umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Becker, William
    et al.
    Sennerby, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Gothenburg.
    Bedrossian, Edwin
    Becker, Burton E
    Lucchini, Jean Pierre
    Implant stability measurements for implants placed at the time of extraction: a cohort, prospective clinical trial2005In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 391-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies indicate that implants placed at the time of extraction have high success rates. Implants must be stable at the time of insertion. Presently there are no data indicating the degree of implant stability when implants are placed at the time of extraction. This study evaluated changes in stability of implants from implant placement to abutment connection utilizing resonance frequency analysis (RFA). The unit of measurement was the international stability quotient (ISQ).

    Methods: Prior to treatment, patients were given medical history and dental evaluations. Periapical and panogram radiographs were taken. Fifty-two patients requiring extraction of one or two teeth and implant placement immediately after extraction were enrolled in this study. Under conscious sedation and local anesthesia or local anesthesia alone, teeth were atraumatically removed and the extraction sockets were debrided. A total of 73 dental implants (57 in the maxilla, 16 in the mandible) were placed. Using a one-stage approach, all implants were placed within the patient's alveolar envelope and were never placed directly into extraction sockets. All implants were placed into contained extraction sites. Bone augmentation procedures were not performed. After implant insertion, the RFA electronic transducer was attached to the head of the implant with the retaining screw. The device was attached to a computer designed to register RFA scores in ISQ units. RFA measurements were taken at implant placement and abutment connection. Bone qualities, quantity, implant length and width as well as site of placement were recorded.

    Results: The average interval between implant insertion and abutment connection was 5.6 months (SD 2.05). Two implants were lost between implant insertion and 1 year. At 2 to 3 years, the cumulative survival was 97.2%. Resonance frequency measurements at implant placement showed a mean primary stability of 62.0 (SE 1.1; range 43 to 83 ISQ) and a mean secondary stability after 1 year of 64.0 (SE 1.2; range 40 to 98 ISQ) for all implants. The increase was marginally significant (generalized estimating equation z-statistic = 1.79; P value = 0.07).

    Conclusions: Implants placed at the time of extraction and inserted into native bone and not directly into extractions sockets have a high degree of initial stability as evidenced by RFA measurements. Implants with initial high ISQ levels revealed a slight drop in levels over time, while implants with levels lower than 60 had increases in levels between implant insertion and abutment connection. At 2 to 3 years the cumulative survival rate was 97.2%.

  • 2. Carlsson, G
    et al.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Periodontology.
    Olsson, A
    Eriksson, T
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Hänström, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Henter, JI
    Periodontal disease in patients from the original Kostmann family with severe congenital neutropenia2006In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 744-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with Kostmann syndrome (severe congenital neutropenia [SCN]) typically normalize their absolute neutrophil count (ANC) upon granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy. However, although they no longer experience life-threatening bacterial infections, they frequently still have recurrent gingivitis and even severe periodontitis, often starting in early childhood. METHODS: We studied the periodontal disease in the four surviving patients belonging to the family originally described by Kostmann. Their odontological records, x-rays, color photos, bacterial cultures, serum antibodies to oral bacteria, and histopathological examinations were reviewed. The data were also correlated to previous investigations on their antibacterial peptides and molecular biology. RESULTS: Three patients had periodontal disease, despite normal ANC and professional dental care, and had neutrophils deficient in antibacterial peptides. One of these patients also had a heterozygous mutation in the neutrophil elastase gene, had severe periodontal disease and overgrowth of the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in the dental flora, and 15 permanent teeth had been extracted by the age of 27. One bone marrow-transplanted patient had no periodontal disease. CONCLUSIONS: Normalized ANC levels are not sufficient to maintain normal oral health in SCN patients, and because neutrophils are important for first-line defense and innate immunity, the deficiency of the antibacterial peptide LL-37 probably explains their chronic periodontal disease. Professional dental care is still important for SCN patients, despite treatment with G-CSF and normal ANC levels. Whether antibacterial peptides play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis in other patients remains to be elucidated.

  • 3. Dogan, B
    et al.
    Antinheimo, J
    Cetiner, D
    Bodur, A
    Emingil, G
    Buduneli, E
    Uygur, C
    Firatli, E
    Lakio, L
    Asikainen, Sirkka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Subgingival microflora in Turkish patients with periodontitis.2003In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 803-814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: No information exists on periodontitis-associated subgingival microbiota from Turkey. We determined the occurrence, interspecies relationships, and clonal characteristics for a group of periodontal bacteria in a Turkish study population. METHODS: Subgingival microbial samples were obtained from patients with localized (LAgP, N = 18) or generalized (GAgP, N = 17) types of aggressive periodontitis, generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP, N = 14), and non-periodontitis subjects (N = 20). Culture methods were used to recover 6 periodontal bacterial species and yeasts, and a polymerase chain reaction technique was used to detect Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Intraspecies characterization of A. actinomycetemcomitans was carried out by serotyping and genotyping. RESULTS: All species, except for Micromonas micros (formerly Peptostreptococcus micros) occurred more frequently (P < 0.05) in periodontitis than non-periodontitis subjects. Detection frequencies for Tannerella forsythensis (formerly Bacteroides forsythus) and Campylobacter rectus differed among the periodontitis subgroups; the lowest frequency occurred in LAgP. The mean proportions of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and C. rectus were higher (P < 0.008) in GAgP than in non-periodontitis subjects. Significant positive associations were seen between 7 of the 22 possible combinations (P < 0.05). A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype c (34%) and non-serotypeable isolates (34%) were the most common antigenic types among the 305 strains analyzed. Eleven arbitrarily primed (AP)-PCR genotypes were distinguished among 273 isolates from 29 subjects. Yeasts were found in 23% of the 69 subjects. CONCLUSIONS: The results on the Turkish study population were generally in line with earlier reports on the occurrence and interspecies relationships of certain bacteria in periodontitis. However, A. actinomycetemcomitans was not overrepresented in LAgP, and the serotype distribution resembled that reported from the East. The high frequency of non-serotypeable isolates suggests local characteristics of the species.

  • 4. Dogan, B
    et al.
    Buduneli, E
    Emingil, G
    Atilla, G
    Akilli, A
    Antinheimo, J
    Lakio, L
    Asikainen, Sirkka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Characteristics of periodontal microflora in acute myocardial infarction.2005In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 740-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Periodontitis has been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Systemic reactions associated with cardiovascular events may depend on characteristics of the subgingival microflora in periodontitis. Our objectives were to compare the numbers of cultivable bacteria, composition of subgingival microflora and clonal distribution of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) in two groups of patients with generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP), one with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI-GCP) and the other one without AMI (non-AMI-GCP). METHODS: In all, 150 dentate individuals were screened for suitability to this study. Subgingival bacterial samples were collected from 11 AMI-GCP and 11 non-AMI-GCP patients who had been selected using strict inclusion criteria in an attempt to exclude confounding factors and to increase comparability of periodontal conditions by matching for periodontal probing depths and attachment levels. Culture methods were used to determine the total viable counts and occurrence and proportions of six periodontal bacterial species and yeasts. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect A. actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). Intraspecies characterization of A. actinomycetemcomitans included serotyping and genotyping. RESULTS: The mean proportions of P. gingivalis (P = 0.05) and Tannerella forsythensis (T. forsythensis) (P = 0.01) were significantly lower, but the numbers of Micromonas micros (M. micros) and A. actinomycetemcomitans were up to nine times higher and the mean total number of cultivable bacteria per sample higher (P <0.01) in AMI-GCP than in non-AMI-GCP. CONCLUSION: The findings that no target subgingival species were overrepresented but the total bacterial number was higher in AMI-GCP than non-AMI-GCP patients may provide support to the hypothesis that elevated numbers of bacteria in close vicinity to sterile parenteral area present a risk for systemic health.

  • 5.
    Höglund Åberg, Carola
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Molecular Periodontology.
    Kwamin, Francis
    Univ Ghana, Sch Dent, Accra, Ghana.
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Molecular Periodontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Haubek, Dorte
    Århus Univ, Dept Dent, Århus, Denmark.
    Presence of JP2 and Non-JP2 genotypes of aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and periodontal attachment loss in adolescents in Ghana2012In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 83, no 12, p. 1520-1528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Limited data are reported concerning the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans and attachment loss (AL) in sub-Saharan countries. The authors investigate the carrier frequency of JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans and the presence of AL in Ghanaian adolescents and evaluate socioeconomic conditions and oral hygiene practices. Methods: Five hundred individuals (mean +/- SD age: 13.2 +/- 1.5 years) in public and private schools were interviewed about demographic characteristics and oral hygiene practices and were given a full-mouth periodontal examination. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from periodontal sites around permanent first molars and incisors. The carrier status of A. actinomycetemcomitans at the individual level was determined based on results obtained by cultivation and polymerase chain reaction. Results: The findings of this study show a relatively high carrier rate of JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the Ghanaian adolescent population and the presence of this bacterium is associated with the occurrence of AL. The overall carrier rate of A. actinomycetemcomitans was 54.4%, and the highly leukotoxic JP2 genotype was detected in 8.8% of the study population. A total of 107 (21.4%) individuals had >= 1 tooth with AL >= 3 mm. The majority of the individuals carrying A. actinomycetemcomitans (80.1%) (P<0.001) and of the periodontally diseased individuals (91.6%) (P<0.001) were found in public schools. Conclusions: A. actinomycetemcomitans and AL were frequently found in Ghanaian adolescents. The school type was the strongest predictor of both presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans and AL.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Buhlin, Kåre
    Sorsa, Timo
    Pussinen, Pirkko J
    Systemic Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemccomitans Leukotoxin-Neutralizing Antibodies in Periodontitis2017In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 122-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The leukotoxin expressed by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a powerful exotoxin, which can cause imbalance in the host response. Immunoreactivity to the leukotoxin is a marker for the presence of leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitan, a presence that may modify the disease pattern of the colonized individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of systemic immunoreactivity to A. actionmycetemcomitans leukotoxin in relation to clinical and inflammatory findings in individuals with or without periodontitis (n = 88).

    METHODS: The periodontal status was examined in a population of cases (n = 49) and controls (n = 39), and the cases received periodontal treatment. Systemic biomarkers associated with inflammation and infections, as well as the clinical parameters, were analyzed at baseline, three months after treatment and six months after.

    RESULTS: The presence of immunoreactivity against leukotoxin was associated with impaired remission of the disease after periodontal treatment. This immunoreactivity was also significantly associated with increased systemic levels of A. actinomycetemcomtans-specific immunoglobulins and increasing age.

    CONCLUSION: The presence and levels of systemic immunoreactivity against A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin are associated with a decreased remission after otherwise successful periodontal treatment.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Anders S
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Svensson, Krister G
    Trulsson, Mats
    Impaired masticatory behavior in subjects with reduced periodontal tissue support.2006In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 77, no 9, p. 1491-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mechanoreceptors situated in the periodontal ligament provide detailed information about intensive and spatial aspects of tooth loads, which support the neural control of masticatory forces. We asked whether a reduced periodontal ligament due to periodontitis, and, thus, an altered mechanoreceptive innervation of the teeth, would affect masticatory behavior when subjects used incisors to hold and split food. METHODS: We tested 11 subjects with reduced periodontal tissue support that rendered 30% to 70% alveolar bone loss for at least one pair of opposing anterior incisors. Forces were recorded when subjects used their affected incisors to hold half of a peanut for approximately 4 seconds and then split it. Age- and gender-matched healthy subjects served as the control group. None of the participants showed acute oral symptoms or massive periodontal inflammation. RESULTS: The test group used greater force when holding food between the teeth (1.1+/-0.4 N [ mean+/-1 SD]) compared to the control group (0.4+/-0.2 N). Hold forces used by subjects in the test group were also more variable, both within and between trials. The increase in bite force applied to split the peanut was slower and more hesitant for subjects in the test group compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced periodontal tissue support accompanies impaired regulation of masticatory forces. Faulty mechanoreceptive innervation of the periodontal ligament explains the elevated hold force, whereas a change in biting strategy due to the weakened support of the teeth may account for the more defensive food-splitting behavior.

  • 8.
    Kindstedt, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Holm, Cecilia Koskinen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Palmqvist, Py
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Sjöström, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Innate lymphoid cells are present in gingivitis and periodontitis2019In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 200-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are the most recently identified leukocytes of the immune system and these cells are increasingly acknowledged to play important roles in host defence and tissue repair. ILCs are also contributors of inflammatory diseases such as asthma and colitis. We analyzed the presence and relative proportions of the different ILC subsets (ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3) in gingivitis and periodontitis. Further, we investigated if ILCs express receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), a cytokine crucial for osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption.

    METHODS: We collected gingivitis and periodontitis soft tissue and characterized ILC subsets including RANKL expression in single-cell suspensions using flow cytometry.

    RESULTS: ILCs were detected both in gingivitis and periodontitis. The majority of ILCs, in both conditions, were ILC1s. Furthermore, RANKL expression was detected on a fraction of the ILC1s.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our discovery of the presence of ILCs both in gingivitis and periodontitis and concomitant expression of RANKL on a fraction of the ILC1 population suggest that these cells may be of importance in periodontal disease. In addition, our findings provide a new insight into the field of oral immunology.

  • 9. Miranda, LA
    et al.
    Fischer, RG
    Sztajnbok, FR
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Periodontology.
    Figueredo, CMS
    Gustafsson, A
    Increased interleukin-18 in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and early attachment loss2005In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 75-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have been shown to have incipient attachment loss (AL) more frequently than systemically healthy individuals. This study investigated neutrophil activity and proinflammatory cytokines in these patients and aged-matched controls. METHODS: Elastase activity, measured with a low molecular weight substrate (S-2484), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were analyzed in the gingival fluid of 38 patients with JIA and 29 controls. IL-1beta and interleukin-18 (IL-18) were measured with ELISA in the serum of the same groups. Subgingival plaque was analyzed by DNA probes to detect 12 bacteria. RESULTS: Significantly elevated serum levels of IL-1beta and IL-18 were found in the JIA group. No differences were found in the gingival fluid levels of elastase and IL-1beta between groups, or in the frequency of subjects positive to most of the bacteria analyzed, except F. nucleatum, C. rectus, P. micros, and S. intermedius, which were significantly more frequent in the control group. When the JIA group was subdivided according to the presence/absence of AL, IL-18 was significantly increased in the JIA subgroup with AL compared to those without it. There were no differences in the subgingival microbiota between the subgroups. CONCLUSION: The findings of increased serum IL-18 and IL-1beta in patients with JIA accompanied by a similar subgingival microbiota suggest that the increased frequency of incipient attachment loss observed in these patients might be due to their altered systemic inflammatory response, making them more susceptible to periodontal disease.

  • 10. Sofrata, Abier H
    et al.
    Claesson, Rolf L K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Lingström, Peter K
    Gustafsson, Anders K
    Strong antibacterial effect of miswak against oral microorganisms associated with periodontitis and caries.2008In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 79, no 8, p. 1474-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The chewing stick (miswak) is used for oral hygiene in many parts of the world. In addition to the mechanical removal of plaque, an antibacterial effect has been postulated; however, tests of miswak extract from Salvadora persica (Arak) disclosed only low to moderate antibacterial effects. This may be attributable to the extraction process. Our aim was to test in vitro the antibacterial effect of miswak pieces, without extraction, on bacteria implicated in the etiology of periodontitis and caries. METHODS: Miswak pieces were standardized by size and weight (0.07 and 0.14 g) and tested against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), Porphyromonas gingivalis, and, as a reference, Haemophilus influenzae. The miswak pieces were tested in two ways: embedded in the agar plate or suspended above the agar plate. RESULTS: The inhibitory effect was most pronounced on P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and H. influenzae, less on S. mutans, and least on L. acidophilus. Suspended miswak had comparable or stronger effects than miswak embedded in agar. The 0.14-g suspended miswak exhibited significantly greater inhibition on A. actinomycetemcomitans and H. influenzae than the 0.14-g miswak embedded in agar (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Miswak embedded in agar or suspended above the agar plate had strong antibacterial effects against all bacteria tested. The antibacterial effect of suspended miswak pieces suggests the presence of volatile active antibacterial compounds.

  • 11. Yang, HW
    et al.
    Asikainen, Sirkka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Dogan, B
    Suda, R
    Lai, CH
    Relationship of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b to aggressive periodontitis: frequency in pure cultured isolates2004In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 592-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, the association of the five serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) to the new diagnostic classification scheme defined by the American Academy of Periodontology in 1999 has not yet been described. The goal of this study was to characterize the frequencies of the five serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans in A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from various forms of periodontitis using both old and new diagnostic classifications and to determine the relationships between serotype and age and clinical diagnosis. METHODS: A total of 345 A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from 115 A. actinomycetemcomitans culture-positive subjects (mean age 38.0 +/- 18.3 years, 59% female) were collected. Based on the new classifications, 33 subjects had aggressive periodontitis and 82 chronic periodontitis. According to old classifications, there were six prepubertal periodontitis (PPP), 12 localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), 15 post-localized juvenile periodontitis (PLJP), 28 refractory periodontitis (Ref-P), and 54 adult periodontitis (AP) cases. Serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans were determined by an indirect immunofluorescence assay using serotype-specific polyclonal antisera to A. actinomycetemcomitans strains ATCC 29523, ATCC 43728, ATCC 33384, IDH 781 and IDH 1705 (serotype a, b, c, d, and e, respectively). Proportions of serotype b were examined between different diagnostic and age groups with a Z-test for proportions. RESULTS: Most subjects (n = 100, 86.96%) were infected with a single serotype (22 serotype a, 44 serotype b, 30 serotype c, 1 serotype d, and 3 serotype e). There were 11 subjects (9.57%) with two serotypes and two subjects (1.74%) with 3 serotypes. Two individuals had isolates lacking any detectable serotype antigen. Serotype b was the predominant serotype in children under 18 years of age and young adults between 19 to 35 years, although serotype b status was not significantly associated with age. Serotypes d and e were not found in patients under 35 years old. In 62 adult patients, one subject had serotype d and three had serotype e. Serotype b was the most common serotype in aggressive periodontitis (60.61%). The proportion of cases with serotype b was significantly higher in aggressive periodontitis compared to chronic periodontitis (P = 0.031). Other serotypes were not significantly associated with new diagnostic categories. Serotypes d and e were not detected in aggressive periodontitis. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that proportions of serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans are significantly greater in culture-positive patients with aggressive periodontitis than those with chronic periodontitis.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf