umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Al-Otaibi, M
    et al.
    Al-Harthy, M
    Gustafsson, A
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Periodontology.
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Angmar-Månsson, B
    Subgingival plaque microbiota in Saudi Arabians after use of miswak chewing stick and toothbrush2004In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 1048-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The chewing stick, the miswak, is used in many developing countries as the traditional means for oral hygiene. It is prepared from the roots, twigs and stem of Salvadora persica or other alternative local plants. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of the chewing stick miswak (from S. persica) and toothbrush on subgingival plaque microflora among Saudi Arabian individuals. Further, to investigate whether components extracted from S. persica may interfere with the subgingival plaque micro-organisms. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifteen healthy Saudi Arabian male volunteers aged 21-36 years were included in a single-blind, randomized cross-over study. The participants were taught how to use each device properly. Plaque sampling for DNA test was performed at the baseline, 1 week after professional tooth cleaning, and after 3 weeks of either miswak or toothbrush use. Identification and quantification of microbial species were performed by the checkerboard method, using whole genomic, digoxigenin-labelled DNA probes. Inhibition zones around miswak were examined on agar plates with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and the leukotoxicity of this bacterium was analyzed in a bioassay with macrophages+/-extracts of miswak. RESULTS: Miswak and toothbrushing had a similar influence on the levels of the subgingival microbiota. However, A. actinomycetemcomitans was significantly more reduced by miswak (p<0.05) than by toothbrushing. These results were supported by our in vitro results which, indicated that extracts from S. persica might interfere with the growth and leukotoxicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to toothbrush use, miswak use significantly reduced the amount of A. actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival plaque.

  • 2. Buhlin, Kare
    et al.
    Holmer, Jacob
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Hörkkö, Sohvi
    Pockley, Alan Graham
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Paju, Susanna
    Klinge, Björn
    Pussinen, Pirkko
    Association of periodontitis with persistent, pro-atherogenic antibody responses2015In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 1006-1014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To study antibody responses associated with molecular mimicry in periodontitis.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-four periodontitis cases (mean age 54.0 years) and 44 controls (53.6 years) were examined, after which cases received periodontal treatment. Established immunoassays were used to analyse levels of antibodies against two pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), heat shock proteins (Hsp), Hsp60, Hsp65, and Hsp70, and epitopes of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) (CuOx-LDL and MDA-LDL) in plasma samples that were collected at baseline, after 3 (n=48) and 6 (n=30) months.

    RESULTS: When age, sex, smoking habit, and the number of teeth were considered in multivariate logistic regressions, Aa and Pg IgG, Hsp65-IgA, CuOx-LDL-IgG and -IgM and MDA-LDL-IgG antibody levels were associated with periodontitis, whereas Hsp60-IgG2 antibody levels were inversely associated. The Aa antibody levels significantly correlated with the levels of IgA antibodies to Hsp65 and Hsp70, and both OxLDL IgA-antibody levels. The levels of antibodies to Pg correlated with IgG antibodies to Hsp60, Hsp70 and both oxLDL antibody epitopes. None of the antibody levels changed significantly after treatment.

    CONCLUSIONS: Periodontitis is associated with persistently high levels of circulating antibodies that are reactive with pathogen- and host-derived antigens.

  • 3.
    Claesson, Rolf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lagervall, Maria
    Department of Periodontology at Skanstull, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Höglund-Åberg, Carola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Haubek, Dorte
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Detection of the highly leucotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in members of a Caucasian family living in Sweden2011In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Carriers of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans exhibit an enhanced risk for developing aggressive periodontitis compared with individuals carrying non-JP2 clones. While the JP2 clone is almost exclusively detected among adolescents of African descent, reports on Caucasians colonized with the JP2 clone are remarkably few.

    Objective: The aim of this paper is to report on the history of periodontal disease and microbiological findings in a Caucasian family.

    Material and Methods: A. actinomycetemcomitans and other periodontitis-associated bacterial species in subgingival plaque samples were quantified by conventional culture technique. Leucotoxin promoter typing, serotyping and further characterizations of A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates were performed by PCR. DNA sequencing of the pseudogene, hbpA was performed to determine the origin of the detected JP2 clones. Further, genetically ancestry testing of family members was carried out.

    Results: The JP2 clone was detected in samples from two of the family members, a 33-year-old daughter and her 62-year-old mother. Relationship of their JP2 clones with JP2 clone strains from the Mediterranean area of Africa was indicated. Genotyping confirmed the Caucasian origin of all family members.

    Conclusions: Caucasian JP2 carriers exist and older subjects can carry the JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  • 4.
    Esberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Isehed, Catrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Periodontology, Public Dental Health County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle County Hospital, Gävle, Sweden; Center for Clinical Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Holmlund, Anders
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Peri-implant crevicular fluid proteome before and after adjunctive enamel matrix derivative treatment of peri-implantitis2019In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 669-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore which peri‐implant crevicular fluid (PICF) protein pattern is associated with the active peri‐implantitis process.

    Materials and methods: Peri‐implant crevicular fluid from 25 peri‐implantitis sites were subjected to proteomic analysis using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry before and at 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, to identify associations between PICF protein pattern and implant loss, bleeding on probing, pocket depth and enamel matrix derivative (EMD) treatment.

    Results: Clustering of subjects based on their 3–12 months PICF proteomic profiles by principal component analysis defined two major clusters. Cluster 2 differentiated from cluster 3 by 52 proteins (R2 = 90%, Q2 = 80%) and belonging to cluster 2 was associated with implant loss (p = 0.009) and bleeding on probing (p = 0.001). Cluster 3 was associated with implant survival and EMD treatment (p = 0.044).

    Conclusion: Here, we demonstrate that a specific PICF proteomic profile associates with active peri‐implantitis process and implant loss.

  • 5.
    Friskopp, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Periodontology, Public Dental Services, SE-164 42 Kista, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Marie
    AstraZeneca, Clinical R&D, SE-151 85 Södertälje, Sweden.
    Isacsson, Göran
    AstraZeneca, Clinical R&D, SE-151 85 Södertälje, Sweden.
    The anesthetic onset and duration of a new lidocaine/prilocaine gel intra-pocket anesthetic (Oraqix) for periodontal scaling/root planing2001In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 453-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A new non-injection anesthetic, lidocaine/prilocaine gel (Oraqix, AstraZeneca) in a reversible thermosetting system, has been developed to provide local anesthesia for scaling/root planing (SRP). The aim of this study was to determine the anesthetic onset and duration of the gel for SRP in patients with periodontitis.

    METHODS: 30 patients were randomized to either 30 s, 2 min, or 5 min of treatment with the gel prior to SRP of a tooth. The gel was applied to periodontal pockets with a blunt applicator. On completion of the SRP of each tooth (2-3 teeth treated/patient), the patients rated their pain on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS).

    RESULTS: The median VAS pain score was 7.5 mm in the 30-s group, 28.5 mm in the 2-min group, and 15.5 mm in the 5-min group, with a significant difference between the 30-s and 2-min groups (p=0.03). In 2 patients in the 5-min group, but none in the other groups, the SRP was interrupted due to pain. The mean duration of anesthesia measured as pain on probing were 18.1, 17.3, and 19.9 min in the 30-s, 2-min, and 5-min groups, respectively. There were no reports of numbness of the tongue, lip, or cheek, neither were there any adverse local reactions in the oral mucosa. The gel was easy to apply and did not interfere with the SRP procedure.

    CONCLUSION: Oraqix provides anesthesia after an application time of 30 s, with a mean duration of action of about 17 to 20 min.

  • 6. Giannobile, William V.
    et al.
    Berglundh, Tord
    Al-Nawas, Bilal
    Araujo, Mauricio
    Bartold, P. Mark
    Bouchard, Philippe
    Chapple, Iain
    Gruber, Reinhard
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Sculean, Anton
    Lang, Niklaus P.
    Lyngstadaas, Petter
    Kebschull, Moritz
    Galindo-Moreno, Pablo
    Schwartz, Zvi
    Shapira, Lior
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Reseland, Janne
    Biological factors involved in alveolar bone regeneration Consensus report of Working Group 1 of the 15(th) European Workshop on Periodontology on Bone Regeneration2019In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 46, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: To describe the biology of alveolar bone regeneration.

    Material and Methods: Four comprehensive reviews were performed on (a) mesenchymal cells and differentiation factors leading to bone formation; (b) the critical interplay between bone resorbing and formative cells; (c) the role of osteoimmunology in the formation and maintenance of alveolar bone; and (d) the self‐regenerative capacity following bone injury or tooth extraction were prepared prior to the workshop.

    Results and Conclusions: This summary information adds to the fuller understanding of the alveolar bone regenerative response with implications to reconstructive procedures for patient oral rehabilitation. The group collectively formulated and addressed critical questions based on each of the reviews in this consensus report to advance the field. The report concludes with identified areas of future research.

  • 7.
    Grigoriadis, Anastasios
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Roland S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Trulsson, Mats
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Adaptability of mastication in people with implant-supported bridges2011In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 395-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We aimed to determine whether people with implant-supported bridges in both jaws, thus lacking periodontal receptors, adjust jaw muscle activity to food hardness during mastication.

    Materials and Methods: Thirteen participants with implant-supported bridges in both jaws and 13 with natural dentition chewed and swallowed soft and hard gelatine-based model foods, while electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masseter and temporal muscles was recorded bilaterally together with the position of the mandible. Data were compared by using a mixed-design anova model and a P-value<0.05 was considered statistically significant.

    Results: The number of chewing cycles and the duration of the masticatory sequence increased with food hardness in both groups, whereas vertical and lateral amplitude of the jaw movements, and the jaw-opening velocity, increased significantly with food hardness only for the dentate group. Although both groups adapted the EMG activity to the hardness of the food, the implant participants showed a significantly weaker increase in EMG activity with increased food hardness early during the masticatory sequence than the dentate participants did. In addition, the implant group showed significantly less reduction of muscle activity during the progression of the masticatory sequence than the dentate group.

    Conclusions: People with implant-supported bridges show an impaired adaptation of the muscle activity to food hardness during mastication. We suggest that a lack of sensory signals from periodontal mechanoreceptors accounts for the impairment.

  • 8. Holmlund, A
    et al.
    Hänström, L
    Lerner, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Bone resorbing activity and cytokine levels in gingival crevicular fluid before and after treatment of periodontal disease.2004In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 475-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to investigate bone resorption activity (BRA), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in sites with no signs of periodontal disease and in sites with horizontal or angular loss of periodontal bone. These assessments were performed before and after periodontal treatment. METHODS: GCFs were collected from 10 individuals with filter strips from two healthy sites and four sites with deep pathological periodontal pockets, two of which showed horizontal bone loss and two with angular bone loss. All diseased pockets were treated with flap surgery and systemic Doxyferm. Twelve months later GCF was collected again and treatment outcome evaluated. BRA in GCFs was assessed in a bone organ culture system by following the release of (45)Ca from neonatal mouse calvariae. The amounts of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-1ra in GCFs were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RESULTS: Treatment resulted in reduction of pocket depths with 3.5+/-0.5 mm in sites with angular bone loss and 2.8+/-0.3 mm in sites with horizontal bone loss. Initially, BRA, IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-1ra were significantly higher in GCFs from diseased sites compared with healthy sites. No differences in BRA and cytokine levels were seen between GCFs from pockets with horizontal and angular bone losses. The levels of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-1ra were significantly reduced after treatment of diseased pockets. Pocket depths were significantly correlated to BRA only in pre-treatment sites with angular bone loss. BRA was correlated to Il-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, but not to IL-1ra, in diseased sites with angular bone loss, before and after treatment. The reductions of BRA in the individual sites, seen after treatment, were not correlated to the reductions of Il-1 alpha, IL-1 beta or IL-1ra. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that BRA and cytokine levels are increased in GCFs from sites with periodontal disease and that periodontal treatment results in reduction of the cytokines. Our findings further indicate that IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta play important roles for the BRA present in GCFs, but that other factors also contribute to this activity.

  • 9.
    Höglund Åberg, Carola
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kwamin, Francis
    Ghana University.
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Dahlén, Gunnar
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Haubek, Dorte
    Århus Universitet, Danmark.
    Progression of attachment loss is strongly associated with presence of the JP2 genotype of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: a prospective cohort study of a young adolescent population2014In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 232-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To assess the progression of attachment loss (AL) during a two-year period according to the presence of JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans in a Ghanaian adolescent population.

    METHODS: A total of 500 adolescents (mean age 13.2 years, SD± 1.5) were enrolled in the study. After two years, 397 (79.4%) returned for a periodontal re-examination, including the measurement of AL. The carrier status of the JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans was evaluated in a baseline examination two years earlier.

    RESULTS: Individuals who carried the JP2 genotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans had a significantly increased risk (relative risk (RR) = 7.3) of developing AL ≥ 3 mm. The mean AL at the follow-up and the mean two-year progression of AL was significantly higher in the JP2 genotype-positive group (n=38) compared with the group positive for the non-JP2 genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans (n=169), and the group of A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative individuals (n=190). The JP2 genotype was strongly associated with the progression of AL ≥ 3 mm (OR= 14.3). The non-JP2 genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans were also, however less pronounced, associated with the progression of AL ≥ 3 mm (OR=3.4).

    CONCLUSION: The JP2 genotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans is strongly associated with the progression of AL.

  • 10.
    Isehed, Catrine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Periodontology, Gävle County Hospital, Gävle, Sweden; Center for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Holmlund, Anders
    Renvert, Stefan
    Svenson, Bjorn
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Effectiveness of enamel matrix derivative on the clinical and microbiological outcomes following surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis: A randomized controlled trial2016In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 863-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This randomized clinical trial aimed at comparing radiological, clinical and microbial effects of surgical treatment of peri-implantitis alone or in combination with enamel matrix derivative (EMD).

    Methods: Twenty-six subjects were treated with open flap debridement and decontamination of the implant surfaces with gauze and saline preceding adjunctive EMD or no EMD. Bone level (BL) change was primary outcome and secondary outcomes were changes in pocket depth (PD), plaque, pus, bleeding and the microbiota of the peri-implant biofilm analyzed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray over a time period of 12 months.

    Results: In multivariate modelling, increased marginal BL at implant site was significantly associated with EMD, the number of osseous walls in the peri-implant bone defect and a Gram+/aerobic microbial flora, whereas reduced BL was associated with a Gram-/anaerobic microbial flora and presence of bleeding and pus, with a cross-validated predictive capacity (Q(2)) of 36.4%. Similar, but statistically non-significant, trends were seen for BL, PD, plaque, pus and bleeding in univariate analysis.

    Conclusion: Adjunctive EMD to surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was associated with prevalence of Gram+/aerobic bacteria during the follow-up period and increased marginal BL 12 months after treatment.

  • 11.
    Isehed, Catrine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Periodontology, Public Dental Health County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle County Hospital, Gävle, Sweden; Center for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Svenson, Björn
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Holmlund, Anders
    Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis using enamel matrix derivative, an RCT: 3-and 5-year follow-up2018In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 744-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes 3 and 5years after the surgical treatment of peri-implantitis per se or in combination with an enamel matrix derivative (EMD).

    Materials and Methods: At baseline, 29 patients were randomized to surgical treatment with adjunctive EMD or no EMD. One year after the surgical treatment of peri-implantitis, 25 patients remained eligible for survival analyses at the 3- and 5-year follow-up. The primary outcomes were implant loss and bone level (BL) change measured on radiographs, and the secondary outcomes, bleeding on probing, pus and plaque at each implant were analysed in 18 and 14 patients at the 3- and 5-year follow-up, respectively.

    Results: After exclusion of four patients who discontinued the study, at the 3-year follow-up, 13 (100%) implants survived in the EMD group, and 10 of 12 (83%) in the non-EMD group. At the 5-year follow-up, 11 of 13 (85%) implants in the EMD group and nine of 12 (75%) in the non-EMD group survived. In multivariate modelling, BL changes and EMD treatment were positively associated with implant survival. Similarly, the same trend was seen in univariate analysis.

    Conclusions: An exploratory analysis suggests that adjunctive EMD is positively associated with implant survival up to 5 years, but larger studies are needed.

  • 12.
    Jensen, Anne B.
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Haubek, Dorte
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility testing of a large collection of clinical strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans does not identify resistance to amoxicillin2019In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 846-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The present study aims to determine the susceptibility of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans to amoxicillin by investigating a large collection of oral strains of diverse geographical origin.

    METHODS: Two hundred and fifty-seven A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were serotyped using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of amoxicillin were determined using the agar dilution method (range 0.25 to 8.0 mg/L). The plates were spot-wise inoculated with approximately 104 colony-forming units, incubated in 5% CO2 at 37 C°, and visually inspected after 24 and 48 hours. A MIC ≤ 2.00 mg/L was categorised as susceptible using EUCAST interpretative criteria for Haemophilus species.

    RESULTS: Amoxicillin MIC-values varied from 0.25 mg/L to 2.00 mg/L, and all tested strains, including strains previously reported as resistant, were susceptible to amoxicillin. The MIC50 was 1.00 mg/L and the MIC90 was 2.00 mg/L.

    CONCLUSION: Meticulous investigation of strains including isolates previously reported as resistant could not confirm the emergence of resistance to β-lactams in A. actinomycetemcomitans. Based on the present in vitro results, amoxicillin can be considered a key oral antimicrobial agent for treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 13. Kapferer-Seebacher, Ines
    et al.
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Malfait, Franziska
    Zschocke, Johannes
    Periodontal manifestations of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes: a systematic review2017In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 1088-1100Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of inherited connective tissue disorders, characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Periodontal EDS (pEDS) is a specific EDS subtype caused by heterozygous mutations in complement 1 subunit genes C1R and C1S, with early severe periodontitis as predominant clinical feature. We aimed to systematically assess the spectrum of periodontal abnormalities in all EDS subtypes.

    Materials and Methods: An electronic and manual search was conducted in three databases (Medline, LIVIVO, CENTRAL). Publications of all study designs written in English/German without date restriction evaluating periodontal features in EDS were included.

    Results: Thirty articles on pEDS and thirteen articles on other EDS subtypes were analysed. In pEDS, early severe periodontitis (98.4%) and gingival recession (87.1%) are the predominant features. Reports on periodontal manifestations in other EDS subtypes are rare. Described were severe gingival enlargement in dermatosparaxis EDS, and localized periodontal breakdown related to teeth with shortened roots in classical EDS (n=3, respectively).

    Conclusion: Early severe periodontitis is the hallmark of pEDS; there is no evidence that it is part of the clinical phenotype of other EDS subtypes. Stringent analyses of periodontal manifestations in most EDS subtypes are missing. Prospero registration number CRD42017056889.

  • 14.
    Konradsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Dental Hygiene.
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    van Dijken, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Dental Hygiene.
    Dental biofilm, gingivitis and interleukin-1 adjacent to approximal sites of a bonded ceramic.2007In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 1062-1067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the influence of aged, resin-bonded, ceramic restorations on approximal dental biofilm formation and gingival inflammatory response, associated with and without customary oral hygiene. Material and Methods: In a cross-sectional and in a 10-day experimental gingivitis study, Quigley-Hein plaque index, gingival index (GI), crevicular fluid and its levels of interleukin (IL)-1alpha, -1beta and receptor antagonist were measured at appoximal surfaces of leucite-reinforced bonded ceramic coverages, resin composite restorations and enamel and compared intra-individually in 17 participants. Results: No differences were found between the ceramic, composite and enamel regarding plaque index, GI, levels of IL-1alpha, -1beta and the receptor antagonist. Throughout, higher crevicular fluid amounts were observed at ceramic sites compared with the enamel (p<0.05). In the experimental gingivitis, plaque index, GI, crevicular fluid and its IL-1alpha levels increased significantly. Conclusion: The need for optimal oral hygiene and professional preventive oral health care does not seem to be reduced with regard to approximal surfaces of aged, resin-bonded, leucite-reinforced ceramic restorations in comparison with those of a hybrid, resin composite and enamel.

  • 15.
    Konradsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    van Dijken, Jan
    Umeå University.
    Interleukin-1 levels in gingival crevicular fluid adjacent to restorations of calcium aluminate cement and resin composite.2005In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 462-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this clinical study was to intra-individually compare Class V restorations of a calcium aluminate cement (CAC), resin composite and enamel with respect to the adjacent levels of interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-1beta and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). The hypothesis was that there are higher IL-1 levels adjacent to resin composite, compared with CAC and enamel. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 15 subjects, at least one set of two Class V restorations with subgingival margins, one CAC and one universal hybrid resin composite, and one control surface of enamel were included. In a cross-sectional study and on days 0, 3 and 7 of an experimental gingivitis study, GCFs were collected with Periopaper for 30 s. The GCF concentrations of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta and IL-1ra were quantified with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Neither the cross-sectional study nor the experimental gingivitis study showed any significant differences in the levels of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta and IL-1ra between CAC, resin composite and enamel sites (p>0.05). In the cross-sectional study, low IL-1 concentrations were observed. The IL-1 levels increased significantly during the experimental gingivitis. CONCLUSION: Regardless of CAC or resin composite, the restorations per se did not affect the GCF levels of IL-1 and IL-1ra, neither at healthy gingiva, nor at initiation of plaque-related gingival inflammation.

  • 16.
    Lerner, Ulf H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research at Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kindstedt, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    The critical interplay between bone resorbing and bone forming cells2019In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 46, p. 33-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: In this article, the interplay between bone resorbing and bone forming cells is reviewed.

    Method: This review examines the comprehensive literature on the interaction between bone resorption and bone formation.

    Results: Coupling between bone resorption and bone formation refers to the process within basic multicellular units, in which osteoclastic bone resorption is met by the differentiation of osteoblasts and their bone forming activity. There are many possible signalling molecules that contribute to coupling at the asynchronously working remodelling sites throughout our skeleton. These include growth factors released from the bone matrix during bone resorption, soluble and membrane products of the osteoclasts and their precursors and signals from osteocytes.

    Conclusions: In this review, we describe the potential roles of a number of these factors, whose interactions are essential for a tight control of coupling within individual remodelling units, in order to control skeletal mass. Both pre‐clinical evidence and clinical evidence pinpoint that molecules in the WNT signalling pathway could be promising bone augmentation therapeutic targets. Regarding oral implications, there is support, from preclinical studies in rats, that anti‐sclerostin antibodies can restore alveolar bone mass.

  • 17. Lundgren, T
    et al.
    Twetman, Svante
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Cariology.
    Crossner, CG
    Birkhed, D
    Saliva composition in children and young adults with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome.1996In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 1068-1072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the salivary secretion rate and composition in a group of 16 children and young adults (6-27 years) with Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome (PLS), and to compare the findings with a group (n = 16) of healthy controls. Unstimulated and stimulated whole saliva was collected at least 2 h after meals and the secretion rate determined. The stimulated saliva was assessed for buffer capacity, total protein, peroxidase and hexosamine, while the unstimulated samples were evaluated for total protein, lysozyme, thiocyanate, lactoferrin and salivary IgA. Both the unstimulated (p < 0.01) and stimulated (p < 0.05) saliva secretion rates were significantly lower among the PLS patients compared with the controls. Furthermore salivary buffer capacity was significantly (p < 0.01) lower in the PLS patients. The total protein content in saliva was comparatively high in the study group, while the concentrations of immunoglobulins and non-immunoglobulins were within normal ranges. When calculating the output of the assessed antimicrobial factors, the mean peroxidase level in stimulated whole saliva was found to be significantly (p < 0.01) lower in the PLS patients than in the healthy controls. In conclusion, the present study indicates an impaired water secretion and a somewhat altered saliva gland function in children and young adults with PLS.

  • 18. Patomella, Lena
    et al.
    Nyström Hagfors, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Norderyd, Ola
    PR156 – Dietary intake in relation to oral health in adults with severe periodontitis2018In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 45, no S19, p. 172-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aim: Periodontitis is a chronic disease which can result in progressive loss of the teeth's supportive tissue. About 40% of the world's population is affected by periodontitis of which approximately 10% have a severe form. Periodontitis can affect the dietary intake for diseased individuals due to mobile teeth that making it painful to eat or by missing teeth. The aim of the study was to investigate self-assessed oral health in relation to dietary intake in adult individuals with severe periodontitis treated in specialist-dental care. The aim was also to study self-assessed oral health and dietary intake in relation to the number of teeth, age and sex.

    Methods: The study was a cross-sectional study including 62 participants. The material was collected via questionnaires regarding background and the areas of oral health and dietary intake. Participants were recruited via a special-dental care clinic in Sweden during September 2017. Referred patients diagnosed with severe periodontitis were invited to participate in the study and the participation was confidential. Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test and Mann Whitney U test were used. Alpha was set at p<0.05.

    Results: Half of the participants reported that their oral health condition constituted an obstacle to eating the foods they wanted. Participants who had ≥20 teeth ate fruits and berries, red meat, fish and poultry more often than participants with fewer teeth. Participants with ≤19 teeth assessed their chewing and biting ability as poorer than individuals with ≥20 teeth.

    Conclusion: The result shows that a large proportion of the participants with periodontitis experience that their oral health affects dietary intake . Multidisciplinary collaboration between dental care and dietitian clinic could increase the ability to prevent and/or treat further ill-health in individuals with periodontitis that adversely affects the energy and nutritional intake due to oral health condition.

    Disclosure: No significant relationships.

  • 19. Tanner, Anne C R
    et al.
    Kent, Ralph
    Kanasi, Eleni
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Lu, Shulin C
    Paster, Bruce J
    Sonis, Steven T
    Murray, Lora A
    Van Dyke, Thomas E
    Clinical characteristics and microbiota of progressing slight chronic periodontitis in adults.2007In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 917-930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study sought clinical and microbial risk indicators for progressing slight periodontitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and seventeen periodontally healthy or slight periodontitis adults (20-40 years) were monitored clinically at 6-month intervals followed by supragingival cleaning. Inter-proximal sites with >1.5 mm increase in clinical attachment over 18 months were considered disease active. Subgingival plaque was analysed by 78 16S rDNA and 38 whole-genomic DNA probes and by PCR to Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia. Characteristics were compared between active and inactive subjects. RESULTS: Twenty-two subjects showed disease activity principally at molars. Mean baseline gingival and plaque indices, bleeding on probing, probing depth and clinical attachment level (CAL) were higher in active subjects. DNA probes detected species and not-yet-cultivated phylotypes from chronic periodontitis, although few species were associated with active subjects. By PCR P. gingivalis (p=0.007) and T. forsythia (p=0.075) were detected more frequently during monitoring in active subjects. Stepwise logistic analysis associated baseline levels of gingival index, clinical attachment and bleeding with subsequent clinical attachment loss. CONCLUSIONS: Gingivitis and CAL were significantly associated with progressing slight periodontitis in 20--40-year-old adults. Species associated with moderate and advanced chronic periodontitis were detected in slight periodontitis.

  • 20.
    Ullbro, Christer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kinnby, Bertil
    Lindberg, Pia
    Matsson, Lars
    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and placental plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-2) in gingival crevicular fluid from patients with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome2004In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 708-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Numerous patients with Papillon–Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) express a severe periodontal inflammation that results in premature loss of deciduous and permanent teeth. The plasminogen activating (PA) system is involved in physiological and pathological processes including epithelial healing, extracellular proteolysis and local inflammatory reactions. The aim of the study was to explore a possible role of the PA system in patients with PLS.

    Material and Methods: Samples of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were collected from areas with gingival infection in 20 patients with PLS and in 20 healthy controls. The concentration of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and inhibitor (PAI-2) was measured with ELISA.

    Results: The median level of PAI-2 was significantly higher (p<0.01) in PLS patients than in the controls, while the median value of t-PA did not differ between the groups. No difference in t-PA or PAI-2 levels was found regarding age, gender or presence of active periodontal disease.

    Conclusion: The findings indicate an atypical activity of the PA system with a disturbed epithelial function in PLS patients, suggesting that the periodontal destruction seen in patients with PLS is secondary to a hereditary defect in the defense system.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf