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  • 1. Andersen, Oddmund
    et al.
    Lorås, Jostein
    Storaunet, Ken Olaf
    Hjortfors, Lis-Mari
    Árran, julevsáme guovdasj/lulesamiskt center.
    Sámi settlement and the use of pine inner bark in Lønsdal, Nordland, Norway: dating and historical context2013In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. 30, no XXX, p. 55-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inner bark of Pinus sylvestris (L.) used to be an important dietary resource for the Sámi. The bark was harvested in June. In the Lule Sámi language this month is called biehtsemánno meaning ‘pine month’. In Lønsdalen, within Pite-Sámi area in Nordland county, northern Norway, we recorded 107 pine trees with 125 bark-peelings, of which 103 were successfully cross-dated by dendrochronology. The oldest peeling was from 1636, whereas the youngest peeleing was done in the 1880s. The same area also contains many physical cultural remains of the Sámi. We performed archaeological excavations of four hearths which were located between these bark-peeled trees. Radiocarbon datings showed that these settlements were used from the Late Iron Age or Early Medieval to the present time. Thus, the region has been important to the Sámi people for a long time. In this article we argue for a relationship between the many bark-peeled trees and the settlements.

  • 2.
    Grabowski, Radoslaw
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Olsen, Bjørnar
    Tromsø Universitet.
    Petursdottir, Þora
    Witmore, Christopher
    Teillager 6 Sværholt: The Archaeology of a World War II Prisoner of War Camp in Finnmark, Arctic Norway2014In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. 31, p. 3-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of fieldwork undertaken over the last four summers at a World War II prisoner of war camp at Sværholt in northernmost Norway. The labour camp for Soviet prisoners was established in 1942 as part of the construction of the German coastal battery at Sværholt, a fortification within the Atlantic Wall. In late fall 1944 the camp, the coastal fort, and the local Norwegian hamlet were abandoned and destroyed in step with the massive and abrupt German retreat from this northern region. This paper describes the remains of the camp and the coastal fort, as still manifest in the barren landscape, and presents in detail the findings of excavations and associated investigations conducted in the camp area. Analysing these findings, particular emphasis is placed on the question of what an archaeological approach can divulge concerning the camp, its construction and conditions, and the ‘trivial’ details of everyday life often passed over by historical accounts. Ultimately, we suggest that the things found challenge our common assumptions about the relationship between prisoners, guards, and locals, and further discuss to what extent the forced encounter at Sværholt also may have included some measures of sympathy within the yet hostile context of war and occupation.

  • 3.
    Ramqvist, Per H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Hörnberg, Greger
    Silvermuseet.
    Burial mounds as settlement indicators: archaeological and palynological investigations at Sangis, northern Sweden2015In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. XXXII, p. 121-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grave mounds established during the 1st millennium AD in northern Sweden are common in central Norrland, up to northern Ångermanland. There are, however, two grave mounds located 350 km further north, close to the villages of Sangis and Espinära, that stand out as anomalies. These mounds rise questions regarding who established them and why? We hypothesised that they were established close to sedentary settlements, just as the ones found further south. To identify old settlement remains and traces of ancient land use, an archaeological excavation was performed of the sand ridge where the Sangis grave mound is located, and a palynological study was conducted to identify local vegetation changes. The results show that no sedentary settlement accompanied the mound. The area had, however, two phases of land use; as an occasionally visited site from calAD 600 to 800 when the grave mound and possibly a cooking pit was established, and; from calAD 1070 when human impact on the ridge restarted, probably associated to permanent settlements nearby.

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