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  • 1.
    Brundin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Figdor, David
    Roth, Chrissie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Davies, John K
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Sjögren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Persistence of dead-cell bacterial DNA in ex vivo root canals and influence of nucleases on DNA decay in vitro2010In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, ISSN 1079-2104, E-ISSN 1528-395X, Vol. 110, no 6, p. 789-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amplifiable DNA is preserved after cell death, but the critical determinant is the form of DNA. Free DNA undergoes spontaneous and enzymatic decomposition, whereas cell-bound E. faecalis DNA persists for long periods.

  • 2.
    Brundin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Endodontics.
    Figdor, David
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Sjögren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Endodontics.
    Starvation response and growth in serum of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella intermedia, and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus.2009In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, ISSN 1079-2104, E-ISSN 1528-395X, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 129-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The microbiota inhabiting the untreated root canal differ markedly from those found in post-treatment disease, yet there is limited information on the microbial characteristics distinguishing the different infections. We hypothesized that starvation survival is a key microbial property in species selection. This study analyzed starvation-survival behavior over 60 days of species representative of the untreated root canal infection: Fusobacterium nucleatum, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella intermedia and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus. All species did not survive 1 day in water. In 1% serum, the 4 species could not survive beyond 2-3 weeks. They required a high initial cell density and >or=10% serum to survive the observation period. The results highlight a poor starvation-survival capacity of these 4 species compared with species prevalent in post-treatment infection, which are well equipped to endure starvation and survive in low numbers on minimal serum. These findings point to starvation-survival capacity as a selection factor for microbial participation in post-treatment disease.

  • 3. Flygare, Lennart
    et al.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Kubista, Josef
    Ohlsson, Jan
    Vallö-Christiansen, Jörgen
    Magnusson, Bengt
    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis involving both jaws: report of a case including magnetic resonance correlation1997In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, ISSN 1079-2104, E-ISSN 1528-395X, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 300-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A case of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis in a 14-year-old girl is presented. The disease had an initial aggressive osteolytic appearance involving both the maxilla and the mandible. Conservative treatment with minimal surgical intervention has been successful in this case during a 2-year follow-up period. The value of magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy in this case and the cause of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is discussed.

  • 4.
    Garoff, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Johansson, Elias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Ahlqvist, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Levring Jäghagen, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Arnerlöv, Conny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Wester, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Detection of calcifications in panoramic radiographs in patients with carotid stenoses ≥50%2014In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, ISSN 1079-2104, E-ISSN 1528-395X, Vol. 117, no 3, p. 385-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid stenoses ≥50% are associated with increased risk for stroke that can be reduced by prophylactic carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Calcifications in arteries can be detected in panoramic radiographs (PRs). In a cross-sectional study, we analyzed (1) extirpated plaques for calcification, (2) how often PRs disclosed calcified plaques, (3) how often patients with stenoses ≥50% presented calcifications in PRs, and (4) the additional value of frontal radiographs (FRs).

    STUDY DESIGN: Patients (n = 100) with carotid stenosis ≥50% were examined with PRs and FRs before CEA. Extirpated carotid plaques were radiographically examined (n = 101).

    RESULTS: It was found that 100 of 101 (99%) extirpated plaques were calcified, of which 75 of 100 (75%) were detected in PRs; 84 of 100 (84%) patients presented carotid calcifications in the PRs, in 9.5% contralateral to the stenosis ≥50%.

    CONCLUSIONS: Carotid calcifications are seen in PRs in 84% of patients with carotid stenosis ≥50%, independent of gender. FRs do not contribute significantly to this identification.

  • 5.
    Sahlin-Platt, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wannfors, Karin
    Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Södersjukhuset, Stockholm.
    The effectiveness of compomer as a root-end filling: a clinical investigation2004In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, ISSN 1079-2104, E-ISSN 1528-395X, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 508-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study investigates the treatment outcome of a root-end filling technique that uses a light-cured compomer combined with a light-cured dental adhesive.

    Study design. The study used 34 single-rooted teeth restored with post, core, and crowns. A shallow concave apical preparation was filled with a light-cured compomer with a light-cured dental adhesive. As a control, a chemically cured glass ionomer was used with a conventional root-end preparation. A follow-up clinical and radiographic evaluation of the treatment result was conducted after 1 year.

    Results. A significantly higher success rate (P\.015) was observed in the treatment group that used a compomer (89% complete healing) compared to glass ionomer (44% complete healing).

    Conclusions. When used as a retrograde root filling in a shallow concave preparation, a light-cured compomer and a dental adhesive improves healing regardless of the quality of the remaining root filling.

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