air pollution levels at the residence were estimated by standardized land-use regression models developed within the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) and Transport related Air Pollution and Health impacts – Integrated Methodologies for Assessing Particulate Matter (TRANSPHORM) projects: particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5μm, ≤10μm, and 2.5–10μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse, respectively); PM2.5 absorbance; nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx); traffic intensity; and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations between breast cancer and air pollutants using Cox regression models, adjusting for major lifestyle risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses.

    RESULTS: Of 74,750 postmenopausal women included in the study, 3,612 developed breast cancer during 991,353 person-years of follow-up. We found positive and statistically insignificant associations between breast cancer and PM2.5 {hazard ratio (HR)=1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77, 1.51] per 5 μg/m(3)}, PM10 [1.07 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.30) per 10 μg/m(3)], PMcoarse[1.20 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.49 per 5 μg/m(3)], and NO(2) [1.02 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.07 per 10 μg/m(3)], and a statistically significant association with NOx [1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.08) per 20 μg/m(3), p=0.04].

    CONCLUSIONS: We found suggestive evidence of an association between ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in European women.

  • 15. Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Murgia, Nicola
    Nilsson, Tohr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Torén, Kjell
    Incidence of chronic bronchitis in a cohort of pulp mill workers with repeated gassings to sulphur dioxide and other irritant gases2013In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 12, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to irritants is associated with chronic bronchitis. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether repeated peak exposures with respiratory symptoms, gassings, to sulphur dioxide (SO2) and other irritant gases could increase the risk of chronic bronchitis.

    METHODS: The study population comprised 3,060 Swedish pulp mill workers (84% males) from a cohort study, who completed a comprehensive questionnaire with items on chronic bronchitis symptoms, smoking habit, occupational history, and specific exposures, including gassings. 2,037 have worked in sulphite mills. Incidence rates and hazard ratios (HRs) for the observation period, 1970-2000, in relation to exposure and the frequency of repeated gassings to SO2 and other irritant gases were calculated.

    RESULTS: The incidence rate for chronic bronchitis among workers with repeated gassings was 3.5/1,000 person-years compared with 1.5/1,000 person-years among unexposed workers (HR 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-3.1). The risk was even higher in the subgroup with frequent gassings (HR 3.2, 95% CI 2.0-5.2), particularly among never-smokers (HR 8.7, 95% CI 3.5-22).

    CONCLUSIONS: Repeated gassings to irritant gases increased the incidence of chronic bronchitis in our study population during and after work in pulp mills, supporting the hypothesis that occupational exposures to irritants negatively affect the airways. These results underscore the importance of preventive actions in this work environment.

  • 16.
    Andersson, John
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sundström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Road traffic noise, air pollution, and risk of dementia: results from the Betula project2018In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 166, p. 334-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is growing evidence for a negative impact of traffic-related air pollution on risk of dementia.However, the contribution of noise exposure to this association has been rarely examined.

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the individual and combined effect of noise and air pollution on risk ofdementia.

    Methods: Data on dementia incidence over a 15 year period was obtained from the Betula project, a longitudinalstudy on health and ageing. Estimates of annual mean levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the participants’ residentialaddress were obtained using a land-use regression model. Modelled data provided road traffic noiselevels (Leq. 24 h) at the participants’ residential address at baseline. Cox proportional hazard regression was usedto calculate hazard ratios (HR).

    Results: Of 1721 participants at baseline, 302 developed dementia during the follow up period. Exposure to noiselevels (Leq. 24 h)> 55 dB had no significant effect on dementia risk (HR 0.95; CI: 0.57, 1.57). Residing in thetwo highest quartiles of NOx exposure was associated with an increased risk of dementia. The risk associatedwith NOx was not modified by adjusting for noise. Moreover, we found no significant interaction effects betweenNOx and road traffic noise on dementia risk.

    Conclusion: We found no evidence that exposure to road traffic noise, either independently or in combinationwith traffic air pollution, was associated with risk of dementia in our study area. Our results suggest that pollutionshould be considered the main component in the association between traffic related exposures and dementia.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Oudin Åström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Pettersson-Strömbäck, Anita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Åström, Christofer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Med värme ihågkommen2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this project has been to use an interview study and literature survey to show how the outdoor environment, public facilities and housing can be designed to reduce the risk for elderly and persons with disabilities to die prematurely during heat waves. The goal is to raise awareness and interest in the adaptation of the environment and buildings of the persons responsible for planning, housing stock, social service, health care and homes for elderly.

    Cities are generally warmer and less windy than the surrounding landscape. The urban "warmer climate" is mainly due to the greater heat storage that can be found in buildings, streets, sidewalks, etc., limited vegetation that can shade and release moisture and activities such as traffic and domestic heating, which generate heat. During heat waves the increase in mortality is larger in cities. To live alone, be confined to bed and stay on the top floor has been shown to be additional risk factors.

    Measures to reduce the city's urban heat island and effects on humans are sometimes divided into "soft measures" (information, warning systems for heat waves, interventions for vulnerable groups), "green actions" (make the city a greener environment) and “technical measures” (shaded structures, changes of the walls, refrigeration /air conditioning indoors, etc.), which all are complementary. In some countries, the care homes for elderly should have a common room that can be kept cool even during heat waves.

    The aim of the interview study was to describe how personnel in the elderly care experience these problems in Sweden. The data collection method was 20 semi structured interviews with elderly care

    Sid 3 (49)

    personnel in Botkyrka municipality during October 2011. Content analysis was performed on the transcribed interview data and categories and subcategories were created on repeated themes in the text. The conclusions suggest intensified education for and information to personnel in the elderly care sector and that already in the planning of new homes for elderly the personnel's knowledge and experience of the needs among the elderly should be taken into account. 

  • 18. Andersson, M.
    et al.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Minarik, D.
    Mattsson, S.
    Leide-Svegborn, S.
    An internal radiation dosimetry computer program, IDAC 2.0, for estimation of patient doses from radiopharmaceuticals2014In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 162, no 3, p. 299-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The internal dosimetry computer program internal dose assessment by computer (IDAC) for calculations of absorbed doses to organs and tissues as well as effective doses to patients from examinations with radiopharmaceuticals has been developed. The new version, IDAC2.0, incorporates the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP)/ICRU computational adult male and female voxel phantoms and decay data from the ICRP publication 107. Instead of only 25 source and target regions, calculation can now be made with 63 source regions to 73 target regions. The major advantage of having the new phantom is that the calculations of the effective doses can be made with the latest tissue weighting factors of ICRP publication 103. IDAC2.0 uses the ICRP human alimentary tract (HAT) model for orally administrated activity and for excretion through the gastrointestinal tract and effective doses have been recalculated for radiopharmaceuticals that are orally administered. The results of the program are consistent with published data using the same specific absorption fractions and also compared with published data from the same computational phantoms but with segmentation of organs leading to another set of specific absorption fractions. The effective dose is recalculated for all the 34 radiopharmaceuticals that are administered orally and has been published by the ICRP. Using the new HAT model, new tissue weighting factors and the new adult computational voxel phantoms lead to an average effective dose of half of its earlier estimated value. The reduction mainly depends on electron transport simulations to walled organs and the transition from the stylised phantom with unrealistic interorgan distances to more realistic voxel phantoms.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden..
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Nordberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hagenbjörk, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Kåre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Early life swimming pool exposure and asthma onset in children: a case-control study2018In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 17, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Trichloramine exposure in indoor swimming pools has been suggested to cause asthma in children. We aimed to investigate the risk of asthma onset among children in relation to individual trichloramine exposure.

    METHODS: A longitudinal nested case-control study of 337 children with asthma (cases) and 633 controls aged 16-17 years was performed within a population-based cohort from The Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden studies (OLIN). Year of asthma onset and exposure time at different ages were obtained in telephone interviews. Trichloramine concentrations in the pool buildings were measured. Skin prick test results for inhalant allergens were available from previous examinations of the cohort. The risk for asthma was analyzed in relation to the cumulative trichloramine exposure before onset of asthma.

    RESULTS: Swimming pool exposure in early life was associated with a significantly higher risk of pre-school asthma onset. A dose-response relationship between swimming pool exposure and asthma was indicated in children with asthma onset at 1 year of age. Children who were both sensitized and exposed had a particularly high risk.

    CONCLUSIONS: Early life exposure to chlorinated swimming pool environments was associated with pre-school asthma onset.

  • 20. Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Eckerman, Keith
    Mattsson, Sören
    IDAC-Dose 2.1, an internal dosimetry program for diagnostic nuclear medicine based on the ICRP adult reference voxel phantoms2017In: EJNMMI Research, ISSN 2191-219X, E-ISSN 2191-219X, Vol. 7, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To date, the estimated radiation-absorbed dose to organs and tissues in patients undergoing diagnostic examinations in nuclear medicine is derived via calculations based on models of the human body and the biokinetic behaviour of the radiopharmaceutical. An internal dosimetry computer program, IDAC-Dose2.1, was developed based on the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-specific absorbed fractions and computational framework of internal dose assessment given for reference adults in ICRP Publication 133. The program uses the radionuclide decay database of ICRP Publication 107 and considers 83 different source regions irradiating 47 target tissues, defining the effective dose as presented in ICRP Publications 60 and 103. The computer program was validated against another ICRP dosimetry program, Dose and Risk Calculation (DCAL), that employs the same computational framework in evaluation of occupational and environmental intakes of radionuclides. IDAC-Dose2.1 has a sub-module for absorbed dose calculations in spherical structures of different volumes and composition; this sub-module is intended for absorbed dose estimates in radiopharmaceutical therapy. For nine specific alpha emitters, the absorbed dose contribution from their decay products is also included in the committed absorbed dose calculations. Results: The absorbed doses and effective dose of I-131-iodide determined by IDAC-Dose2.1 were validated against the dosimetry program DCAL, showing identical results. IDAC-Dose2.1 was used to calculate absorbed doses for intravenously administered F-18-FDG and orally administered Tc-99m-pertechnetate and I-131-iodide, three frequently used radiopharmaceuticals. Using the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103, the effective dose per administered activity was estimated to be 0.016 mSv/MBq for F-18-FDG, 0.014 mSv/MBq for Tc-99m-pertechnetate, and 16 mSv/MBq for I-131-iodide. Conclusions: The internal dosimetry program IDAC-Dose2.1 was developed and applied to three radiopharmaceuticals for validation against DCAL and to generate improved absorbed dose estimations for diagnostic nuclear medicine using specific absorbed fraction values of the ICRP computational voxel phantoms. The sub-module for absorbed dose calculations in spherical structures 1 mm to 9 cm in diameter and different tissue composition was included to broaden the clinical usefulness of the program. The IDAC-Dose2.1 program is free software for research and available for download at http://www.idac-dose.org.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Modig, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Heavy vehicle traffic is related to wheeze among schoolchildren: a population-based study in an area with low traffic flows2011In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 10, no 91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An association between traffic air pollution and respiratory symptoms among children has been reported. However, the effects of traffic air pollution on asthma and wheeze have been very sparsely studied in areas with low traffic intensity in cold climate with poor dispersion. We evaluated the impact of vehicle traffic on childhood asthma and wheeze by objective exposure assessment.

    Methods: As a part of the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies, a questionnaire was sent to the families of all children attending first or second grade in Luleå (72,000 inhabitants) in Northern Sweden in 2006. The age of the children was 7-8 years and the participation rate was 98% (n = 1357). Skin prick tests were performed in 1224 (89%) children. The home addresses were given geographical coordinates and traffic counts were obtained from the local traffic authorities. A proximity model of average daily traffic and average daily heavy vehicle traffic within 200 meters from each participant's home address was used. The associations between traffic exposure and asthma and wheeze, respectively, were analysed in an adjusted multiple logistic regression model.

    Results: Exposure to high traffic flows was uncommon in the study area; only 15% of the children lived within 200 meters from a road with a traffic flow of ≥8000 vehicles per day. Living closer than 200 meters from a road with ≥500 heavy vehicles daily was associated with current wheeze, odds ratio 1.7 (confidence interval 1.0-2.7). A dose-response relation was indicated. An increased risk of asthma was also seen, however not significant, odds ratio 1.5 (confidence interval 0.8-2.9). Stratified analyses revealed that the effect of traffic exposure was restricted to the non-sensitized phenotype of asthma and wheeze. The agreement between self-reported traffic exposure and objective measurements of exposure was moderate.

    Conclusions: This study showed that already at low levels of exposure, vehicle traffic is related to an increased risk of wheeze among children. Thus, the global burden of traffic air pollution may be underestimated.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Selin, F
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Järvholm, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Asbestos exposure and the risk of sinonasal cancer2016In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 326-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While the increased risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma is well established, the relationship between exposure to asbestos dust and sinonasal cancer is less clear.

    AIMS: To study the risk of sinonasal cancer in relation to asbestos dust exposure.

    METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of construction workers, linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Participants were classified into four exposure groups; heavy, medium, low or very low exposure to asbestos, according to the incidence of pleural mesothelioma in their occupational group. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and relative risks (RRs) were analysed, adjusted for age and smoking habits. The risks of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma were investigated separately.

    RESULTS: Among the 280222 subjects, there was no increased risk of sinonasal cancer compared to the general population [SIR 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68-1.03], or any dose-response relationship with exposure to asbestos. The highest RR was found in the low exposure group (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.69-2.28) and the lowest RR was found in the group with the highest exposure to asbestos (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.33-1.53). No significantly increased risk or dose-response association could be found for adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma when analysed separately.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study did not find an increased risk of developing sinonasal cancer after asbestos exposure.

  • 23.
    Andersson, N.
    et al.
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sandström, Monica
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Umeå, Sweden.
    Berglund, André
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hansson Mild, Kjell
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Umeå, Sweden.
    Amplitude modulation of light from various sources1994In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 157-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work was done to obtain basic knowledge about various light sources and specially about light modulation, or flicker. The study showed that the modulation of light varied a lot between different ordinary light sources. In general the 100 Hz component in the flickering light dominated. For incandescent lights the modulation increased with decreasing power and was in the range 10-22%. Light from the tungsten-halogen lamps had 2-6% modulation. The most common light sources (single-colour fluorescent light) had a modulation of about 20%. Fluorescent tubes with better colour rendering (full-colour fluorescent and full-colour special fluorescent tubes) had a higher modulation, 30-40%, while light from high-frequency (HF) fluorescent tubes had a modulation of 0.9%. Light from conventional compact fluorescent tubes had a modulation degree of about 44%, and for HF compact fluorescent tubes it was 2-7%. Modulation of light from HF compact fluorescent tubes had a tendency to decrease with increasing tube size. The modulation of light from discharge lamps was in the range of 52% up to 100% and the curve form of the light from low pressure sodium vapour lamp (100% modulation) contained several high frequency components.

  • 24.
    Andersson, T
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, Stockholm University, Sweden and Swedish Institute for National Food Agency (SLV), Sweden and Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden.
    Bjelkmar, P
    Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden, and Inera AB, Sweden.
    Hulth, A
    Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden.
    Lindh, J
    Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden and Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden.
    Stenmark, Stephan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases. County Medical Officer, Västerbotten, Sweden.
    Widerström, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Syndromic surveillance for local outbreak detection and awareness: evaluating outbreak signals of acute gastroenteritis in telephone triage, web-based queries and over-the-counter pharmacy sales2014In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, no 2, p. 303-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the purpose of developing a national system for outbreak surveillance, local outbreak signals were compared in three sources of syndromic data - telephone triage of acute gastroenteritis, web queries about symptoms of gastrointestinal illness, and over-the-counter (OTC) pharmacy sales of antidiarrhoeal medication. The data sources were compared against nine known waterborne and foodborne outbreaks in Sweden in 2007-2011. Outbreak signals were identified for the four largest outbreaks in the telephone triage data and the two largest outbreaks in the data on OTC sales of antidiarrhoeal medication. No signals could be identified in the data on web queries. The signal magnitude for the fourth largest outbreak indicated a tenfold larger outbreak than officially reported, supporting the use of telephone triage data for situational awareness. For the two largest outbreaks, telephone triage data on adult diarrhoea provided outbreak signals at an early stage, weeks and months in advance, respectively, potentially serving the purpose of early event detection. In conclusion, telephone triage data provided the most promising source for surveillance of point-source outbreaks.

  • 25.
    Anticona, Cynthia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundh, Thomas
    Alegre, Yuri
    Sebastian, Miguel San
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lead exposure in indigenous communities of the Amazon basin, Peru2011In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 215, no 1, p. 59-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2006, three studies have reported elevated levels of lead (Pb) among the indigenous population of the Corrientes river, in the Amazon basin of Peru. Due to the large evidence of environmental pollution related to oil exploitation in the area, this activity has been suggested as the source of exposure. This study aimed to evaluate Pb levels in the population and environment of two communities exposed and one community non-exposed to the oil exploitation activity. Blood lead levels (BLL) were determined by the instrument Leadcare. A comparison with the graphite furnace atomic absorption technique was performed in order to validate the Leadcare results. Environmental samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Among 361 capillary samples, the mean BLL was 9.4μg/dl. Mean BLL of the communities exposed (n=171, x¯=9.5μg/dl) and non-exposed (n=190, x¯=9.2μg/dl) to the oil activity were not significantly different. Pb levels in environmental samples were below the maximum permissible levels. The sources of exposure could not be identified. Elevated levels of Pb in the oil-non-exposed community pointed out at other sources not yet clarified.

  • 26.
    Anticona, Cynthia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Anemia and malnutrition in indigenous children and adolescents of the Peruvian Amazon in a context of lead exposure: a cross-sectional study2014In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Indigenous children and adolescents of the Peruvian Amazon live in precarious conditions that could increase the risk of malnutrition. A particular problem in the Corrientes river communities is the high exposure to lead among children and adolescents. Objective: This study aimed to determine the nutritional status of children and adolescents in indigenous communities in the Corrientes river basin and examine risk factors for anemia, stunting, underweight, and wasting. Design: This was a cross-sectional assessment in children and adolescents aged 0-17 years from six communities (n = 330). Data collection included measurement of hemoglobin levels, anthropometrics, blood lead levels (BLLs); a parental questionnaire including demographic and dwelling information; parents' occupation; and the child's duration of breastfeeding and food consumption. Analysis included univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression. Results: Overall, anemia prevalence was 51.0%, stunting (proxy for chronic malnutrition) 50.0%, and underweight 20.0%. Bivariate analysis showed that anemia and underweight prevalence was higher in the 0-4 years group (p<0.05). No association was found between anemia, stunting, or underweight with gender, community exposure to oil activity, or consumption of river water. Stunting prevalence was higher in the group whose BLLs were >5 mu g/dL (p<0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, no variable was associated with anemia or underweight. The group 5-11 years and >12 years had 1.9 and 3.1 times higher risk of stunting than the group under five years, respectively. Children and adolescents with BLLs >5 mu g/dL had twice the risk of stunting compared to those with lower BLLs. Conclusions: Half of the study population was found with anemia and stunting. Anemia was more prevalent in the 0- to 5-year age group and stunting in the 12- to 17-year group. The association between stunting and BLLs might be attributed to a direct effect of lead on human growth. Also, poor nutrition and other socioeconomic-related factors may contribute to the simultaneous existence of stunting and elevated BLLs.

  • 27. Aronsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Theorell, Tores
    Grape, Tom
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hogstedt, Christer
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Skoog, Ingmar
    Traskman-Bendz, Lil
    Hall, Charlotte
    A systematic review including meta-analysis of work environment and burnout symptoms2017In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 264Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Practitioners and decision makers in the medical and insurance systems need knowledge on the relationship between work exposures and burnout. Many burnout studies – original as well as reviews - restricted their analyses to emotional exhaustion or did not report results on cynicism, personal accomplishment or global burnout. To meet this need we carried out this review and meta-analyses with the aim to provide systematically graded evidence for associations between working conditions and near-future development of burnout symptoms.

    Methods: A wide range of work exposure factors was screened. Inclusion criteria were: 1) Study performed in Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand 1990–2013. 2) Prospective or comparable case control design. 3) Assessments of exposure (work) and outcome at baseline and at least once again during follow up 1–5 years later. Twenty-five articles met the predefined relevance and quality criteria. The GRADE-system with its 4-grade evidence scale was used.

    Results: Most of the 25 studies focused emotional exhaustion, fewer cynicism and still fewer personal accomplishment. Moderately strong evidence (grade 3) was concluded for the association between job control and reduced emotional exhaustion and between low workplace support and increased emotional exhaustion. Limited evidence (grade 2) was found for the associations between workplace justice, demands, high work load, low reward, low supervisor support, low co-worker support, job insecurity and change in emotional exhaustion. Cynicism was associated with most of these work factors. Reduced personal accomplishment was only associated with low reward. There were few prospective studies with sufficient quality on adverse chemical, biological and physical factors and burnout.

    Conclusion: While high levels of job support and workplace justice were protective for emotional exhaustion, high demands, low job control, high work load, low reward and job insecurity increased the risk for developing exhaustion. Our approach with a wide range of work exposure factors analysed in relation to the separate dimensions of burnout expanded the knowledge of associations, evidence as well as research needs. The potential of organizational interventions is illustrated by the findings that burnout symptoms are strongly influenced by structural factors such as job demands, support and the possibility to exert control.

  • 28.
    Aström, Daniel Oudin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Ageing & Living Condit Programme, Umeå University.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Acute Fatal Effects of Short-Lasting Extreme Temperatures in Stockholm, Sweden: Evidence Across a Century of Change.2013In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 820-829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events. Short-term effects of extreme hot and cold weather and their effects on mortality have been thoroughly documented, as have epidemiologic and demographic changes throughout the 20th century. We investigated whether sensitivity to episodes of extreme heat and cold has changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until the present.

    METHODS: We collected daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901-2009 for present-day Stockholm County, Sweden. Heat extremes were defined as days for which the 2-day moving average of mean temperature was above the 98th percentile; cold extremes were defined as days for which the 26-day moving average was below the 2nd percentile. The relationship between extreme hot/cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, stratified by decade, sex, and age, was investigated through time series modeling, adjusting for time trends.

    RESULTS: Total daily mortality was higher during heat extremes in all decades, with a declining trend over time in the relative risk associated with heat extremes, leveling off during the last three decades. The relative risk of mortality was higher during cold extremes for the entire period, with a more dispersed pattern across decades. Unlike for heat extremes, there was no decline in the mortality with cold extremes over time.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although the relative risk of mortality during extreme temperature events appears to have fallen, such events still pose a threat to public health.

  • 29. Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Eriksson, Jonas
    Hagstad, Stig
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Research and Development, Obstructive Lung Disease In Northern Sweden (OLIN) Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Lötvall, Jan
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Chronic bronchitis in West Sweden - a matter of smoking and social class2016In: European clinical respiratory journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 3, article id 30319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although chronic bronchitis is associated with impaired quality of life, hospitalisations and increased mortality, it has been less in focus after the introduction of the term chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There are no recent published data on the prevalence of chronic bronchitis from the Scandinavian countries.

    AIM: The main aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of chronic bronchitis in West Sweden by using data from a large-scale epidemiological study of the general population. A further aim was to identify current risk factors for chronic bronchitis in a population with a major decrease in the proportion of smokers.

    METHODS: From the 18,087 questionnaire responders out of 30,000 invited to participate at the West Sweden Asthma Study, 2,000 subjects were randomly selected and invited to detailed clinical examinations performed during 2009-2013. A total of 1,172 subjects aged 17-79 participated in the examinations which included, among others, spirometry and structured interviews. Chronic bronchitis was defined according to reported symptoms.

    RESULTS: The overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 7.2% (men 7.6%; women 6.8% ns), and it was 8.7% in subjects older than age 60. Chronic bronchitis was strongly associated with smoking, defined both as current smoking status and pack-years. Other risk factors were increasing age, low socio-economic class and urban living. Of those with chronic bronchitis, 22% fulfilled the GOLD criteria of COPD.

    CONCLUSION: The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was somewhat lower than found by studies in Sweden in the 1980s and the prevalence was now similar in men and women. Although smoking was still the dominating risk factor for chronic bronchitis, the relative importance of smoking had decreased parallel with a decreasing smoking prevalence, while the relative importance of other factors than smoking had increased compared to previous studies.

  • 30. Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Kainu, Annette
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Respiratory symptoms increase health care consumption and affect everyday life: a cross-sectional population-based study from Finland, Estonia, and Sweden2016In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 3, article id 31024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Even though respiratory symptoms are common in the adult population, there is limited research describing their impact on everyday life and association with health care consumption.

    AIM: The main objective of this population-based study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among adults in Finland, Estonia, and Sweden in relation to health care consumption and to identify factors influencing health care consumption. A secondary aim was to assess to which extent the presence of respiratory symptoms affect everyday life.

    METHOD: In the population-based FinEsS studies consisting of random samples of subjects aged 20 to 69 years from Finland (n=1,337), Estonia (n=1,346), and Sweden (n=1,953), data on demographics, respiratory health, and health care consumption were collected by structured interviews. Prevalence was compared and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed.

    RESULTS: Respiratory symptoms were significantly more common in Finland (66.0%) and Estonia (65.2%) than in Sweden (54.1%). Among subjects with respiratory symptoms, the proportion reporting outpatient care during the past year was fairly similar in the three countries, while specialist consultations were more common in Finland (19.1%), and hospitalisations more common in Estonia (15.0%). Finnish and Estonian residency, female sex, and BMI>25 increased the risk for outpatient care consumption. Wheeze and attacks of shortness of breath in the past 12 months, recurrent sputum production, and cough were associated with an increased risk for health care consumption. Increasing number of respiratory symptoms increased the risk for consuming health care. A larger proportion of subjects in Estonia and Sweden experienced their everyday life being affected by respiratory symptoms compared with subjects in Finland.

    CONCLUSION: Respiratory symptoms are common in Finland, Estonia, and Sweden and contribute to a negative impact on everyday life as well as increased health care consumption. The observed differences in health care consumption between countries are probably related to national differences in health care structure.

  • 31. Ayres, JG
    et al.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Annesi-Maesano, I
    Dey, R
    Ebi, KL
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Helms, PJ
    Medina-Ramón, M
    Windt, M
    Forastiere, F
    Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement2009In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement.

  • 32.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lung function and prevalence trends in asthma and COPD: the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden Thesis XVI2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common obstructive airway diseases with a substantial burden in terms of morbidity, mortality and costs. Smoking is the single most important risk factor for COPD, and is associated with incident asthma. It is important to know if the prevalence of asthma and COPD is increasing or decreasing in the population in order to effectively allocate health care resources. The definitions of these diseases have varied over time which makes it difficult to measure changes in prevalence. The preferred method is to estimate the prevalence with the same procedures and definitions based on cross-sectional population samples with identical age distributions in the same geographical area at different time points. Measurements of lung function (spirometry) are required to diagnose COPD, and spirometry is used to evaluate disease severity and progress of both asthma and COPD, where observed values are compared to reference values. The most commonly used reference values in Sweden are published during the mid 1980s, and there are few evaluations of how appropriate they are today based on Swedish population samples. The aim of the thesis was to estimate trends in the prevalence of asthma and COPD in relation to smoking habits, and to evaluate and estimate reference values for spirometry.

    Methods

    The project was based on population-based samples of adults from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies. Postal questionnaires were sent to large cohorts, recruited in 1992 (n=4851, 20-69 years), 1996 (n=7420, 20-74 years) and 2006 (n=6165, 20-69 years), respectively. The questionnaire included questions on respiratory symptoms and diseases, their comorbidities and several possible risk factors including smoking habits. Structured interviews and spirometry were performed in random samples of the responders to the 1992 and 2006 surveys, of which n=660 (in 1994) and n=623 (in 2009) were within identical age-spans (23-72 years). The trend in asthma prevalence was estimated by comparing the postal questionnaire surveys in 1996 and 2006, and the trend in COPD prevalence was estimated by comparing the samples participating in dynamic spirometry in 1994 and 2009, respectively. The prevalence of COPD was estimated based on two different definitions of COPD. Commonly used reference values for spirometry were evaluated based on randomly sampled healthy non-smokers defined in clinical examinations of participants in the 2006 postal questionnaire (n=501). The main focus of the evaluation was the global lung function initiative (GLI) reference values published in 2012, for which Z-scores and percent of predicted values were analysed. New sex-specific reference values for spirometry were estimated by linear regression, with age and height as predictors. These new OLIN reference values were also evaluated on a sample of healthy non-smokers identified in the population-based West Sweden Asthma Study.

    Results

    Although the prevalence of smoking decreased from 27.4% to 19.1%, p<0.001, between 1996 and 2006, the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma increased from 9.4% to 11.6%, p<0.001. The prevalence of symptoms common in asthma such as recurrent wheeze did not change significantly between the surveys or tended to decrease, while bronchitis symptoms such as cough and sputum production decreased significantly. The evaluation of the GLI reference values showed that the predicted values were significantly lower compared to the observed values in Norrbotten, which makes the percent of predicted too high. This was especially true for FVC percent predicted with a mean of 106%. In general, the deviations were more pronounced among women. New OLIN reference values valid for the Norrbotten sample were modelled and showed a high external validity when applied on the sample from western Sweden. The prevalence of moderate to severe COPD decreased substantially over the 15-year period between 1994 and 2009, regardless of definition.

    Conclusions

    In parallel with substantially decreased smoking habits in the population between 1996 and 2006, the prevalence of several airway symptoms decreased while the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma increased. These results suggest increased diagnostic activity for asthma, but may also suggest that the asthma prevalence has continued to increase. In contrast to asthma, the prevalence of COPD tended to decrease and moderate to severe COPD decreased substantially. The continuous decrease in smoking in Sweden during several decades prior to the study period is most likely contributing to these results. The evaluation of reference values showed that the GLI reference values were lower than the observed spirometric values in the population, especially for women, why the new up-to date reference values may be of importance for disease evaluation in epidemiology and in the health care as well.

  • 33.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eriksson, Berne
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sovijärvi, Anssi
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Restrictive spirometric pattern in the general adult population: methods of defining the condition and consequences on prevalence2016In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 120, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Attempts have been made to use dynamic spirometry to define restrictive lung function, but the definition of a restrictive spirometric pattern (RSP) varies between studies such as BOLD and NHANES. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of RSP among adults in northern Sweden based on different definitions.

    METHODS: In 2008-2009 a general population sample aged 21-86y within the obstructive lung disease in northern Sweden (OLIN) studies was examined by structured interview and spirometry, and 726 subjects participated (71% of invited). The prevalence of RSP was calculated according to three different definitions based on pre-as well as post-bronchodilator spirometry: 1) FVC < 80% & FEV1/FVC > 0.7 2) FVC < 80% & FEV1/FVC > LLN 3) FVC < LLN & FEV1/FVC > LLN RESULTS: The three definitions yielded RSP prevalence estimates of 10.5%, 11.2% and 9.4% respectively, when based on pre-bronchodilator values. The prevalence was lower when based on post-bronchodilator values, i.e. 7.3%, 7.9% and 6.6%. According to definition 1 and 2, the RSP prevalence increased by age, but not according to definition 3. The overlap between the definitions was substantial. When corrected for confounding factors, manual work in industry and diabetes with obesity were independently associated with an increased risk for RSP regardless of definition.

    CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of RSP was 7-11%. The prevalence estimates differed more depending on the choice of pre- compared to post-bronchodilator values than on the choice of RSP definition. RSP was, regardless of definition, independently associated with manual work in industry and diabetes with obesity.

  • 34.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Berne
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Dept of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden..
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ;Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Decreased prevalence of moderate to severe COPD over 15 years in northern Sweden2016In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 114, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The burden of COPD in terms of mortality, morbidity, costs and prevalence has increased worldwide. Recent results on prevalence in Western Europe are conflicting. In Sweden smoking prevalence has steadily decreased over the past 30 years.

    AIM: The aim was to study changes in prevalence and risk factor patterns of COPD in the same area and within the same age-span 15 years apart.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two population-based cross-sectional samples in ages 23-72 years participating at examinations in 1994 and 2009, respectively, were compared in terms of COPD prevalence, severity and risk factor patterns. Two different definitions of COPD were used; FEV1/FVC < LLN and FEV1/FVC < 0.7. The severity of COPD was assessed by FEV1, both as % of predicted and in relation to the LLN.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of COPD decreased significantly from 9.5% to 6.3% (p = 0.030) according to the FEV1/FVC < LLN criterion, while the decrease based on the FEV1/FVC < 0.7 criterion from 10.5% to 8.5% was non-significant. The prevalence of moderate to severe COPD decreased substantially and significantly, and the risk factor pattern was altered in 2009 when, beside age and smoking, also socio-economic status based on occupation was significantly associated with COPD.

    CONCLUSIONS: Changes in both prevalence and risk factor patterns of COPD were observed between surveys. Following a continuing decrease in smoking habits over several decades, a decrease in the prevalence of moderate to severe COPD was observed from 1994 to 2009 in northern Sweden.

  • 35.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eriksson, Berne
    Halmstad, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Luleå, Sweden.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Decreased prevalence of moderate to severe COPD over 15 years in northern SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The burden of COPD in terms of mortality, morbidity, costs and prevalence has increased worldwide. Recent results on prevalence in Western Europe are conflicting. In Sweden smoking prevalence has steadily decreased over the past 30 years. 

    Aim: The aim was to study changes in prevalence and risk factor patterns of COPD in the same area and within the same age-span 15 years apart.

    Material and methods: Two population-based cross-sectional samples in ages 23-72 years participating at examinations in 1994 and 2009, respectively, were compared in terms of COPD prevalence, severity and risk factor patterns. Two different definitions of COPD were used; FEV1/FVC<LLN and FEV1/FVC<0.7. The severity of COPD was assessed by FEV1, both as % of predicted and in relation to the LLN.

    Results: The prevalence of COPD decreased significantly from 9.5% to 6.3% (p=0.030) according to the FEV1/FVC<LLN criterion, while the decrease based on the FEV1/FVC<0.7 criterion from 10.5% to 8.5% was non-significant. The prevalence of moderate to severe COPD decreased substantially and significantly, and the risk factor pattern was altered in 2009 when, beside age and smoking, also socio-economic status based on occupation was significantly associated with COPD. 

    Conclusions: Changes in both prevalence and risk factor patterns of COPD were observed between surveys. Following a continuing decrease in smoking habits over several decades, a decrease in the prevalence of moderate to severe COPD was observed from 1994 to 2009 in northern Sweden.

  • 36.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Oden, Anders
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Hedman, Linnéa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Kainu, Annette
    Sovijärvi, Anssi
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Reference values for spirometry - report from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden studies2015In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 2, article id 26375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Abnormal lung function is commonly identified by comparing observed spirometric values to corresponding reference values. It is recommended that such reference values for spirometry are evaluated and updated frequently. The aim of this study was to estimate new reference values for Swedish adults by fitting a multivariable regression model to a healthy non-smoking general population sample from northern Sweden. Further aims were to evaluate the external validity of the obtained reference values on a contemporary sample from south-western Sweden, and to compare them to the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) reference values.

    Method: Sex-specific multivariable linear regression models were fitted to the spirometric data of n=501 healthy non-smoking adults aged 22–91 years, with age and height as predictors. The models were extended to allow the scatter around the outcome variable to depend on age, and age-dependent spline functions were incorporated into the models to provide a smooth fit over the entire age range. Mean values and lower limits of normal, defined as the lower 5th percentiles, were derived.

    Result: This modelling approach resulted in unbiased estimates of the spirometric outcomes, and the obtained estimates were appropriate not only for the northern Sweden sample but also for the south-western Sweden sample. On average, the GLI reference values for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and, in particular, forced expiratory vital capacity (FVC) were lower than both the observed values and the new reference values, but higher for the FEV1/FVC ratio.

    Conclusion: The evaluation based on the sample of healthy non-smokers from northern Sweden show that the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden reference values are valid. Furthermore, the evaluation based on the south-western Sweden sample indicates a high external validity. The comparison with GLI brought further evidence to the consensus that, when available, appropriate local population-specific reference values may be preferred.

  • 37.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Räisänen, Petri
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Increased prevalence of allergic asthma from 1996 to 2006 and further to 2016: results from three population surveys2017In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1426-1435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the latter half of the 20th century, the prevalence of asthma and many other allergic diseases has increased. Information on asthma prevalence trends among adults after 2010, especially regarding studies separating allergic asthma from non-allergic asthma, is lacking.

    Objective: The aim was to estimate prevalence trends of current asthma among adults, both allergic and non-allergic, from 1996 to 2016.

    Methods: Three cross-sectional samples from the same area of Sweden, 20-69 years, participated in surveys with the same questionnaire in 1996 (n=7104 participants, 85% response rate), 2006 (n=6165, 77%) and 2016 (n=5466, 53%), respectively. Allergic rhino-conjunctivitis (ARC) was used as a marker for allergic sensitization to define allergic asthma.

    Results: The prevalence of current asthma increased from 8.4% (95% CI: 7.8-9.0) in 1996 to 9.9% (95% CI: 9.2-10.6) in 2006 and 10.9% (95% CI: 10.1-11.7) in 2016 (P<.001). Allergic asthma increased from 5.0% (95% CI: 4.5-5.5) in 1996 to 6.0% (95% CI: 5.4-6.6) in 2006 and further to 7.3% (95% CI: 6.6-8.0) in 2016 (P<.001), while the prevalence of non-allergic asthma remained stable around 3.4%-3.8%. The increase in current asthma was most pronounced among women and among the middle-aged. Physician-diagnosed asthma, asthma medication use and ARC also increased significantly, while the prevalence of symptoms common in asthma such as wheeze and attacks of shortness of breath decreased slightly or was stable. The prevalence of current smoking decreased from 27.4% in 1996 to 12.3% in 2016.

    Conclusions and clinical relevance: The prevalence of allergic asthma increased from 1996 to 2006 and further to 2016, while the prevalence of non-allergic asthma remained on a stable prevalence level. The prevalence of symptoms common in asthma decreased slightly or was stable despite a substantial decrease in the prevalence of current smoking. Clinicians should be aware that the previously observed increase in prevalence of allergic asthma is still ongoing.

  • 38.
    Backteman-Erlanson, Susann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Prevalence of burnout and associations with psychosocial work environment, physical strain, and stress of conscience among Swedish female and male police personnel2012In: Police Practice & Research, ISSN 1561-4263, E-ISSN 1477-271XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focus of this study was to investigate prevalence of burnout and relation to psychosocial work environment, physical strain, and stress of conscience amongst female and male police personnel in Sweden. The questionnaire was answered by 856 (55%) patrolling police officers, 437 (56%) women vs. 419 (53%) men. Prevalence and mean values for emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP) was higher in our study compared to other studies including police personnel in Norway and the Netherlands. A multiple logistic regressions showed that for women stress of conscience, high demand, and organizational climate was significant associated with EE, for men it was stress of conscience, decision, and high demand. For DP only stress of conscience contributed statistically significant in our model, respectively, of gender. Further research is needed to develop interventions aiming to reduce levels of burnout among police personnel in Sweden.

  • 39. Baltar, Valéria Troncoso
    et al.
    Xun, Wei W
    Johansson, Mattias
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Chuang, Shu-Chun
    Relton, Caroline
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Midttun, Oivind
    Slimani, Nadia
    Jenab, Mazda
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Boeing, Heiner
    Weikert, Cornelia
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Boshuizen, Hendriek
    van Gils, Carla H
    Onland-Moret, N Charlotte
    Agudo, Antonio
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Navarro, Carmen
    Rodríguez, Laudina
    Castaño, José Maria Huerta
    Larrañaga, Nerea
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Allen, Naomi E
    Crowe, Francesca
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Masala, Giovanna
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Tumino, Rosario
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Rasmuson, Torgny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Roswall, Nina
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Riboli, Elio
    Brennan, Paul
    Vineis, Paolo
    A structural equation modelling approach to explore the role of B vitamins and immune markers in lung cancer risk2013In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 677-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The one-carbon metabolism (OCM) is considered key in maintaining DNA integrity and regulating gene expression, and may be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. Several B-vitamins and amino acids have been implicated in lung cancer risk, via the OCM directly as well as immune system activation. However it is unclear whether these factors act independently or through complex mechanisms. The current study applies structural equations modelling (SEM) to further disentangle the mechanisms involved in lung carcinogenesis. SEM allows simultaneous estimation of linear relations where a variable can be the outcome in one equation and the predictor in another, as well as allowing estimation using latent variables (factors estimated by correlation matrix). A large number of biomarkers have been analysed from 891 lung cancer cases and 1,747 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Four putative mechanisms in the OCM and immunity were investigated in relation to lung cancer risk: methionine-homocysteine metabolism, folate cycle, transsulfuration, and mechanisms involved in inflammation and immune activation, all adjusted for tobacco exposure. The hypothesized SEM model confirmed a direct and protective effect for factors representing methionine-homocysteine metabolism (p = 0.020) and immune activation (p = 0.021), and an indirect protective effect of folate cycle (p = 0.019), after adjustment for tobacco smoking. In conclusion, our results show that in the investigation of the involvement of the OCM, the folate cycle and immune system in lung carcinogenesis, it is important to consider complex pathways (by applying SEM) rather than the effects of single vitamins or nutrients (e.g. using traditional multiple regression). In our study SEM were able to suggest a greater role of the methionine-homocysteine metabolism and immune activation over other potential mechanisms.

  • 40.
    Barath, Stefan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Mills, Nicholas L.
    Ädelroth, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Olin, Anna-Carin
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Diesel exhaust but not ozone increases fraction of exhaled nitric oxide in a randomized controlled experimental exposure study of healthy human subjects2013In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 12, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is a promising non-invasive index of airway inflammation that may be used to assess respiratory effects of air pollution. We evaluated FENO as a measure of airway inflammation after controlled exposure to diesel exhaust or ozone. Methods: Healthy volunteers were exposed to either diesel exhaust (particle concentration 300 mu g/m(3)) and filtered air for one hour, or ozone (300 ppb) and filtered air for 75 minutes. FENO was measured in duplicate at expiratory flow rates of 10, 50, 100 and 270 mL/s before, 6 and 24 hours after each exposure. Results: Exposure to diesel exhaust increased FENO at 6 hours compared with air at expiratory flow rates of 10 mL/s (p = 0.01) and at 50 mL/s (p = 0.011), but FENO did not differ significantly at higher flow rates. Increases in FENO following diesel exhaust were attenuated at 24 hours. Ozone did not affect FENO at any flow rate or time point. Conclusions: Exposure to diesel exhaust, but not ozone, increased FENO concentrations in healthy subjects. Differences in the induction of airway inflammation may explain divergent responses to diesel exhaust and ozone, with implications for the use of FENO as an index of exposure to air pollution.

  • 41. Barnett, A. G.
    et al.
    Åström, Christofer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Commentary: What measure of temperature is the best predictor of mortality?2012In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 118, p. 149-151Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42. Baste, Valborg
    et al.
    Moen, Bente E
    Oftedal, Gunnhild
    Strand, Leif Age
    Bjørge, Line
    Hansson Mild, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Pregnancy outcomes after paternal radiofrequency field exposure aboard fast patrol boats2012In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 431-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate adverse reproductive outcomes among male employees in the Royal Norwegian Navy exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields aboard fast patrol boats.

    Methods: Cohort study of Royal Norwegian Navy servicemen linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, including singleton offspring born between 1967 and 2008 (n = 37,920). Exposure during the last 3 months before conception (acute) and exposure more than 3 months before conception (nonacute) were analyzed.

    Results: Perinatal mortality and preeclampsia increased after service aboard fast patrol boats during an acute period and also after increased estimated radiofrequency exposure during an acute period, compared with service aboard other vessels. No associations were found between nonacute exposure and any of the reproductive outcomes.

    Conclusions: Paternal work aboard fast patrol boats during an acute period was associated with perinatal mortality and preeclampsia, but the cause is not clear.

  • 43. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Hoek, Gerard
    Vienneau, Danielle
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Pedeli, Xanthi
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Künzli, Nino
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Eriksen, Kirsten
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Stephanou, Euripides
    Evridiki, Patelarou
    Lanki, Timo
    Yli-Tuomi, Tarja
    Declercq, Christophe
    Falq, Grégoire
    Stempfelet, Morgane
    Birk, Matthias
    Cyrys, Josef
    von Klot, Stephanie
    Nádor, Gizella
    Varró, Mihály János
    Dėdelė, Audrius
    Gražulevičienė, Regina
    Mölter, Anna
    Lindley, Sarah
    Madsen, Christian
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Nonnemacher, Michael
    Krämer, Ursula
    Kuhlbusch, Thomas
    Cirach, Marta
    de Nazelle, Audrey
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Bellander, Tom
    Korek, Michal
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Dons, Evi
    Jerrett, Michael
    Fischer, Paul
    Brunekreef, Bert
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Development of NO2 and NOx land use regression models for estimating air pollution exposure in 36 study areas in Europe: the ESCAPE project2013In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 72, p. 10-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimating within-city variability in air pollution concentrations is important. Land use regression (LUR) models are able to explain such small-scale within-city variations. Transparency in LUR model development methods is important to facilitate comparison of methods between different studies. We therefore developed LUR models in a standardized way in 36 study areas in Europe for the ESCAPE (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects) project.

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) were measured with Ogawa passive samplers at 40 or 80 sites in each of the 36 study areas. The spatial variation in each area was explained by LUR modeling. Centrally and locally available Geographic Information System (GIS) variables were used as potential predictors. A leave-one out cross-validation procedure was used to evaluate the model performance.

    There was substantial contrast in annual average NO2 and NOx concentrations within the study areas. The model explained variances (R2) of the LUR models ranged from 55% to 92% (median 82%) for NO2 and from 49% to 91% (median 78%) for NOx. For most areas the cross-validation R2 was less than 10% lower than the model R2. Small-scale traffic and population/household density were the most common predictors. The magnitude of the explained variance depended on the contrast in measured concentrations as well as availability of GIS predictors, especially traffic intensity data were important. In an additional evaluation, models in which local traffic intensity was not offered had 10% lower R2 compared to models in the same areas in which these variables were offered.

    Within the ESCAPE project it was possible to develop LUR models that explained a large fraction of the spatial variance in measured annual average NO2 and NOx concentrations. These LUR models are being used to estimate outdoor concentrations at the home addresses of participants in over 30 cohort studies.

  • 44. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Fischer, Paul
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Vineis, Paolo
    Xun, Wei W
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Modig, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Havulinna, Aki S
    Lanki, Timo
    Turunen, Anu
    Oftedal, Bente
    Nystad, Wenche
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Ostenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pershagen, Göran
    Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup
    Overvad, Kim
    Ellermann, Thomas
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Peeters, Petra H
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Krämer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Hampel, Regina
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ineichen, Alex
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Künzli, Nino
    Schindler, Christian
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Adam, Martin
    Phuleria, Harish
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Declercq, Christophe
    Grioni, Sara
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Tamayo, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on natural-cause mortality: an analysis of 22 European cohorts within the multicentre ESCAPE project2014In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 383, no 9919, p. 785-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few studies on long-term exposure to air pollution and mortality have been reported from Europe. Within the multicentre European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we aimed to investigate the association between natural-cause mortality and long-term exposure to several air pollutants.

    METHODS: We used data from 22 European cohort studies, which created a total study population of 367 251 participants. All cohorts were general population samples, although some were restricted to one sex only. With a strictly standardised protocol, we assessed residential exposure to air pollutants as annual average concentrations of particulate matter (PM) with diameters of less than 2·5 μm (PM2·5), less than 10 μm (PM10), and between 10 μm and 2·5 μm (PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, and annual average concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), with land use regression models. We also investigated two traffic intensity variables-traffic intensity on the nearest road (vehicles per day) and total traffic load on all major roads within a 100 m buffer. We did cohort-specific statistical analyses using confounder models with increasing adjustment for confounder variables, and Cox proportional hazards models with a common protocol. We obtained pooled effect estimates through a random-effects meta-analysis.

    FINDINGS: The total study population consisted of 367 251 participants who contributed 5 118 039 person-years at risk (average follow-up 13·9 years), of whom 29 076 died from a natural cause during follow-up. A significantly increased hazard ratio (HR) for PM2·5 of 1·07 (95% CI 1·02-1·13) per 5 μg/m(3) was recorded. No heterogeneity was noted between individual cohort effect estimates (I(2) p value=0·95). HRs for PM2·5 remained significantly raised even when we included only participants exposed to pollutant concentrations lower than the European annual mean limit value of 25 μg/m(3) (HR 1·06, 95% CI 1·00-1·12) or below 20 μg/m(3) (1·07, 1·01-1·13).

    INTERPRETATION: Long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution was associated with natural-cause mortality, even within concentration ranges well below the present European annual mean limit value.

    FUNDING: European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2011).

  • 45. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Xun, Wei W
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Houthuijs, Danny
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Lanki, Timo
    Yli-Tuomi, Tarja
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aamodt, Geir
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pyko, Andrei
    Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Becker, Thomas
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Bots, Michiel
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Krämer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Cyrys, Josef
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ineichen, Alex
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Dratva, Julia
    Ducret-Stich, Regina
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Stempfelet, Morgane
    Grioni, Sara
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Tamayo, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Vineis, Paolo
    Hoek, Gerard
    Long-term exposure to air pollution and cardiovascular mortality: an analysis of 22 European cohorts2014In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Air pollution has been associated with cardiovascular mortality, but it remains unclear as to whether specific pollutants are related to specific cardiovascular causes of death. Within the multicenter European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we investigated the associations of long-term exposure to several air pollutants with all cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, as well as with specific cardiovascular causes of death.

    METHODS: Data from 22 European cohort studies were used. Using a standardized protocol, study area-specific air pollution exposure at the residential address was characterized as annual average concentrations of the following: nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx); particles with diameters of less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), less than 10 μm (PM10), and 10 μm to 2.5 μm (PMcoarse); PM2.5 absorbance estimated by land-use regression models; and traffic indicators. We applied cohort-specific Cox proportional hazards models using a standardized protocol. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to obtain pooled effect estimates.

    RESULTS: The total study population consisted of 367,383 participants, with 9994 deaths from CVD (including 4,992 from ischemic heart disease, 2264 from myocardial infarction, and 2484 from cerebrovascular disease). All hazard ratios were approximately 1.0, except for particle mass and cerebrovascular disease mortality; for PM2.5, the hazard ratio was 1.21 (95% confidence interval = 0.87-1.69) per 5 μg/m and for PM10, 1.22 (0.91-1.63) per 10 μg/m.

    CONCLUSION: In a joint analysis of data from 22 European cohorts, most hazard ratios for the association of air pollutants with mortality from overall CVD and with specific CVDs were approximately 1.0, with the exception of particulate mass and cerebrovascular disease mortality for which there was suggestive evidence for an association.

  • 46. Bengtsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Jonsson, Lars
    Holmström, Mats
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    Hedner, Jan
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Janson, Christer
    Chronic rhinosinusitis impairs sleep quality: results of the GA(2)LEN study2017In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 40, no 1, article id zsw021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To analyse the prevalence of sleep problems in subjects with CRS and to determine whether the disease severity of CRS affects sleep quality.

    METHODS: Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. Questions on CRS, asthma, allergic rhinitis, co-morbidities, tobacco use, educational level and physical activity were included. CRS was defined according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EPOS) epidemiological criteria. The disease severity of CRS was defined by the number of reported CRS symptoms. Sleep quality was assessed using the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Of the 26 647 subjects, 2249 (8.4%) had CRS. Reported sleep problems were 50-90% more common among subjects with CRS compared with those without or the total population. The prevalence of reported sleep problems increased in conjunction with the severity of CRS. After adjusting for gender, BMI, age, tobacco use, asthma, somatic diseases, physical activity level and educational level, participants with four symptoms of CRS (compared with subjects without CRS symptoms) displayed a higher risk of snoring (adj. OR (95% CI): 3.13 (2.22-4.41)), difficulties inducing sleep (3.98 (2.94-5.40)), difficulties maintaining sleep (3.44 (2.55-4.64)), early morning awakening (4.71 (3.47-6.38)) and excessive daytime sleepiness (4.56 (3.36-6.18)). The addition of persistent allergic rhinitis to CRS further increased the risk of sleep problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sleep problems are highly prevalent among subjects with CRS. The disease severity of CRS negatively affects sleep quality.

  • 47. Berg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Bäckström, Tobias
    Winberg, Svante
    Lindberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Developmental exposure to fluoxetine modulates the serotonin system in hypothalamus2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e55053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLU, Prozac®) is commonly prescribed for depression in pregnant women. This results in SSRI exposure of the developing fetus. However, there are knowledge gaps regarding the impact of SSRI exposure during development. Given the role of serotonin in brain development and its cross-talk with sex hormone function, we investigated effects of developmental exposure to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of FLU (3 and 30 nM (measured)) on brain neurotransmitter levels, gonadal differentiation, aromatase activity in brain and gonads, and the thyroid system, using the Xenopus tropicalis model. Tadpoles were chronically exposed (8 weeks) until metamorphosis. At metamorphosis brains were cryosectioned and levels of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and their metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid were measured in discrete regions (telencephalon, hypothalamus and the reticular formation) of the cryosections using high-performance liquid chromatography. Exposure to 30 nM FLU increased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in hypothalamus compared with controls. FLU exposure did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis, thyroid histology, gonadal sex differentiation, or aromatase activity implying that the effect on the serotonergic neurotransmitter system in the hypothalamus region was specific. The FLU concentration that impacted the serotonin system is lower than the concentration measured in umbilical cord serum, suggesting that the serotonin system of the developing brain is highly sensitive to in utero exposure to FLU. To our knowledge this is the first study showing effects of developmental FLU exposure on brain neurochemistry. Given that SSRIs are present in the aquatic environment the current results warrant further investigation into the neurobehavioral effects of SSRIs in aquatic wildlife.

  • 48.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    If there is an effect of lead exposure on malaria, then the activity of delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) may play a role, as ALAD is imported by the parasite from the host2009In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 212, no 4, p. 445-446Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ahlqwist, Margareta
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Barregard, Lars
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Blomstrand, Ann
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University.
    Sundh, Valter
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg .
    Mercury in serum predicts low risk of death and myocardial infarction in Gothenburg women2013In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 71-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Markers of mercury (Hg) exposure have shown both positive and negative associations with cardiovascular disease (CVD). We assessed the association between serum Hg (S-Hg) and risk of cardiovascular disease in a prospective population-based cohort, with attention to the roles of dental health and fish consumption.

    METHODS: Total mortality, as well as morbidity and mortality from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke, was followed up for 32 years in 1,391 women (initially age 38-60), in relation to S-Hg at baseline, using Cox regression models. Potential confounders (age, socioeconomic status, serum lipids, alcohol consumption, dental health, smoking, hypertension, waist-hip ratio, and diabetes) and other covariates (e.g., fish consumption) were also considered.

    RESULTS: Hazard ratios (HR) adjusted only for age showed strong inverse associations between baseline S-Hg and total mortality [highest quartile: hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.59-0.97], incident AMI (HR 0.56; CI 0.34-0.93), and fatal AMI (HR 0.31; CI 0.15-0.66). Adjustment for potential confounding factors, especially dental health, had a strong impact on the risk estimates, and after adjustment, only the reduced risk of fatal AMI remained statistically significant.

    CONCLUSIONS: There was a strong inverse association between Hg exposure and CVD. Likely, reasons are confounding with good dental health (also correlated with the number of amalgam fillings in these age groups) and/or fish consumption. The results suggest potential effects of dental health and/or fish consumption on CVD that deserve attention in preventive medicine.

  • 50.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Torén, K
    Nilsson, Tohr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eriksson, Kåre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedlund, U
    Flodin, R
    Järvholm, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Increased mortality in COPD among construction workers exposed to inorganic dust: from the authors2004In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 512-512Article in journal (Refereed)
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