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  • 1.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Odontologiska Institutionen, Jönköping.
    Norderyd, J
    Bågesund, M
    Holst, A
    Signs and symptoms from ectodermal organs in young Swedish individuals with oligodontia2006In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 320-326Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Grahn, K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Wikström, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Nyman, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Attitudes about dental care among parents whose children suffer from severe congenital heart disease: a case-control study2006In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine attitudes and experiences of parents whose children have complex congenital heart disease (CHD) with respect to dental health information and advice, dental care, and service and to compare the results with data from an age- and gender-matched control group without any medical problems.

    SETTING: Faculty of Medicine (Paediatric Cardiology and Paediatric Dentistry), Umea University, Umea, Sweden.

    SAMPLE AND METHOD: Each group comprised parents of 33 children; the children's mean age was 9.4 years. All the cases and the controls resided in the county of Vasterbotten, northern Sweden. Data were collected with a questionnaire with 20 joint questions to both groups and four additional questions to the CHD group.

    RESULTS: Of the 20 joint questions, significant differences were displayed in the following areas: the professional group that provided the parents with dental health information and advice (P < 0.01), attitudes to reception at the dental clinic, and experience of sedation before operative dental treatment (P < 0.05). Parents to 11 children with CHD who were patients at a specialist clinic for paediatric dentistry scored the reception at the dental clinic as excellent in nine cases and satisfactory in two, compared to excellent (3), satisfactory (11), decent (4), and poor (4) among those who were patients in general dental practice (P < 0.01). No statistically significant differences in educational level or in parental experience of dental health were noted between the two groups (P > 0.05).

    CONCLUSION: Children with CHD in northern Sweden mainly receive their dental health information from a physician or a dentist, and healthy children mainly receive information from a dental hygienist indicating that children with CHD are given priority in the dental care system. Parental attitudes to reception in the dental service differed, and parents of healthy children scored the reception at the dental clinic better than parents of children with CHD. It is suggested that children with severe CHD should receive dental care in clinics for paediatric dentistry, particularly at early ages.

  • 3.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Twetman, Svante
    Caries prevalence in children with cleft lip and palate: a systematic review of case-control studies2007In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 313-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To conduct a systematic review of literature in order to examine the evidence of an increased prevalence of dental caries in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP).

    METHODS: A search of the PubMed database was conducted through May 2006. Sex- and age-matched case-control studies with noncavitated and manifest caries lesions as endpoint were targeted (n = 6). The studies were assessed independently by two reviewers and scored A-C according to predetermined criteria for methodology and performance.

    RESULTS: Significantly more caries in CLP children were reported in two of the four studies in the permanent dentition and in three out of four publications dealing with primary teeth. None of the articles were, however, assessed with the highest grade 'A' and the level of evidence was therefore based on three papers graded 'B'. There was a tendency towards higher caries scores in preschool children, but as conflicting results were revealed, the evidence that children with CLP exhibit more caries than noncleft controls was inconclusive.

    CONCLUSION: This systematic review of literature was unable to find firm evidence for the assumption that CLP children have an increased prevalence of dental caries.

  • 4.
    Holgerson, Pernilla L
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry. Pedodonti.
    Sjöström, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry. Pedodonti.
    Stecksen-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry. Pedodonti.
    Twetman, Svante
    Dental plaque formation and salivary mutans streptococci in schoolchildren after use of xylitol-containing chewing gum.2007In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 79-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a fixed daily dose of xylitol on mutans streptococci in saliva and the amount of visible dental plaque. A second aim was to explore if the possible effects differed between children with and without caries experience. METHODS: The study was designed as a double-blind randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms. All pupils (n=149) in grades 1-6 in a comprehensive school in northern Sweden were invited, and 128 children (mean age=12.7 years) consented to participate. The children were stratified as having caries experience (DMFS/dmfs>or=1) or not before the random allocation to a test or control group. The control group (A) was given two pellets containing sorbitol and maltitol three times daily for 4 weeks, and the test group (B) received corresponding pellets with xylitol as single sweetener (total dose=6.18 g day). Clinical scoring and saliva samples were collected at baseline and immediately after the test period. The outcome measures were visible plaque index, salivary mutans streptococci counts and salivary lactic acid production. RESULTS: The amount of visible plaque was significantly reduced in both groups after 4 weeks (P<0.05). Likewise, the sucrose-induced lactic acid formation in saliva diminished in both groups (P<0.05). The proportion of mutans streptococci decreased significantly in the test group compared to baseline, but not in the control group (P<0.05). The alterations in the test group seemed most prominent among children without previous caries experience. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that chewing gum with xylitol or sorbitol/maltitol can reduce the amount of dental plaque and acid production in saliva in schoolchildren, but only the xylitol-containing gum may also interfere with the microbial composition.

  • 5. Klingberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Andersson-Wenckert, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Grindefjord, Margaret
    Lundin, Sven-Ake
    Ridell, Karin
    Tsilingaridis, Georgios
    Ullbro, Christer
    Specialist paediatric dentistry in Sweden 2008-a 25-year perspective2010In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 313-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Paediatric dentistry in Sweden has been surveyed four times over the past 25 years. During this period postgraduate training, dental health, and the organization of child dental care have changed considerably. Aim. To investigate services provided by specialists in paediatric dentistry in Sweden in 2008, and to compare with data from previous surveys. Design. The same questionnaire was sent to all 30 specialist paediatric dental clinics in Sweden that had been used in previous surveys. Comparisons were made with data from 1983, 1989, 1996 and 2003. Results. Despite an unchanged number of specialists (N = 81 in 2008), the number of referrals had increased by 16% since 2003 and by almost 50% since 1983. There was greater variation in reasons for referrals. The main reason was still dental anxiety/behaviour management problems in combination with dental treatment needs (27%), followed by medical conditions/disability (18%), and high caries activity (15%). The use of different techniques for conscious sedation as well as general anaesthesia had also increased. Conclusions. The referrals to paediatric dentistry continue to increase, leading to a heavy work load for the same number of specialists. Thus, the need for more paediatric dentists remains.

  • 6.
    Lockner, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Twetman, Svante
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children2017In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 463-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored.

    AIM: To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste.

    DESIGN: Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste. After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode.

    RESULTS: There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P < 0.01). When fluoridated toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18).

    CONCLUSIONS: Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste in connection with the varnish applications would decrease fluoride exposure.

  • 7.
    Sandström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Cressey, Janet
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Tooth-brushing behaviour in 6-12 year olds2011In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plaque removal from buccal surfaces from brushing was poor and averaged 19% for 6-year olds and 30% for older children. The results of brushing for children aged 8-12 years could benefit from increasing tooth-brushing time. Children could be given an increasing responsibility from 7 to 8 year of age but parental help is motivated up to 10 years of age.

  • 8.
    Stecksen-Blicks, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Lif Holgerson, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Twetman, Svante
    Department of Cariology and Endodontics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Effect of xylitol and xylitol-fluoride lozenges on approximal caries development in high-caries-risk children2008In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 170-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of xylitol- and xylitol/fluoride-containing lozenges on approximal caries development in young adolescents with high caries risk.

    Study design: A 2-year double-blind trial with two parallel arms and a nonrandomized reference group.

    Material and methods: One hundred and sixty healthy 10- to 12-year-old children with high caries risk were selected. After informed consent, they were randomly assigned into a xylitol and a xylitol/fluoride group. They were instructed to take two tablets three times a day (total xylitol and fluoride dose 2.5 g and 1.5 mg, respectively). The compliance was checked continuously and scored as good, fair, or poor. A reference no-tablet group was also selected (n = 70) for group comparison. The outcome measure was approximal caries incidence.

    Results: The dropout rate was 28%, and 41% exhibited a good compliance with the study protocol. No statistically significant differences in caries incidence could be found between the study groups (P > 0.05). Among a subgroup of children who demonstrated good compliance, the mean DeltaDMFSa value was significantly lower in the xylitol/fluoride group compared to the xylitol group, 1.0 +/- 2.3 vs. 3.3 +/- 4.6 (P < 0.05), while no difference could be displayed between any of the study groups and the reference group (P > 0.05).

    Conclusions: The results from this 2-year trial did not support a self-administered regimen of xylitol- or xylitol/fluoride-containing lozenges for the prevention of approximal caries in young adolescents with high caries risk.

  • 9.
    Stecksen-Blicks, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Nyman, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Asplund, S
    Svanberg, C
    Dental caries experience in children with congenital heart disease: a case-control study2004In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To compare the dental health in a group of children with complex congenital heart disease with age and gender matched healthy controls.

    Design: Case-control study.

    Setting: Faculty of Medicine and Odontology/ Pediatric cardiology and Pedodontics, Umeå university, Sweden

    Sample and Methods: All the cases and their controls lived in the county of Västerbotten in northern Sweden. Each group comprised 41 children with a mean age of 6.5 years. Data were collected from medical and dental records. All bitewing radiographs were read separately by one of the authors.

    Results: Children with congenital heart disease had significantly more caries in their primary teeth than the control group. The mean dmfs-value was 5.2 + 7.0 in the cardiac group compared to 2.2 + 3.5 in the control group (p < 0.05). Twenty-six of the children had all four 6-year molars, and their mean DMFS-values were 0.9 + 1.9 in the cardiac group compared to 0.3 + 0.6 in the control group (p > 0.05). The children with congenital heart disease had received more caries prevention based on the use of fluorides than the control group. There was a significant correlation between the number of fluoride varnish treatments and the dmfs value of the child (r = 0.411, p < 0.01). Fifty-two per cent of the children in the cardiac group were prescribed fluoride tablets on one or more occasions compared to 17% in the control group (p < 0.01). Number of month on digoxin medication and the dmfs-value had a significant correlation (r = 0.368, p < 0.05). Ten of the children had been on digoxin medication between 6 and 87 months and they had a mean dmfs-value of 10.1 + 8.5.

    Conclusion: Swedish children with complex congenital heart disease have poorer dental health than healthy age and gender matched controls in spite of intensified preventive efforts. In many cases, intervention had been given when caries were present. A closer cooperation between paediatric cardiology and paediatric dentistry is needed.

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