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  • 1. Ahlbäck Öberg, Shirin
    et al.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    Hermansson, Jörgen
    Jarstad, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Karlsson, Christer
    Widmalm, Sten
    Projektsamhället och hoten mot akademin2016In: Det hotade universitetet / [ed] Shirin Ahlbäck Öberg, Li Bennich-Björkman, Jörgen Hermansson, Anna Jarstad, Christer Karlsson och Sten Widmalm, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2016, p. 9-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahlgren, Per
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication in Engineering Sciences (ECE), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pagin, Peter
    Department of Philosophy, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Svedberg, Maria
    Department of Philosophy, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bibliometric analysis of two subdomains in philosophy: free will and sorites2015In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 47-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we tested the fruitfulness of advanced bibliometric methods for mapping subdomains in philosophy. The development of the number of publications on free will and sorites, the two subdomains treated in the study, over time was studied. We applied the cocitation approach to map the most cited publications, authors and journals, and we mapped frequently occurring terms, using a term co-occurrence approach. Both subdomains show a strong increase of publications in Web of Science. When we decomposed the publications by faculty, we could see an increase of free will publications also in social sciences, medicine and natural sciences. The multidisciplinary character of free will research was reflected in the cocitation analysis and in the term co-occurrence analysis: we found clusters/groups of cocited publications, authors and journals, and of co-occurring terms, representing philosophy as well as non-philosophical fields, such as neuroscience and physics. The corresponding analyses of sorites publications displayed a structure consisting of research themes rather than fields. All in all, both philosophers involved in this study acknowledge the validity of the various networks presented. Bibliometric mapping appears to provide an interesting tool for describing the cognitive orientation of a research field, not only in the natural and life sciences but also in philosophy, which this study shows.

  • 3.
    Allard, Christina
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle.
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Contrasting nature, contrasting rights: concluding remarks2017In: Indigenous rights in modern landscapes: Nordic conservation regimes in global context / [ed] Lars Elenius, Christina Allard & Camilla Sandström, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 216-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Alldén, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Post-conflict reconstruction and women’s security: analyzing political outputs in East Timor2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Women’s inclusion in the reconstruction of war-torn societies is important for sustainable peace and functioning democratic states. This paper specifically addresses women’s security situation in East Timor, seven years after the country’s vote for independence. The peace process is generally viewed as a success story but seven years later, women face several obstacles to enhanced political, economic and social status in society. What policy outputs, in particular in the political realm, can be detected, and what, if any, obstacles face women in their struggle for increased security? Are women acknowledged as important actors in the democratization or was the “gender-friendly” peacebuilding process simply a rhetorical instrument that later turned out to ignore women’s situation when policies were to be implemented? The paper highlights several important political aspects crucial for building sustainable peace and for stabilizing democracy, and examines how these issues include or exclude women in East Timor.

  • 5.
    Amer, Ramses
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    The United Nations' Reaction to Foreign Military Interventions: A Comparative Case Study Analysis2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to analyse how the United Nations has reacted to foreign military interventions and which factors can help explain the reactions. In order to carry out the investigation the term foreign military intervention is defined, criteria for the selection of cases are formulated, and cases selected. This is followed by an examination of the United Nations’ reactions to the selected cases through the Security Council’s and the General Assembly’s responses to the interventions. The next step of the analysis is the formulation of a Hypothesis. This is done from a legal and normative approach to explaining the United Nations’ reactions. The Hypothesis is operationalised and tested through the formulation of two specifications. The two specifications are analysed in the context of the United Nation’s reactions to the selected cases. Based on this analysis the validity of the hypothesis is assessed.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Associations between atherosclerotic plaque and self-efficacy, depression and anxiety in an asymptomatic general population aged 602017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are caused by atherosclerosis. Carotid plaques are associated with increased risk of CVD, independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Evidence of early disease is demonstrated before onset and can be assessed with ultrasound. Psychosocial stressors, together with raised lipids and smoking have been identified as the most important risk factors. Cognitive factors such as self-efficacy have been identified as important constructs for health behaviors, and emotional factors do also play a role in this context. Therefore, the present study investigated the association between general self-efficacy, health-specific self-efficacy, anxiety and depression, on the one hand, and atherosclerosis, on the other hand, in a sample of 2291 participants aged 60 year from a general asymptomatic population. Among 2291 participants, 1247 had plaque and 1044 did not have plaque. The results showed that depression (in men only) and anxiety (in participants with university education only) were associated with plaque, and health-specific self-efficacy (in men only) was associated with absence of plaque. However, when statistically controlled for snuff, smoking, harmful alcohol consumption, diabetes, myocardial infarction, hypertension, hypercholesterol and sex or education no group differences were found. Variables share biomedical factors and is therefore possible statistically over-controlled. From an epidemiological perspective, even small changes obtained in a large population have high impact. Therefore, the research question is important and needs to be adressed with interdiciplinary compentence.

  • 7.
    Angelov, Angel G.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Ekström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Kriström, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    Gösta Ekman Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Testing for stochastic dominance: Procedures with four hypothesesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Asaro, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    A Body to Kick, but Still No Soul to Damn: Legal Perspectives on Robotics2012In: Robot Ethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Robotics / [ed] Patrick Lin, Keith Abney and George A. Bekey, CAMBRIDGE: MIT Press, 2012, p. 169-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Babri, Maira
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Corvellec, Hervé
    Lund University.
    Stål, Herman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Power in the development of Circular Business Models: An Actor Network Theory approach2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Baek, Seung Ki
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Minnhagen, Petter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Kim, Beom Jun
    Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Republic of Korea.
    The Ten Thousand Kims2011In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 13, p. 073036-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Korean culture the family members are recorded in special familybooks. This makes it possible to follow the distribution of Korean familynames far back in history. It is here shown that these name distributionsare well described by a simple null model, the random group formation (RGF)model. This model makes it possible to predict how the name distributionschange and these predictions are shown to be borne out. In particular, theRGF model predicts that, for married women entering a collection of familybooks in a certain year, the occurrence of the most common family name``Kim'' should be directly proportional the total number of married womenwith the same proportionality constant for all the years. This prediction isalso borne out to high degree. We speculate that it reflects some inherentsocial stability in the Korean culture. In addition, we obtain an estimate ofthe total population of the Korean culture down to year 500 AD, based on theRGF model and find about ten thousand Kims.

  • 11. Barbosa, Janaina T.
    et al.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Mota, João A.
    Power of design agency in building and sustaining collaboration: two cases in São Paulo2017In: Nordes 2017: DESIGN+POWER, Nordes , 2017, no 7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research has considered the power of collaboration in terms of the politics of artefacts, services and practices to build or to support publics. Working within a framework of “commons” as continuing processes of negotiation in collaboration, this study asks: How can designskills and agency build up collaborative capacities in urban communities for sustained processes of social innovation? This qualitative research explores two case studies in Brazil, where design agency is identified in social practices carried out by both designers and non-designers. Three key processes involved in designing collaboration were identified: experimenting, disrupting and sustaining. This work concluded that design skills facilitate the distribution of power to build collaboration through co-production of common spaces. This investigation contributes to the ongoing discussion of design and “infrastructuring,” identifying the power of design agency in building and sustaining collaboration in a complex social landscape of an emerging city.

  • 12. Beck, Jordan
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Examining Practical, Everyday Theory Use in Design Research2016In: She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation, ISSN 2405-8726, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 125-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how theories (as objects) are used in articles published in Design Studies. While theory and theory construction have been given time and attention in the literature, less is known about how researchers put theories to work in their written texts about practical, everyday theory use. In the present paper, we examine 32 articles and synthesize six models of theory use based on our examination.

  • 13. Beck, Jordan
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Examining the Types of Knowledge Claims Made in Design Research2016In: She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation, ISSN 2405-8726, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 199-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much has been written about designerly knowledge and designerly ways of knowing in the professions, less has been written about the production and presentation of knowledge in the design discipline. In the present paper, we examine the possibility that knowledge claims might be an effective way to distinguish the design discipline from other disciplines. We compare the kinds of knowledge claims made in journal publications from the natural sciences, social sciences, and design. And we find that natural and social science publications tend to make singular knowledge claims of similar kinds whereas design publications often contain multiple knowledge claims of different kinds. We raise possible explanations for this pattern and its implications for design research. Examining the Types of Knowledge Claims Made in Design Research.

  • 14.
    Beland Lindahl, Karin
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Sténs, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro universitet.
    Ranius, Thomas
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    The Swedish forestry model: more of everything?2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 77, p. 44-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "The Swedish forestry model" refers to the forest regime that evolved following the 1993 revision of the Swedish Forestry Act. It is key to Swedish forest politics and used to capture the essence of a sustainable way of managing forests. However, the ideas, institutions and practices comprising the model have not been comprehensively analyzed previously. Addressing this knowledge gap, we use frame analysis and a Pathways approach to investigate the underlying governance model, focusing on the way policy problems are addressed, goals, implementation procedures, outcomes and the resulting pathways to sustainability. We suggest that the institutionally embedded response to pressing sustainability challenges and increasing demands is expansion, inclusion and integration: more of everything. The more-of-everything pathway is influenced by ideas of ecological modernization and the optimistic view that existing resources can be increased. Our findings suggest that in effect it prioritizes the economic dimension of sustainability. While broadening out policy formulation it closes down the range of alternative outputs, a shortcoming that hampers its capacity to respond to current sustainability challenges. Consequently, there is a need for a broad public debate regarding not only the role of forests in future society, but also the operationalization of sustainable development.

  • 15.
    Bell, Andrew
    et al.
    University of Sheffield.
    Fairbrother, Malcolm
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jones, Kelvyn
    University of Bristol.
    Fixed and random effects models: making an informed choice2019In: Quality and quantity, ISSN 0033-5177, E-ISSN 1573-7845, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 1051-1074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper assesses the options available to researchers analysing multilevel (including longitudinal) data, with the aim of supporting good methodological decision-making. Given the confusion in the literature about the key properties of fixed and random effects (FE and RE) models, we present these models’ capabilities and limitations. We also discuss the within-between RE model, sometimes misleadingly labelled a ‘hybrid’ model, showing that it is the most general of the three, with all the strengths of the other two. As such, and because it allows for important extensions—notably random slopes—we argue it should be used (as a starting point at least) in all multilevel analyses. We develop the argument through simulations, evaluating how these models cope with some likely mis-specifications. These simulations reveal that (1) failing to include random slopes can generate anti-conservative standard errors, and (2) assuming random intercepts are Normally distributed, when they are not, introduces only modest biases. These results strengthen the case for the use of, and need for, these models.

  • 16.
    Bergman, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Polariseringens geografi: Regionala effekter av finanskrisen 20082018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper documents macro-economic change in Swedish regional labor markets during the last great recession (2008). This is made by using Swedish macro-data and analyzing employment flows over the period 2003-2013. The findings point to the fact that there is great disparity in the geography both when it comes to how the regions resist crises and recoup in the aftermath (Resilience) and how the crisis effect the labor market and its momentum in the recovery phase (polarization). The findings indicate that the 2008 financial crisis affected the Swedish regional labor market in a polarized development. Regions that showed patterns of this behavior before the recession managed to go through the crisis and recoup well, whereas the regions that didn’t show a polarized pattern before 2008 had a much harder time recuperating after the crises. With these findings we can generate a more sophisticated knowledge how regional economies can resist and recoup after financial recessions and use this to reduce the impact of future recessions. 

  • 17.
    Bern, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography, Transportation Research Unit (TRUM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Haugen, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography, Transportation Research Unit (TRUM).
    Jansson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography, Transportation Research Unit (TRUM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography, Transportation Research Unit (TRUM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Olsson, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    ”Det är ju som vilken annan bil som helst”: röster om elbilar2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lindqvist, Sara
    SLU.
    Kvastegård, Emma
    SLU.
    (How) Can adaptive moose management contribute to sustainable rural development?2013In: Welcome to the Anthropocene! The Nordic Environmental Social Science Conference, 11‐13 June 2013: Abstracts / [ed] Boon, T.E., Anker, H.T., Lund, D.H., Sehested, K., University of Copenhagen , 2013, p. 154-154Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of adaptive management (AM) is widely advocated as an alternative to traditional top-down management of natural resources around the world. In Sweden, however, AM has only recently been introduced to manage moose. Based on the analytical framework, developed by Pieter Glasbergen (2011), we study the AM of moose as a case of a partnership arrangement within the field of wildlife governance. We put particular attention on how adaptive moose management enables sustainable rural development, since hunting is considered to be an important source of recreation and livelihood in Swedish rural areas. We identify a number of challenges associated to the involved stakeholders’ abilities, willingness and understanding to implement the induced management system. We also emphasis the interactions between the different stakeholders on both vertical and horizontal levels, as well as the tradeoffs the new ecosystem based adaptive local management system generates for rural and urban areas.

  • 19.
    Blom, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Evertsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Perlinski, Marek
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    European social and caring professions in transition2017In: Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practicies / [ed] Björn Blom, Lars Evertsson and Marek Perlinski, Bristol: Policy Press, 2017, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Blom, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Evertsson, LarsUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.Perlinski, MarekUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practices2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection provides new insights about current welfare professions in a number of European countries.

    Focusing on research representing different types of European welfare states, including the Scandinavian and the Continental, the book offers in-depth understandings of professionals' everyday work within different contextual conditions, explored from empirical and theoretical perspectives. Subjects covered include knowledge and identity, education and professional development, regulation, accountability, collaboration, assessment and decision making.

    This is a valuable contribution to the discussion of professionalism and welfare professions, offering lessons learned and ways forward.

  • 21.
    Bohm, Ingela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lindblom, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Åbacka, Gun
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    'Don't give us an assignment where we have to use spinach!': food choice and discourse in home and consumer studies2016In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 57-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe classroom Discourses about vegetables during the planning, cooking, eating and evaluation of meals in the Swedish school subject Home and Consumer Studies. Fifty-nine students and five teachers were recruited from five northern Swedish villages and towns, and then observed, recorded and in some cases video-taped during lessons that took place between 2010 and 2012. Based on 56 instances of talk about vegetables, four Discourses were identified and related to the three aspects of Belasco's culinary triangle of contradictions: identity, responsibility and convenience. The results indicated that the identity-based sensory and cultural Discourses sometimes clashed with the more responsibility-oriented health and evaluation Discourses. The health Discourse was only used when there was an element of evaluation, with assignments connected to grades. In all other cases, the sensory and cultural Discourses guided vegetable use. Sometimes different sensory or cultural assumptions could clash with each other, for example when the teacher insisted on the use of a specific recipe regardless of a student's taste preferences. Since these preferences did not always harmonize with curricular demands for responsibility, there might be a risk of basing grades on aspects of students' identity. Alternatively, students might feel constrained to argue against their own identity in order to be favourably evaluated. Then again, if teachers always bow to student tastes, this limits their chances of learning about food and physical health. Viewing the dilemma through the lens of the culinary triangle of contradictions may help teachers and researchers develop teaching methods that take all aspects of food choice into account.

  • 22.
    Borgström, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Pensionärerna i Kramfors efterlyser mer fantasi i sina matlådor: En enkätstudie2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 23.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Nyberg, Gert
    SLU.
    Agroforestry Extension and Dietary Diversity: An Analysis of the Importance of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in West Pokot, Kenya2016In: Food Security, ISSN 1876-4517, E-ISSN 1876-4525, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 271-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide, the challenges of nomadic, pastoralist systems are causing their slow but steady disappearance in favour of sedentary agropastoralism. This paper draws upon an existing household data set from a survey collected and organized by the Swedish non-governmental organization (NGO) Vi Agroforestry, directed at a livestock-based, agro-pastoralist area in West Pokot County, western Kenya. The study focuses on the question of food diversity and malnutrition and the role of agroforestry extension services, i.e. knowledge spread, transfer and development. Our basic hypothesis is that certain fruit and vegetable related food groups are under-consumed in West Pokot, especially in the dryland areas. The results of the study shows that agroforestry, combined with advice through extension efforts can imply a transition path for pastoralists which involves improved dietary diversity, especially concerning food groups that include roots, tubers, fruits and leafy vegetables. From the results certain restrictions that hinder this transition become clear. An important but often overlooked factor is lack of information and knowledge as a determinant of household behavior in developing countries. NGOs such as Vi Agroforestry can play an important role in overcoming this restriction by providing extension services. Developing countries in general are not information-rich environments, a fact that is especially the case for poor citizens living in rural areas. The paper illustrates that careful attention to the information and knowledge available to households is necessary when designing development cooperation.

  • 24.
    Brandel, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Folatintag och folatstatus hos prematura barn: En kvalitetsundersökning vid en neonatalavdelning2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 25.
    Brändström, Sture
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Wiklund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Två musikpedagogiska fält: en studie om kommunal musikskola och musiklärarutbildning1995Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis consists of two parts. One is directed towards municipal music schools, and one deals with music teacher education at university level. The purpose was to investigate the recruitment to these two educations, and to describe and explain how different student groups perceived and used their education. Five empirical studies have been accomplished, and central questions were: which deliberate and non-deliberate choices of musical activities are made by children and music students, and how are these choices affected by socio-economical, geographical and gender prerequisites.Theoretically, the first part of the thesis was based on the educational sociology of Pierre Bourdieu and on previous empirical studies in music pedagogy. The first empirical study was directed towards the recruitment of pupils to the municipal music school in Piteå (n=1085). The study showed that two out of three pupils are girls. Furthermore, it was twice as common among children of higher employees and university graduates to study at the music school than among children with working class backgrounds. The second empirical study was an interview with children, 12-13 years of age (n=369). The results indicated that boys and girls understand and use music and music education in significantly different ways. Furthermore, differences related to socioeconomic background, musical background and residential area were also shown.The second part of the thesis begins with a summary of the origin and scientific basis of Swedish music pedagogy, followed by an investigation regarding recruitment to the music teacher education at the School of Music in Piteå (n=177). The investigation indicated that recruitment is socially biased, similar to that of the municipal music school. One third of the music teacher students were recruited from families where one of the parents worked as a teacher. One out of three students came from homes where religion was an important part of family life. In an interview-study with 60 music teacher students, differences related to gender and educational orientation arose in how students looked upon and used their education. The study showed two attitudes to music and music education, which were linked to the following concepts: musician code and teacher code. In connection with these concepts, three action strategies could be identified: navigation, revolt, and adjustment. These strategies were interpreted as an expression of the tension between the demands of the education and the individuals' wish to have his or her interests and needs met. The dissertation concludes with a project called "Self-formulated goals and self-evaluation in music education" and a short forward-looking discussion pertaining to questions that have been generated throughout the entire research process.

  • 26.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Påtvingade omställningar och det minskade utrymmet för anpassning: om rennäring, anpassning och kolonialism2012In: Bårjås, ISSN 1502-0002, p. 16-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Family matters: representation of Swedish Sámi households at the turn of the nineteenth century2013In: About the hearth: perspectives on the home, hearth, and household in the circumpolar north / [ed] David G. Anderson, Robert P. Wishart, Virginie Vaté, Oxford and New York: Berghahn Books, 2013, p. 103-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Colliander, Cristian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Science mapping and research evaluation: a novel methodology for creating normalized citation indicators and estimating their stability2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the methodology at the intersection of relational and evaluative bibliometrics. Experimental investigations are presented that address the question of how we can most successfully produce estimates of the subject similarity between documents. The results from these investigations are then explored in the context of citation-based research evaluations in an effort to enhance existing citation normalization methods that are used to enable comparisons of subject-disparate documents with respect to their relative impact or perceived utility. This thesis also suggests and explores an approach for revealing the uncertainty and stability (or lack thereof) coupled with different kinds of citation indicators.This suggestion is motivated by the specific nature of the bibliographic data and the data collection process utilized in citation-based evaluation studies.

    The results of these investigations suggest that similarity-detection methods that take a global view of the problem of identifying similar documents are more successful in solving the problem than conventional methods that are more local in scope. These results are important for all applications that require subject similarity estimates between documents. Here these insights are specifically adopted in an effort to create a novel citation normalization approach that – compared to current best practice – is more in tune with the idea of controlling for subject matter when thematically different documents are assessed with respect to impact or perceived utility. The normalization approach is flexible with respect to the size of the normalization baseline and enables a fuzzy partition of the scientific literature. It is shown that this approach is more successful than currently applied normalization approaches in reducing the variability in the observed citation distribution that stems from the variability in the articles’ addressed subject matter. In addition, the suggested approach can enhance the interpretability of normalized citation counts. Finally, the proposed method for assessing the stability of citation indicators stresses that small alterations that could be artifacts from the data collection and preparation steps can have a significant influence on the picture that is painted by the citationindicator. Therefore, providing stability intervals around derived indicators prevents unfounded conclusions that otherwise could have unwanted policy implications.

    Together, the new normalization approach and the method for assessing the stability of citation indicators have the potential to enable fairer bibliometric evaluative exercises and more cautious interpretations of citation indicators.

  • 29.
    Dahlbäck, Björn
    et al.
    Swedish Polar Research Secretariat.
    van der Watt, Lize-Marié
    Swedish Polar Research Secretariat.
    Jagodziński, Kamil
    Arctic Centre, University of Lapland.
    Kankaanpää, Paula
    Arctic Centre, University of Lapland.
    European Arctic Initiatives Compendium: Preparatory Action, Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment of development of the Arctic2014Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Demiroglu, O. Cenk
    Istanbul Policy Center.
    Ski Tourism, Europe2017In: The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism / [ed] Linda L. Lowry, Sage Publications, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Demiroglu, O. Cenk
    Istanbul Policy Center.
    Ski Tourism, U.S.2017In: The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism / [ed] Linda L. Lowry, Sage Publications, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Edelheim, Johan R.
    et al.
    The Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, Norway; Multidimensional Tourism Institute, University of Lapland, Finland.
    Thomas, Kimberly
    School of Hospitality, Food and Tourism Management, University of Guelph, Guelph, OT, Canada.
    Åberg, Kajsa G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Phi, Giang
    Department of Culture and Global Studies, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    What do conferences do?: What is academics' intangible return of investment (ROI) from attending an academic conference?2018In: Journal of Teaching in Travel & Tourism, ISSN 1531-3220, E-ISSN 1531-3239, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 94-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conferences are funny events. They are self-evident elements of our lives as academics: meetings that occur, often annually; take place in various locations; and involve (hopefully) like-minded people, aiming to share their latest research findings. Conferences are actually so selfevident that very little research exists analysing what takes place at conferences, why people attend them in the first place, and essentially what the conference does to delegates as participants. This article is, on one hand, a reflective report from an academic conference: TEFI 9 —Celebrating the Disruptive Power of Caring in Tourism Education. But it is also simultaneously an analysis of the implicit and explicit rationale and return on investment for attending academic conferences, in the words of three, at that time, PhD candidate rapporteurs and one professor rapporteur, who acts as this article's narrator.

  • 33.
    Edenheim, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Osten och vetenskapen: En 2000-talshistorikers tankar om firandet2013In: GläntaArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Do unequal societies cause death among the elderly?: a study of the health effects of inequality in Swedish municipalities, 20062013In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 19116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A lively public and academic debate has highlighted the potential health risk of living in regions and nations characterized by inequality. However, previous research provides an ambiguous picture, with positive association mainly having been found on higher geographical levels. One explanation for this could be that the effect of living in more heterogeneous social settings differs between levels of aggregation. 

    Methods: We examine the association between income inequality (using the Gini coefficient) and all-cause mortality in Swedish municipalities in the age group 65-74. A multi-level analysis is applied and we control for e.g. individual income and average income level in the unicipality. The analyses are based on individual register data on all residents born between 1932 and 1941, and outcomes are measured for the year 2006.

    Results: Lower individual income as well as lower average income level in the municipality of residence increased mortality significantly. We found an association between income inequality and mortality with excessive deaths in unequal municipalities even after controlling for mean income level and personal income. The results from the analysis of individual data differed substantially from analyses using aggregate data.

    Conclusions: Income inequality has a significant association with mortality in the age groups 65 to 75 at municipality level. The association is small compared to many other variables, but it is not negligible. Even in a comparatively equal society like Sweden, we need to consider possible effects of income inequality on mortality at the local level. 

  • 35.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Do unequal societies cause death and disease?: A study of the health effects on elderly of inequality in Swedish municipalities, 20062011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A lively public and academic debate has highlighted the potential health risk of living in regions and nations characterized by inequality (Wilkinson and Pickett 2007; 2009). It is argued that inequality may add to increasing health differentials over the life course. However, previous research provides so far an ambiguous picture. One explanation could be that the effect of living in more heterogeneous social settings may differ between levels of aggregation. A hypothesis is that homogeneity is positive on the national or regional level, while on a lower level of aggregation living in homogeneous settings could be detrimental for health, at least in poor neighborhoods.

    In this paper we present the preliminary results of our examination on how residence in unequal versus homogeneous areas is associated with health outcome of elderly people in Sweden. These first results are based on municipality level data on individuals born between 1932 and 1941 and the outcome is measured for the year 2006. Furthermore, we analyze the effect on health of income inequality (measured by Gini-coefficient) as compared to the effect of individual income and the average income level in the area. We analysed the associations both with individual-level and multi-level analysis. Our main finding is that inequality has an independent effect on mortality in the way that unequal municipalities have excessive deaths even after controlling for mean income level and personal income. This result was found not only in the individual-level analysis but also in the multilevel analysis.

  • 36.
    Ehn, Billy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Ethnology.
    Mångdisciplinära, "tvärvetenskapliga" utbildningar2007In: Utvärdering av fyra mångvetenskapliga utbildningar inomhumaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Stockholm: Högskoleverket , 2007, , p. 17-21p. 17-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Trumberg, AndersÖrebro universitet.
    Place and Identity: a new landscape of social and political change in Sweden2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is internationally renowned for its generous welfare state. However, over the past decades, changes in economic circumstances and population composition, as well as increasing population concentration in larger urban areas, have imposed new challenges to the Swedish model. What does this imply for individual and collective identity formation? Why and how have some places become more attractive than others? What individuals or groups prosper from these changes and who looses? The authors of this anthology highlight social and political change in Sweden from different perspectives, based on various studies in urban and rural Sweden. They represent five disciplines: history, human geography, political science, social work and sociology. Contextualised by theories on place and identity, the book's ten chapters focus on ageing, lifestyle migration, rural landscape, place branding, group identity, religion, music, the school as a meeting place, unsafety and residential projects. The participating authors are affiliated with the Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CUReS) at Örebro University, Sweden.

  • 38.
    Ekerholm, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Plikt och undantag: vapenfrilagstiftningen och det manliga medborgarskapet i Sverige 1965-19782014In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 31-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In countries where military conscription has been in force such service has been defined as a masculine duty as opposed to feminine caring and life giving duties. Conscientious objectors not only question a societal contract of duties and civil rights; they also challenge a politically hegemonic masculinity by opting out of one of its main homosocial arenas. This article investigates the changes made to non-combatant conscription service legislation and how it was discussed and designed as a condition for male citizenship in Sweden 1965–1978.

    In 1963, the Social democrats and the Liberals demanded changes in the restrictive non-combatant conscription legislation adopted during World War II. Critics regarded the connection of the non-combatant services to the armed forces as too manifest. New legislation was introduced in 1966. A state board was established to evaluate requests for civil service, transferring evaluation from the military to the civilian sector. The non-combatant service areas were expanded in order to take individual requests into consideration, without compromising the need for conscripts within the total national defense. Members of Jehovah’s Witnesses, who refused unconditionally, were controversially exempt from all service, as they were deemed unfit, comparable to alcoholics and anti-socials.

    A notable increase of ethical and political non-combatant applications in the last years of the 1960s and early 1970s proved challenging to the 1966 legislation. In 1973 a new governmental commission was appointed to propose changes. One problem was the application evaluation board’s partiality towards religious objectors and the nature of the proceedings, which were criticized for being too intrusive, thus clashing with the objectors’ civil rights. In 1978 the approved service sectors were further expanded into the civilian sector, for example by allowing environmental work, school assistance and service with the Red Cross. The legislative changes indicate that the link between conditioned male citizenship and military service was weakened, when challenged by the non-combatants’ alternative masculinities.

  • 39.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Förundersökning. Centrum för forskning om nationella minoriteter vid Luleå tekniska universitet2007Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Ellsworth-Krebs, Katherine
    et al.
    University of St Andrews.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts.
    Household sustainability and online research methods: A scoping paper2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this scoping paper we highlight where online methods may be going and how they might better contribute to studies of sustainable practices. We do so by conducting a literary review focusing especially on previous research conducted within the humanities and social sciences. 

  • 41.
    Englund, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Are we ready to mix reality in the workplace?: A field study gauging interest and needs surrounding mixed reality collaborative systems.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 42.
    Eriksson, Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Conventional and new ways of governing forest threats: a study of stakeholder coherence in Sweden2018In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 61, p. 103-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a framework for analyzing stakeholder coherence horizontally and vertically, the present study examined the governance of forest threats in Sweden. Opinions of forest risk governance in stakeholder groups with and without a connection to private forestry were compared (n = 2496) and the opinions were analyzed in relation to current governance practices. More specifically, forest threat appraisals, trust in the Swedish Forest Agency (SFA), and the acceptability of forest risk policy measures directed at private forest owners were assessed. Results revealed an overall coherence between different stakeholders in this context. However, the groups differed in, for example, the acceptability of the hypothetical regulative measure aiming to reduce damages threatening the forest long-term (e.g., climate change). Furthermore, an extensive use of advice for a fee may challenge particularly the internal, but also the external, legitimacy of forest risk governance. The forest owner stakeholder group showed lower threat appraisals when evaluating threat to one’s own forest rather than to the Swedish forest, except regarding browsing by animals. Regulations were not disapproved of in any of the stakeholder groups, although the forest owner group generally displayed higher acceptability of encouraging measures compared to the general public. Trust in the SFA was furthermore confirmed as an important driver of policy acceptability, and higher threat appraisals of novel threats, such as climate change and fire, resulted in a higher acceptability of measures less central or new in this context. The value of analyzing stakeholder coherence for natural resource management and governance is discussed.

  • 43.
    Eriksson, Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Effects of policy measures and moderating factors on climate change adaptation among private forest owners in Sweden2018In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 409-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Threats associated with climate change may damage forests. To encourage adaptation in countries with a lot of privately owned forest, policy measures directed at private forest owners may be implemented. By means of policy scenarios, the present study examined the effects of two hypothetical policies: an advice and an economic incentive, on climate change adaptation among private forest owners in Sweden (n = 753 and n = 729). Both policies strengthened the intention to adapt, although results also revealed that individual variables (i.e., forest values), and a contextual variable (i.e., being in an encouraging social risk management context) were important for the owners’ response. Production forest values and social risk management context furthermore moderated the effect of policy on intention to adapt, suggesting that the economic incentive was mainly more effective than the advice among owners with strong production values and among owners in less encouraging social risk management contexts.

  • 44.
    Eriksson, Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Explaining gender differences in private forest risk management2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 716-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries, lower levels of forest management activities have been observed among female forest owners compared to male owners. The present study examined potential explanations for gender differences in private forest risk management among forest owners in Sweden (n=1482) using a questionnaire. Results from this study confirmed a slightly lower level of forest risk management among female owners in proactively combating damage caused by climate change and animal browsing when compared to their male counterparts. Further gender differences were revealed on a structural level. For example, female owners displayed higher levels of education and were more often non-resident owners and urban owners, as compared to their male counterparts. In addition, female and male owners differed regarding social-psychological variables (e.g. forest values and threat and coping appraisals). However the greatest gender difference was found in involvement in forest planning and forestry work. Even though gender differences were evident on multiple levels, involvement in forest issues and forest planning were found to be most important for explaining gender differences in forest risk management. By disentangling predictors of gender differences in private forest risk management, this study may contribute to a more strategic gender approach to forest risk governance.

  • 45.
    Eriksson, Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Boberg, Johanna
    Cech, Thomas L.
    Corcobado, Tamara
    Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure
    Hietala, Ari M.
    Horta Jung, Marília
    Jung, Thomas
    Lehtijarvi, Hatice Tugba Dogmus
    Oskay, Funda
    Slavov, Slavtcho
    Solheim, Halvor
    Stenlid, Jan
    Oliva, Jonàs
    Invasive forest pathogens in Europe: Cross-country variationin public awareness but consistency in policy acceptability2019In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political action can reduce introductions of diseases caused by invasive forest pathogens (IPs) and public support is important for effective prevention. The public’s awareness of IP problems and the acceptability of policies aiming to combat these pathogens were surveyed in nine European countries (N = 3469). Although awareness of specific diseases (e.g., ash dieback) varied, problem awareness and policy acceptability were similar across countries. The public was positive towards policies for informational measures and stricter standards for plant production, but less positive towards restricting public access to protected areas. Multilevel models, including individual and country level variables, revealed that media exposure was positively associated with awareness of IP problems, and strengthened the link between problem awareness and policy acceptability. Results suggest that learning about IPs through the media and recognizing the associated problems increase policy acceptability. Overall, the study elaborates on the anthropogenic dimension of diseases caused by IPs.

  • 46.
    Eriksson, Mathilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Mitigating climate change with forest climate tools2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops the FRICE, a framework that determines optimal levels of forest climate tools in the context of global climate policy. The paper integrates afforestation and avoided deforestation into the well-known global multi-regional integrated assessment model, RICE-2010. The paper finds that climate forest tools can play an essential role in global climate policy and that this role is increasingly important under stringent temperature targets. Under a 2_C temperature target, the model reveals that emission reductions from avoided deforestation are quickly exhausted whereas afforestation is capable of substantially reducing emission reductions in both the medium and long run. The model also indicates that the most significant reductions in emissions from avoided deforestation and afforestation can be achieved by focusing policy efforts on tropical forests.

  • 47.
    Eriksson, Mathilda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Lundgren, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Pricing forest carbon: implications of asymmetry in climate policy2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we use an integrated assessment model to examine the implications of not recognizing, and partially recognizing forest carbon in climate policy. Specifically, we investigate the impact of an asymmetric carbon policy that recognizes emissions from fossil fuels while ignoring emissions from forests. We additionally investigate the relative importance of not recognizing positive emissions from a reduction in the stock of forest biomass, or of not recognizing negative emissions from the growth of forest biomass. We show that asymmetric carbon policies lead to lower levels of welfare, as well as higher emissions and carbon prices. This occurs because the forest resource will be allocated inefficiently under these carbon policies. Broadly, we find that when the social planner does not account for neither positive or negative forest emissions, the planner will set bioenergy levels that are too high and afforestation and avoided deforestation levels that are too low. Our results further reveal that not recognizing forest emissions leads to larger welfare losses than not recognizing sequestration.

  • 48. Eriksson, Mathilda
    et al.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Lundgren, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Pricing forest carbon: implications of asymmetry in climate policy2018In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, E-ISSN 1618-1530, Vol. 32, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using an integrated assessment model, we examine the implications of climate policies that do not fully recognize forest carbon. Specifically, we first investigate the impact of an asymmetric policy that recognizes carbon emissions from fossil fuels while fully ignoring forest carbon. Next, we investigate the relative importance of not recognizing emissions from a reduction in the stock of forest biomass compared to not recognizing sequestration from the growth of forest biomass. We show that asymmetric carbon policies lead to lower levels of welfare, as well as higher emissions and carbon prices. This occurs because the forest resource will be allocated inefficiently under these carbon policies. Broadly, we find that when the social planner does not account for emissions or sequestration from the forest, the planner will set bioenergy levels that are too high and afforestation and avoided deforestation levels that are too low. Our results further reveal that not recognizing forest emissions leads to larger welfare losses than not recognizing sequestration.

  • 49.
    Eriksson, Mathilda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Vesterberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    When not in the best of worlds: uncertainty and forest carbon sequestration2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is argued that the forest can provide low-cost options to reduce the atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, many dimensions of the future dynamics of the forest, and its interactions with climate change are still not well understood. This paper provides new insights into how these types of uncertainties affect the optimal climate policy. We model uncertainty over several key forest parameters by using the novel state-contingent approach. Our main results show that the importance of including optimal forest controls in climate policy increases when the dynamics of the forest are uncertain. Ignoring uncertainties concerning the forest will lead to biased estimates of the social costs of carbon and be misleading when evaluating climate policies. Conversely, recognizing forest uncertainties and its potential to mitigate climate change will lead to a robust policy where the cost of uncertainty to a large extent can be avoided.

  • 50.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Nymand Larsen, JoanPaasche, Øyvind
    The new Arctic2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
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