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  • 1.
    Gelfgren, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Why does the archbishop not tweet?: how social media challenge church authorities2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 109-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In summer 2012, the Archbishop of the Church of Sweden appeared on Twitter. There was only one problem – it was not the Archbishop himself who was tweeting, but an anonymous person. A discussion then ensued on Twitter and in the blogosphere between those in favor of the Archbishop and his department and mainly social media proponents.

    The present article describes and analyzes the social media debate, and how authority and hierarchies are negotiated in and through social media. The analysis is based on Heidi Campbell’s “Religious-Social Shaping of Technology” model, and emphasizes the need to take into account not only the faith and tradition of the religious actor, but also the societal context in which the negotiating process takes place. In this case, the concepts of “media- tization” and “secularization” are used to understand the broader context of the process. 

  • 2.
    Isaksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Swedish Cinema and the Sexual Revolution: Critical Essays2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 129-133Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Lischinsky, Alon
    et al.
    Oxford Brooks University.
    Egan Sjölander, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Talking Green in the Public Sphere: Press Releases, Corporate Voices and the Environment2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no Special, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a climate of growing public concern and monitoring of business's impact on the environment, corporations and industry groups have developed increasingly sophisticated strategies to manage their environmental reputation and to influence the outcome of environmental debates in the public sphere. In this article, we provide an exploratory overview of how the largest Swedish corporations selectively subsidise environmental news-making by supplying it with promotional materials disguised as journalistic copy. We analyse a year's worth of public relations output from the largest 15 companies traded in the Stockholm exchange or owned by the Swedish state, in order to shed light on the environmental themes they cover, the techniques they adopt to maximise the likelihood of media coverage and the evidence they provide to support their claims. Our analysis shows that corporate voices make substantial use of environmental and ecological arguments in their strategic communication, but they provide little useful information about the company's impact and do not usually foster forms of dialogic stakeholder engagement.

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  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
More languages
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