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  • 1.
    Andersson, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Our body body as an expressive tool2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Humans were made to move. Many hours in front of a screen leads to stiff bodies and a diminished bodily awareness. The aim of this project was to explore how technology can serve to increase our body awareness and adapt to our physical conditions in everyday life with focus on office spaces.

    The study is explorative with a user-centered approach and a focus on embodied prototyping, where the user is a subject of design. Data was collected with recordings, interviews, and workshops. Reflexion-on-action, prototyping and iterations lead to the final outcome.

    The final concept is a wearable that encourage people to move and stretch out more often and spontaneously throughout the day. It does so by vibration patterns along your spine and shoulders.

    The idea of this concepts is to make people move often and regularly during the day; to react spontaneously to a reminder from the body, mediated by the vibrations. The system is thought to be self-awarding; if it feels good to stretch out, to extend the arms, to move – then you will want to do it again.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Teaching and Learning (UPC).
    Nordic knowledge on the web2013In: Reformation, revolution, evolution: universitetslärandet ur ett tidsperspektiv / [ed] Erik Lindenius, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2013, p. 173-173Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Leckner, Sara
    Malmö högskola.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    The media consumers' conscious and unconscious choices: a key to understanding the news media consumption of tomorrow2014In: Communication électronique, cultures et identités: actes du colloque international organisé au Havre les 11, 12 et 13 juin 2014, Editions Klog , 2014, p. 521-528Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital society of today is dramatically different than that of a decade ago. During the past decades computers have gone from being clearly visible and at the center of attention to becoming an integrated and omnipresent part of our everyday lives. Today, individuals are catching up on a reality where homes, workplaces and society to a large extent consist of microprocessors that collect, analyze and present information. With regards to news and information sharing, it may seem that the users, thanks to greater ability to choose content, hold the upper hand in this process. However, since these data are constantly collected and analyzed for various purposes by companies, for example in the media industry, the users’ choices may not be as unconditional as they may think they are.Using the Swedish media market as an example, this exploratory paper discusses the interdependency between people’s choices and the market-driven choices made by the media industry in relation to news, and the impact these choices may have on media consumption and the media market.

  • 4.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Sara, Leckner
    Malmö högskola.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Mediekonsumentens medvetna och omedvetna val: en nyckel till morgondagens mediekonsumtion2014In: Medie-Sverige: statistik och analys. 2014 / [ed] Ulla Carlsson & Ulrika Facht, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2014, p. 29-37Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5. Bengs, Anette
    et al.
    Hägglund, Susanne
    Wiklund-Engblom, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML). Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland.
    Applying Experience Design to Facilitate Wellbeing and Social Inclusion of Older Adults2018In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 36, p. 11-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current article addresses the issue of how to design for meaningful experiences of wellbeing and social inclusion, supported by information and communication technology, among older adults. This is done with regard to a background study conducted for the purpose of collecting end user needs in order to inform design choices. Our design approach is influenced by the theory of Experience Design, in which design should be aimed at creating specific experiences. These experiences are considered to derive from a limited number of fundamental human needs. The study is framed as design research using the methodology of user-centred design as a guide for the creative process. Semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 25 older adults, identifying needs of autonomy, competence, relatedness, physical thriving, security, pleasure and stimulation. Design goals were set based on these needs and three interventions were designed and implemented accordingly.

  • 6. Bengs, Anette
    et al.
    Hägglund, Susanne
    Wiklund-Engblom, Annika
    MediaCity, Faculty of Education and Welfare Studies, Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland.
    Majors, Joachim
    Ashfaq, Anas
    Designing for social inclusion of immigrant women: The case of TeaTime2018In: Innovation. The European Journal of Social Sciences, ISSN 1351-1610, E-ISSN 1469-8412, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 106-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present our design of a digital service supporting social inclusion among immigrant women in an ethnically and socially diverse neighbourhood of a small Finnish town. The aim is to explore experiences and perceptions as well as potential barriers and challenges for using the web-based service. The case study is framed as design research having a strong user-centred design approach. We describe the design process and present the results of a mixed-method evaluation. The results are scrutinized from the perspectives of experience design. The analysis reveals a potential to facilitate social inclusion through the fulfilment of needs related to relatedness, autonomy, competence, pleasure and stimulations as well as popularity. However, some challenges in the interface design and communication of the security and purpose of the site were identified in the study. Significant differences were also found between immigrant women and local people regarding the need for this digital service.

  • 7. Bengs, Anette
    et al.
    Hägglund, Susanne
    Wiklund-Engblom, Annika
    Staffans, Simon
    Designing for Suburban Social Inclusion: A Case of Geo-Located Storytelling2015In: Interaction Design and Architecture(s) Journal, Vol. 25, p. 85-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article showcases a digital solution for strengthening social inclusion and well-being of senior suburban residents of a socially diverse Finnish town. The study is framed as design research where research is conducted in order to feed into a design process. A background study was first conducted in order to identify the target group’s needs, abilities, and attitudes towards the neighbourhood. The results revealed positive attitudes towards the area and the need for relatedness, autonomy, competence, pleasure and stimulation, physical thriving and security. Following a User-Centered Design process we based our design choices on these results and developed a local geocaching solution incorporating storytelling. The aim was to encourage senior citizens to socialize, be physically active and to experience the local urban place. An interview-based evaluation with older adults (n=6) combined with an analysis of online cache log data, showed positive experiences of the solution.

  • 8.
    Berglund, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Peterson, Susanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    "Det finns en "vi och dem"-känsla som beror på det geografiska": En kvalitativ fallstudie om hur samhörighet skapas på distribuerade IT-konsultbolag med hjälp av IKT2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    IT consulting firms increasingly work distributed with employees based in different geographic locations. In this there is a difficulty in developing and maintaining good soli- darity and togetherness. Former research indicates that organizations need to frame and comply with strategies regarding distributed work in order to be successful and competi- tive. This inquiry purpose to study the requirements needed to invent solidarity and togetherness in IT consulting firms. In this qualitative research the empirical data is gathe- red through semi-structured interviews which is complemented with relevant literature. In order to create a distinct structure a theoretical framework with focus on social processes has been designed. By using the theoretical framework concrete strategies was formulated. The essence in this inquiry’s conclusion is the comprehension of invisible values in distri- buted IT consulting firms. Invisible values refers to none-measurable aspects in the social working environment. This inquiry results in a few concrete suggestions regarding te- chnical solutions that can support the social processes in distributed organizations. 

  • 9.
    Björnfot, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Focus Group Foci: employing Participants' HCI and Application Domain Expertise in Interaction Design2015In: New Contributions in Information Systems and Technologies / [ed] Alvaro Rocha, Ana Maria Correia, Sandor Costanzo, Luis Paulo Reis, Springer Publishing Company, 2015, Vol. 353, p. 1057-1063Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper reports a study in which two aspects of interaction design - human interaction with technology and acting through technology were analyzed in the context of participatory sessions having the focus group format. The sessions were conducted as a part of redesigning a novel digital artifact, a web-based project management tool. An initial prototype of the artifact was introduced to two different groups of participants possessing expertise in, respectively, human-computer interaction (HCI) and teaching and learning, a key target application domain for the tool. Re-design suggestions provided by each of the focus groups were found to address issues with both user interface and functionality of the prototype. The main difference between the groups was in whether they primarily focused on interaction efficiency or artifact's integration into a larger social and technological context. Implications of the study for further development of participatory methods in interaction design are discussed.

  • 10.
    Björnfot, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Probing the design space of a telepresence robot gesture arm with low fidelity prototypes2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, IEEE Computer Society, 2017, p. 352-360Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general problem addressed in this paper is supporting a more efficient communication between remote users, who control telepresence robots, and people in the local setting. The design of most telepresence robots does not allow them to perform gestures. Given the key role of pointing in human communication, exploring design solutions for providing telepresence robots with deictic gesturing capabilities is, arguably, a timely research issue for Human-Robot Interaction. To address this issue, we conducted an empirical study, in which a set of low fidelity prototypes, illustrating various designs of a robot's gesture arm, were assessed by the participants (N=18). The study employed a mixed-method approach, a combination of a controlled experiment, elicitation study, and design provocation. The evidence collected in the study reveals participants' assessment of the designs, used in the study, and provides insights into parti.cipants' attitudes and expectations regarding gestural communication with telepresence robots in general

  • 11. Blevis, Eli
    et al.
    Bødker, Susanne
    Flach, John
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Young, Heekyoung
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    University of California in Irvine, USA.
    Rizzo, Antonio
    Ecological perspectives in HCI: promise, problems, and potential2015In: CHI EA '15: proceedings of the 33rd annual ACM conference extended abstracts on human factors in computing systems, New York: ACM Press, 2015, p. 2402-2404Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the workshop is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners to discuss the present and future of ecological perspectives in HCI. The participants will reflect on the current uses and interpretations of “ecology” and related concepts in the field. The workshop will assess the potential of ecological perspectives in HCI for supporting rich and meaningful analysis, as well as innovative design, of interactive technologies in real-life contexts.

  • 12.
    Chien, Yi-Ting
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Immersive Tour at Umeå’s Prison Hotel2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this project is to develop an immersive storytelling experience that connects with both physical and social environment. To be specific, it focuses on the old prison in Umeå which was closed in 1981 and nowadays serves as a hotel. There are abundant historical materials related to the old prison preserved, and how might we transform such textual, historical information into relatively interactive experience. By collaborating with Hotell Gamla Fängelset ( Umeå’s Prison Hotel ), the result turns out to be an application in combination with augmented reality (AR), to build a guided tour that brings history to life at Umeå’s Prison Hotel. The tour not only demonstrates the plight of the prisoners, but also showcases the reform to humanized treatment over time, at the end linking back to the cozy hotel where the guests are staying. After users experience the tour application, it stimulates people’s imagination of the prisoners’ story and raises their awareness towards the cultural heritage that has always been forgotten.

  • 13.
    Colledge, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Bridging the generational gap: Designing internet services for technologically-naïve older people using familiar interfaces2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Despite advances made in modern electronic devices, their use by older people is significantly lower than for younger people. They experience difficulties using devices due to a combination of physical, cognitive and ‘generational’ differences. Many studies try to adapt devices to make them more usable, but they do not consider how older people feel in terms of attitudes towards technology or their existing habits. Seven participants were interviewed about their current use of technology, as well as their attitudes to modern technology, and a personal inventory was created for each participant. The interviews generated themes relating to how participants feel that technology is not made for them, barriers to their use, and generational differences as well as arguments against modern technology use and perceived negative aspects of technology. Some design considerations were created and illustrated using features from the most commonly used devices that suited the interviewees’ attitudes, behaviours and opinions.

  • 14.
    Dijk, van, Jelle
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Moussette, Camille
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Radical Calshes: What Tangible Interaction is Made of2013In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction - TEI '13, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 323-326Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driven by a critique of Ishii et al’s recent vision of Radical Atoms we call for a debate on the different conceptual paradigms underlying the TEI community and its activities. TEI was initiated to share and connect different perspectives, but we feel conceptual debate is lacking. To fuel this debate, we start with comparing two paradigms by examining the Radical Atoms proposal and balance it from our design-led perspective. Our aim with this paper is to revive the richness of TEI’s multidisciplinary approach.

  • 15.
    Englund, Claire
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Teaching and Learning (UPC).
    Påverkar IKT universitetslärares pedagogiska förhållningssätt?2013In: Reformation, revolution, evolution: universitetslärandet ur ett tidsperspektiv / [ed] Erik Lindenius, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2013, p. 155-158Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Eurenius, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Från information till interaktion: En studie om hur en visualiserad digital patientjournal kan påverka patientkonsultationen.2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish healthcare are in need of radical changes to meet the requirements from both the government and the patients to create organisational working methods that better support the patients through their healthcare processes. Digitalization of patient data has been going on for decades in order to increase participation and understanding among patients in their care processes. However, availability of information does not ensure understanding. Therefore, resources should be devoted to create conditions to enable participation. The purpose of this study is to explore how visualization of patient data in the patient’s journal can affect the consultation in the encounter between the doctor and the patient. Qualitative interviews were conducted with both patients and doctors. The study suggests that a visualized digital journal could represent a educational tool and contribute to a greater understanding between the patient and the doctor, required that it’s features correspond rather comlex visualization. According to this study, greater understanding in the patient would reasonably generate more and different questions than today, which would not necessarily improve the efficiency in the konsultation. According to the study, greater understanding in the patient would reasonably generate more and different questions than today, which would not necessarily improve the efficiency in the konsultation. Furthermore, a visualized patient's journal may influence the salutogenic effect in the care process why demands regarding the way the resource should be used has to be established.

  • 17.
    Farshidi, Azadeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    A Secondary Task Test for Evaluating Cognitive Load of MRP Pilots2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Remotely-controlled technologies are no longer limited to military applications, such as unmanned military airborne weapons or explosive diffuser robots. Nowadays we can see more and more of remotely controlled devices used as medical equipment, toys, and so forth. One of the most recent areas of interest is robotic telepresence, also known as Mobile Robot Presence (MRP), which provides the ability to interact socially and professionally with other people and even objects in remote locations. One of the known issues with using remotely-controlled devices is the cognitive overload which their operators (pilots) experience and MRP pilots are no exception. However, despite vast research on different ways to address this in military or medical scenarios, little has been done regarding MRPs. This thesis study aims to make a contribution in closing that gap by suggesting a method, developing a prototype implementing it; then conducting an empirical assessment of the method and the prototype as a part of a broader study on MRP, supported by Swedish Research Council. I have suggested a method comprised of a Secondary-task (ST) method and Subjective Rating Scales (SRS), in which the latter act as an evaluation method for the former. Both of them were used in an overarching study in search for the best control device amongst four chosen devices. I collected and analyzed secondary task performance data (e.g. response time, error rates), subjective user ratings, explicit rankings, and observations recordings. My analysis of the collected data shows that using a monitoring and response face recognition secondary task is a plausible method for the assessment of MRP pilot’s cognitive load.

  • 18.
    Hansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    From Matter to Data and Back Again: Enabling Agency through Digital Fabrication2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Digital fabrication technologies such as 3D printers entail a radical change to the traditional consumer-producer paradigm. Combined with other recent developments, self-styled Makers design and fabricate sophisticated devices and interactive technologies that would otherwise never have existed. However, stopping the uninitiated novice from making use of this potential is complex CAD software, and a high barrier to entry. In this study a series of workshops explore the potential of combining traditional handicraft materials – such as clay, paper and fabric – with 3D scanning to enable novices to work with 3D printers. Based on the results a set of instruction were created detailing the process of making three types of practical objects, covering the entire process from the making and subsequent 3D scanning of a physical object, to the software clean-up and final 3D printing. The results suggest that whilst the explored method can enable novices to create 3D printable models, a certain mindset is required for the novice to do so effectively.

  • 19. Hassenzahl, Marc
    et al.
    Wiklund-Engblom, Annika
    Bengs, Anette
    Hägglund, Susanne
    Diefenbach, Sara
    Experience-Oriented and Product-Oriented Evaluation: Psychological Need Fulfillment, Positive Affect, and Product Perception2015In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 31, p. 530-544Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Hoshi, Kei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Reframing dichotomies: human experiential design of healthcare technologies2011In: Human-centered design of e-health technologies: concepts, methods and applications / [ed] Martina Ziefle (RWTH Aachen University, Germany); Carsten Röcker (RWTH Aachen University, Germany), Hershey PA, United States: IGI Global , 2011, p. 65-93Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic healthcare technologies support the interaction between patients and health-service providers, institution-to-institution transmission of data, and peer-to-peer communication between patients and health professionals. These technologies promise to deliver significant improvements in access to care, quality of care, and the efficiency and productivity of the health sector.Human-Centered Design of E-Health Technologies: Concepts, Methods and Applications unites researchers and industry practitioners from different disciplines to share their domain-specific knowledge and thereby contribute to a holistic introduction into the area of human-centered design for e-health applications. The knowledge and insights provided in this book will help students, as well as systems designers, to understand the fundamental social and technical requirements future e-health systems have to meet. By providing a well-rounded introduction within one single volume, this book is equally suited as a library reference and upper-level course supplement, but also represents a first-class resource for independent study.

  • 21.
    Hutchings, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    The politics of familiarity: visual, liturgical and organisational conformity in the online church2010In: The Heidelberg Journal of Religions on the Internet, ISSN 1861-5813, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 63-86Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “Online churches” are Internet-based Christian communities, pursuing worship, education, support, proselytisation and other religious goals through computer-mediated communication. This paper draws on three years of participant observation and 50 interviews to investigate reliance on the familiar in the aesthetics and sensory experience of online religion, a trend that previous researchers have noticed but not fully explained. I use two ethnographic studies to explore the range of motivations that can guide this common strategy and consider visual design, use of sound, avatar gestures, awareness of co-presence and the physical activity of the computer user. Key factors include the desire to “frame” participant expectations, “ground” online experience, demonstrate theological “authenticity” and encourage participatory leadership, and these achievements are used to validate experimentation in other areas. This strategy is not uncontested, however: “outsiders” are frequently deterred by styles that “insiders” consider “normal”, and both churches have begun to explore new forms of architecture, ritual and communication with no clear offline parallels. New blends of familiarity and innovation are emerging, indicating some of the future directions of online churchmanship.My two case studies, the Anglican Cathedral of Second Life and LifeChurch.tv Church Online, reflect two key trends among online churches: the proliferation of small-scale independent congregations and the increasing involvement of wealthy institutions. The empirical and theoretical dimensions of this paper are innovative and timely, drawing attention to the professionalization and domestication of online religion and the rise of the “online campus”, key developments that deserve considerable scholarly attention.

  • 22.
    Jahnke, Isa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Sülzenbrück, Sandra
    Avanzi, Roberto
    Meyer zu Heringdorf, Frank
    Enzner, Gerald
    Hofmann, Viola
    Schmuck, Beate
    Voss-Dahm, Dorothea
    Mensch 3.0: Risikokompetenz und Risikowahrnehmung im Umgang mit neuen Technologien2011In: Wissensgemeinschaften. Digitale Medien - Öffnung und Offenheit in Forschung und Lehre / [ed] Thomas Köhler, Jörg Neumann, Waxmann Verlag, 2011, p. 47-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23. Jarrahi, Mohammad Hossein
    et al.
    Snyder, Jaime
    Askay, David
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Karunakaran, Arvind
    From "Effects" to "Entanglements": A Fishbowl Discussion on Sociomateriality2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple research areas within the field of information studies grapple with the notion of technology and its role in social processes and outcomes. Recent theorizations on sociomateriality reflect a renewed interest in studying the mutually constitutive nature of the relationships among technology, materiality and social contexts (e.g., Leonardi, Nardi, & Kallinikos, 2012; Orlikowski, 2007). In specific, the sociomaterial perspective offers a promising path for `information' scholars to move from theorizing about the "effects" of specific technologies on organizational and societal outcomes to considering the constitutive "entanglement" among them.

  • 24.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Department of Information Science and Media Studies, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Affordances2014In: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction / [ed] Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis, Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation , 2014, 2Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of affordances originates from ecological psychology; it was proposed by James Gibson (1977, 1979) to denote action possibilities provided to the actor by the environment. In the late 1980s Norman (1988) suggested that affordances be taken advantage of in design. The suggestion strongly resonated with designers’ concern about making possible uses of their products immediately obvious, and soon the concept came to play a central role in interaction design and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). This chapter discusses the origins, history, and current interpretations of affordances in HCI research, and reflects on the future of affordances as an HCI concept.

  • 25.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Department of Information Science and Media Studies, University of Bergen.
    Designing mediation2015In: ECCE '15: Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2015, ACM Press, 2015, article id 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the concept of mediation in the context of current HCI research, with a special focus on the use of the concept to inform and guide the design of interactive artifacts and environments. The paper discusses the adoption of the mediational perspective on digital technology in HCI and reflects on how the perspective has informed design-oriented research in the field. It is concluded that there is a general trend of moving beyond relatively basic notions of technology mediation toward a more differentiated view of mediation as a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon. The paper outlines a set of dimensions, which characterize technological mediation in relation to properties of mediational means, subjects and objects of mediated activities, levels of mediation, dynamics of mediation, and context. Design implications of adopting a view of technological mediation as a multi-dimensional phenomenon are discussed.

  • 26.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Making the Case for an Existential Perspective in HCI Research on Mortality and Death2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, NY: ACM Press, 2016, p. 352-364Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Technology and the Givens of Existence: Toward an Existential Inquiry Framework in HCI Research2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. University of Bergen, Norway.
    The Mediational Perspective on Digital Technology: Understanding the Interplay between Technology, Mind and Action2013In: The SAGE handbook of digital technology research / [ed] Sara Price, Carey Jewitt, Barry Brown, London: Sage Publications, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Björnfot, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Tabula: a web-based coordination tool integrating task structure overviews and minimalist task workspaces2013In: International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1476-1289, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 250-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes the design, implementation, and tentative evaluation of a web-based coordination tool named Tabula. The tool employs a shared representation that has the form of a task/participant table. Individual cells of the table are designed as minimalist interactive workspaces, each supporting a particular user in performing a particular task. Integrating overviews of the overall structure of participants' tasks with task management features within a single representation is intended to help the user identify pending tasks, facilitate access to task-related resources, and support an automatic update of projects' visual representations. A prototype of the tool has been evaluated within an informal web-based course. The results of the evaluation are discussed.

  • 30.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Björnfot, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Danielsson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mobile Remote Presence Enhanced with Contactless Object Manipulation: An Exploratory Study2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press, 2017, p. 2690-2697Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A telepresence robot is a mobile telecommunication device, remotely controlled by its "pilot", which supports an embodied presence of the pilot in a different location (the "local setting"). A common problem with telepresence robots is their limited capability of interacting with the physical environment. A potential solution, explored in the present study, is supporting "double remote control" interaction, that is, making it possible for the pilot, in addition to remotely controlling the robot, to also remotely control objects in the local setting. In the study we enacted meaningful scenarios of employing telepresence robots with and without double remote control capabilities. The evidence collected in the study allows us to tentatively assess the effects of double remote control interaction on user experience and social context. Issues for future research are discussed.

  • 31.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Danielsson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Björnfot, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Revising Subjective Evaluation Scales through Collaborative Reflective Re-Scoring: The Case of an Instrument for Assessing User Experience of Mobile Remote Presence: ECCE 2017 Workshop Position Paper2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    Örebro University.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University.
    Hellström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Robots in Contexts: Human-Robot Interaction as Physically and Socially Embedded2017In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2017, 2017, p. 203-204Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33. Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    University of California in Irvine, USA.
    Activity Theory as a Framework for Human-Technology Interaction Research2018In: Mind, culture and activity, ISSN 1074-9039, E-ISSN 1532-7884, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Rizzo, Antonio
    Robertson, Paul
    Rosenbaum, Stephanie
    Crafting user experience of self-service technologies: Key challenges and potential solutions2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 companion publication on Designing interactive systems: DIS Companion '14, 2014, p. 199-202Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wasson, Barbara
    Guribye, Frode
    Self-service technologies in the hospitality industry: An exploratory analysis of interaction design issues2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Karlsson, Amanda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Understanding of bold social media content: A study of dick-pics as a way to communicate2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today it is just as important to understand the content on social media platforms as the technology that are being used. With the help of technology the content does not need to be just words but can also be anything from videos to simple symbols. Taboo subjects like dick-pics are often swept under the rug as being too offensive to talk about. But if technology is to keep up with the content even the sensitive subjects need to be understood. Since anyone can send anything to anyone it is important to show how different people react. If the sender of a dick-pic thinks it is amusing, it is important to tell how the receiver may react. It can be a self-representation to send a dick-pic, just to show a new or a hidden side of oneself. It can also be a way to exercise power over another person as well as harassing the receiver with a sexual picture. But a dick-pic could also be just a joke sent to someone and a way of communicating with friends. This is a quantitative research with 120 participants answering a questionnaire which focused on sending and receiving dick-pics and the reason and reaction of sending dick-pics online. The study showed three main reasons for sending dick-pics and the reasons were categorised as following: language online, self-representation and power structures.

  • 37.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    A Norm Creative Perspective: Understanding users through norm creative theories2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is a saying that we should not attempt to fix what is not broken, but we cannot afford to stick tothat mindset if we want to be able to design products and services that matter to the user. We shouldbroaden our views, explore new things and see what we can learn from them and use that knowledge toexpand on our existing methods. In recent years there have been a lot of work regarding how normsinfluence us to act and feel in certain ways, what if the knowledge behind norms could be utilized withindesign? To answer this question a study was conducted where two so called norm creative methodswere tested in a series of focus groups to see what potential the methods held in regard to improvingexisting methods or serve as basis for the creation new methods within user research.

  • 38.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Mediating group experiences: designing the in-between2015In: TEI '15 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York: ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 441-4444Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I present ongoing design research that explores mediating group experiences. The objective of the paper is to introduce subject matter and design research approach, to provide material for an in depth discussion of challenges.

    Several research designs are presented that yield insight in theoretical and conceptual aspects of remote group interactions. Themes emerging from them concern the concept of embodiment, in particular regarding the conceptualization and expression of groups through the mediating system, as well as embodiment of the system for the individual, in the sense of both incorporation and extension of action-perception capacities. To further articulate and express such themes, ongoing and proposed research is presented. Difficulty is brought forward in bringing the various research designs together as one body of work, particularly in relation to theoretical framework, related work and ultimately articulating contributions.

  • 39.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Aesthetics of being together2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design deals with matters of aesthetics. Historically, aesthetics in industrial design refers to the designed artifact: aesthetics of objects. When designed artifacts include digital technologies, aesthetics in design refers to what happens between people and artifacts as well: aesthetics of interaction. Now that these artifacts increasingly mediate our social lives, what aesthetics in design quite obviously also refers to, is what happens between people.

    This dissertation proposes an aesthetic of being together, as a necessary addition to current notions of aesthetics in interaction design practice, when it engages with digital systems that are part of people’s social life. It does not answer the question what Aesthetics is in general, instead it examines the work that particular notions of aesthetics do in interaction design practice.

    The practice based design research assembled in this dissertation starts from current notions of aesthetics in interaction design to explore the social experiences that mediated interactions between groups of people offer. What I found, through designing digital systems, is that current notions of aesthetics in interaction design are not conducive to addressing the kind of social experience people have with such systems. On the contrary, current notions actually inhibit interaction design to approach any experiences that cannot in the first place be conceived of as useful in terms of instrumental task performance. Yet, being social is hardly like performing a task or using other people in that sense.

    An aesthetic of being together is a proposition of a different fundament for interaction design practice. In addition to referring to properties of things and qualities of interacting with things, it refers to the kind of relations that come to expression between people interacting with each other with these things. Consequently, interaction design needs to resolve basic issues in what it considers and brings to expression, i.e. people’s relations with things and people at the same time. This requires (re-) considering what the designed thing is, what interaction is about and what the role of design is in bringing those to expression.

    My work contributes to the field of interaction design research an example of how, through practice, fundamental issues can be addressed. By orienting one set of concepts, ways of working and objectives into a different design situation, tensions built up that exposed foundational issues with that frame of reference, while pointing to the different fundaments needed to enable design practice to engage such situations.

    The results of the practical experimentation led to the articulation of a series of structural mechanisms of mediating systems.  These mechanisms provide material handles for interaction designers on how experiences of being present with others take shape. They configure the relations of artifacts and people in different ways than current notions of aesthetics afford. This theoretical investigation is then synthesised in the form of a new logic of expression for interaction design practice: an aesthetic of being together.

  • 40.
    Kuklo, Piotr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The future of podcasting: Envisioning an audio stories community for listeners and creators, where they connect through similar interests and share inspiring content.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores the future of podcasting as a digital audio media format for stories. As podcasts continue to grow in popularity the medium becomes more and more influential amongst all age groups. Unfortunately, existing solutions do not give enough attention to all possible aspects of the medium. Podcasts carry an untapped potential as they are often treated similarly to music files. This project consists of a platform, Cast3, with two separate products directed to listeners and creators of audio stories. The platform gives users a possibility to connect with similar minded people around specific topics through clubs.

    Inspiration and Method

    To understand the needs of listeners and creators of the stories, I immersed myself with the storytelling world and conducted a thorough research with conversations with both users groups, opportunities evaluations and concepts testing. The insights gathered during the research brought the conclusion that both listeners and creators tend to want more involvement and have stronger community gathered around audio stories. That is why the project’s goal is to form an audio story community for listeners and creators, where they connect through similar interests and share inspiring content.

    Result

    The final outcome of the project consists of a platform Cast3 that has 2 separate products directed to listeners and creators of audio stories. The platform gives users a possibility to connect with similar minded people around specific topics through clubs. The clubs are the spaces where listeners can exchange information, discover new content through a word of mouth and bond with the creators through live shows. The creators’ needs are supported through specialised tools that help to record stories and help to learn more about the listeners. The users of the platform can interact with audio stories through a redefined media format called freecasting. The new format improves a listening experience and respond to presently existing needs of listeners as well as creators.

  • 41.
    Laanpere, Jaak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Revealing the secret pieces of the puzzle: Studying the hidden influences of agile development context on user-centered design2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a world dominated by digital technologies, user-centered design aims to ensure that the users are catered with solutions that deal with their needs. As agile methods have become a prevalent approach in software development, it is crucial for the two disciplines to work together. However, existing studies have already presented incompatibilities between the methods of the two disciplines. This study intends to investigate the impact that agile principles have on the adoption of user-centered approach on a broader scale through the many parties involved in the process. By conducting interviews with practitioners and interpreting the results through the lens of Engeström’s activity system model, the findings of the study reveal significant influences imposed on the user-centered approach by external and organizational factors that are intensified by the agile principles. Three main areas of concern are identified and accompanied by broad suggestions on how to approach resolving them, focusing on the empowerment of UX designers, accurate deliberation of the intentions and practices of user-centered approach, and close collaboration to raise awareness of the benefits of user-centered approach. Lastly, it is emphasized that the identified areas of concern – primarily the problematic impact from clients and executives – need further extensive research to provide definitive solutions.

  • 42.
    Lindenius, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Reformation, revolution, evolution: universitetslärandet ur ett tidsperspektiv2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Stevenson, Marie
    Sullivan, Kirk P H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Supporting the Reflective Language Learner with Computer Keystroke Logging2008In: Handbook of research on computer-enhanced language acquisition and learning / [ed] Felicia Zhang & Beth Barber, Information Science Reference, Hershey PA, USE , 2008, p. 189-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lindgren, Tobias
    Umeå University, Umeå School of Education (USE). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Instruktionsvideo som undervisningsform: En analys av dess pedagogiska betydelse i gymnasieämnet Medieproduktion.2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna uppsats var att analysera instruktionsvideon som undervisningsform i ämnet Medieproduktion. Tidigare forskning visade att interaktiva läromedel på ett positivt sätt kunde bidra till lärande. Med det som utgångspunkt var den övergripande frågeställningen i den här studien ifall interaktiva läromedel kunde fungera som komplement till dagens undervisning och i så fall på vilket sätt? Påverkade användandet av instruktionsvideo lärarens roll i klassrummet? Vidare var meningen med studien att undersöka om det redan idag skedde en inlärning utanför skolans ramar via interaktiva läromedel. Samt om det i så fall togs i beaktande av skolans lärare. Fältstudier gjordes i form av fyra fokussamtal, med sammanlagt 11 elever på gymnasiets program estetiska med inriktning estetik och media och medieprogrammet, samt en lärarintervju. Resultatet från fältstudierna analyserades utifrån en behavioristisk, konstruktivistisk och sociokulturell syn på lärande där olika syn på kunskap utgjorde analysverktyg. Därigenom belystes olika perspektiv på lärande med hjälp av instruktionsvideo. Litteraturbearbetningen och fältstudierna visade att eleverna hade tilltro till digitala läromedel. Resultatet från den här studien bekräftade tidigare forskning om ett tydligt samband mellan användning av interaktiva läromedel och effektiv inlärning. Däremot visade resultaten att sambandet var situationsbundet och att undervisningsformen kunde medföra didaktiska svårigheter. Exempel på sådana svårigheter var om humor borde användas i undervisningsformen eller inte samt hur en instruktionsvideo rent tekniskt borde framställas. Slutligen framkom behov av fortsatt forskning som redovisades.

  • 45.
    Lisa, Lundgren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    An educational programming environment for the Swedish school2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Programming is currently being introduced as an obligatory part of the K-9 education in Sweden with the aim to strengthen pupils’ digital competence and prepare them with skills adapt for the 21st century. The challenge is now to successfully integrate programming as a tool for teaching and learning within existing practices. Teachers are expected to support their pupils learning about programming despite their own limited chance to acquire knowledge on the subject. The Swedish National Agency for Education (Skolverket)has given some guidance but research on this area is rather limited and a lot is left to the teachers to decide and educate themselves in. Educational programming environments (EPEs), especially aimed at novices, can support teachers in this integration but needs to be suitable for the objectives from the Swedish school to not unintentionally direct the way teaching is done. This study aims to answer how an EPE should be designed to fit within the Swedish school context with a focus on the teachers’ perspective. To study this, seven interviews were conducted with educators in middle school with experience of working with programming in the classroom, followed by two observations during lectures with EPEs. The results provided implications that were used to form design guidelines for an EPE aimed at the Swedish school.

  • 46.
    Malik, Naushin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designing to Support Spontaneous Purchase Decisions: Uncovering in situ social interactions while shopping2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 47.
    Markham, Annette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lindgren, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    From Object to Flow: Network Sensibility, Symbolic Interactionism, and Social Media2014In: Symbolic Interaction and New Social Media / [ed] Mark D. Johns, Shing-Ling S. Chen, & Laura A. Terlip, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014, p. 7-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses how certain sensibilities and techniques from a network perspective can facilitate different levels of thinking about symbolic interaction in mediated contexts. The concept of network implies emergent structures that shift along with the people whose connections construct these webs of significance. A network sensibility resonates with contemporary social media contexts in that it focuses less on discrete objects and more on the entanglements among elements that may create meaning. From a methodological stance, this involves greater sensitivity to movement and connection, both in the phenomenon and in the researcher’s relationship to this flow. The goal is to embody the perspective of moving with and through the data, rather than standing outside it as if it can be observed, captured, isolated, and scrutinized outside the flow. Rather than reducing the scope, the practice of moving through and analyzing various elements of networks generates more data, more directions, and more layers of meaning. We describe various ways a network sensibility might engender more creative and ethically grounded approaches to studying contemporary cultures of information flow.

  • 48.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Breaking Free: The Paradox of Bodies in WorkplacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of work is very much related to the history of bodies at work. Bodies  have always been a focal point in work design as sources of effort, knowledge  and skill for increasing productivity but seldom have they been the centre of  attention for their own good. Recently a handful of alarming studies indicate  problems associated with sedentary behaviour in offices. In order to interrupt  prolonged sitting and increase physical activity in workplaces many interventions  have been suggested. This paper is an attempt to breakdown the duality of bodies  in workspaces. Beginning by examining the history of bodies at work, we go on  to describe the role of bodies in today’s offices based on a three-month  ethnographic study. Finally, we discuss how current Interaction Design can aid us  in optimizing the role of bodies in carrying out future work.

  • 49.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Working out work: from personal informatics to redesigning work2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "Personal Informatics" (PI) and "Quantified Self" (QS) are two contemporary notions in the field of Human–Computer Interaction. Such hardware and software systems gather personalized quantified data and visualize them for the purpose of supporting self-reflection. Many of these systems focus on breaking the habit of prolonged sitting and increasing physical activity in our daily lives. The problems associated with the sedentary lifestyle and prolonged hours of sitting have been noted in many studies. In fact, stationary behavior is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and certain types of type of cancer. Nowadays we, as adults, spend more than 8 hours a day on work and work-related activities. As a consequence, the time spent sitting in office workspaces contributes to the majority of stationary behavior in our daily lives. Throughout history, designers and technocrats have constantly redesigned workspaces in attempts to increase work productivity and efficiency. Thus "modern" office work configuration includes desks and stationary computers and so office workers have become accustomed to prolonged sitting in their workplaces.    

    In relation to this research problem, I have worked on my PhD thesis within the context of a four-year cross disciplinary research project in which we have been exploring ways of increasing physical activity and breaking the habit of prolonged sitting among office workers. This is a thesis in informatics and closely allied to medicine and it focuses on studying how contemporary office work affects the body and how to redesign this context. For this thesis, I conducted three empirical studies and designed and developed two prototypes - the "NEAT Lamp" and the "Talking Tree". The "Sport Co." study was the first quantitative study, and was followed by two qualitative observational ethnographic studies – the "Housing Co." study and the "Health Co." study. The research process adopted during the work can be described as an intertwined process consisting of three methodological approaches: observational ethnographic studies, concept development and prototyping. These three came together to form a coherent contextual design process for tackling the research question, "How can we approach the design of work in today's offices in order to make office workers more physically active in their workspaces?"  This process resulted in five papers presenting various aspects and results of the research conducted. The results cover the role of bodies at work by considering the history of work design, knowledge about the local movement and mobility patterns of office workers in modern office spaces and eventually the design and evaluation of the two prototypes introduced in this thesis. Finally, I conclude this thesis by highlighting my overall contributions. The first contribution targets designers willing to design for increasing physical activity and breaking the habit of prolonged sitting in workspaces. In relation to this I introduce a design space as a tool for understanding the design of work in relation to worker’s bodies. The second contribution highlights how observational ethnographic studies, concept development, and prototyping can be combined when exploring the context of physical activity in office environments and it shows how contextual design might be a suitable approach for such studies. In addition, it emphasizes ways for how we can redesign work and expand our contextual knowledge. This, by examining and evaluating interactive prototypes in real office settings.

  • 50.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Deshpande, Parag
    Wahlström, Viktoria
    Olsson, Tommy
    Mikael, Wiberg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    A NEAT Solution: Where Interaction Design and Public Health MeetManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Office workers tend not to move about during work hours. A series of medical observational studies

    have shown that extended sitting is associated with several negative health outcomes including

    obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), breast and colon cancer and premature

    mortality. Therefore, developing ways to encourage physical activity and breaking the habit of

    prolonged sitting in offices is urgently needed. Few studies, however, have investigated the nature

    of local movement and mobility in workspaces in depth and taking a cross disciplinary approach.

    This paper reports on an ongoing cross-disciplinary research project targeted at increasing physical

    activity of office workers while reducing prolonged sitting. Our collaboration between the

    departments of Informatics, Public Health and Clinical Medicine and the Design School at Umeå

    University resulted in two ethnographic studies. This led to the development and implementation of

    two prototypes referred to as the “NEAT Lamp” and the “Talking Tree”. The “NEAT Lamp” is a

    simple sensor-based lamp that was evaluated in situ in our second ethnographic study. The results

    of this study deepened our understanding of local movement and mobility in offices and resulted in

    the design of a second prototype, the “Talking Tree”. Using the knowledge gained through our

    ethnographic studies and the experience of using the prototypes, we were able to develop a

    conceptual framework for describing the patterns of local movement and mobility of office workers.

    This paper describes the process leading to the development of this framework. Moreover, it

    highlights how this process benefited from the cross-disciplinary nature of the project.

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