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  • 1. Faraon, Montathar
    et al.
    Ronkko, Kari
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Learning by coding: A sociocultural approach to teaching web development in higher education2019In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As information technology continues to evolve rapidly in society, coding skills become increasingly essential to develop. The purpose of this article is to examine differences between the learner-centered and sociocultural approaches when teaching and learning coding in higher education. A quasi-experiment was applied over six academic semesters evaluating the mentioned approaches in terms of students' explicit attitudes, grades, and course evaluations. The findings indicated that the sociocultural approach may be a viable alternative to the learner-centered approach. More specifically, students indicated a preference for the sociocultural approach over the learner-centered approach, a greater number of students who passed the courses were educated via the sociocultural approach, and overall satisfaction was significantly higher for this approach as well. While the sociocultural approach has demonstrated to be advantageous, its integration in courses must concurrently be carefully balanced against constraints that teachers continuously experience in higher education, such as time and resources, which presents a challenge to the design of courses and to academia at large.

  • 2.
    Fransson, Göran
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Lindberg, Ola J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    From a student perspective, what constitutes a good (or less good) use of ICT in teaching?2018In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 2155-2177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates what upper secondary school students regard as goodor less good teaching using ICT. 367 Swedish upper secondary students in 2 schoolsresponded to a web-based questionnaire. The students were asked to describe one oftheir teachers who used ‘ICT in a way that made them learn very well, and one whoused ICT in a way that made them learn less well’ and to describe what these teachersdid and why their teaching was understood as good or less good. 18 themes wereidentified, of which 17 were combined into eight overall counterpart themes and onenon-counterpart theme. ‘Clarity’ was the most prominent theme, followed by ‘teachers’‘ICT skills’, ‘uses ICT in a good way’, ‘fun factor’, ‘puts information on the LMS’,‘varies the teaching methods’, ‘demonstrates how to use ICT’ and ‘general pedagogicalskills’. The results show that although the specific focus is on students’ views of theirteachers’ use of ICT, general pedagogical skills are a major focus in the themes.Effectiveness is an explicit theme in terms of ICT adding value to teaching andlearning, while ineffectiveness is an implicit underlying dimension in the themesrelating to less good teaching. It is also evident that the students value the sameteacher’s use of ICT in teaching differently.

  • 3.
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Participation and genres of communication in online settings of higher education2008In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 129-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on written utterances in online settings of higher education. It concerns the constitution of the initiation, turn taking and the steering of exchanges of utterances; and it describes these patterns in terms of different genres. The study also concerns participation in higher education and, specifically, participation in educational settings where students and teachers rarely meet face-to-face. Their participation is thus dependant on written utterances in online settings. Overall, this paper discusses constitutive aspects of these written utterances. The educational communication between students and teachers embraced both behaviourist and constructivist genres. The distinction between these two genres relates to the functionality of the utterances, the main metaphor for learning and the responsibilities for the communication taken by students and teachers. The emergence of these genres seems to be affected by interplay between the composition of the study-groups, the structure of the task and other aspects of participation through online settings.

  • 4.
    Jonsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Are online communities for young people an issue for education researchers?: A literature review of Swedish and international studies within the educational field2011In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 55-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Issues concerning children and young people are of interest for the educational field as question about fostering, up-bringing, learning and socialisation are core topics for academic researchers in education. Today many young people in Sweden and around the world spend an increasing amount of their time in online communities or social networking sites. This article aims to investigate whether it also is highlighted by the education researchers. Is it an area to which educational researchers currently contribute? The goal for this article is to present research that is done regarding these issues. My findings show that few academic studies deal with youth and their online environments. Foremost is the research about Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in formal learning situations: in higher education, in schools and classrooms, among professional groups such as teachers and about more general computer use rather than on questions about the fostering or up-bringing of children online. This study implies that online activities for children and young people is a topic currently lying outside the educational research field, resulting in a discussion on why that can be. My work consisted of three parts: a manual search in Swedish research journals at a university library and by searching one Swedish (Libris) and one international (ISI Web of Science) online database. This activity took place in 2009 and covered research conducted between 2003 and 2008. I conclude that this area is one where educational expertise is lacking; hence further research is strongly required.

  • 5.
    Karakoyun, Ferit
    et al.
    Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology, Dicle University, Diyarbakır, Turkey.
    Lindberg, Ola J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Preservice teachers’ views about the twenty-first century skills: A qualitative survey study in Turkey and Sweden2020In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the views of preservice teachers from Turkey and Sweden about twenty-first century skills. The participants of the study were 197 preservice teachers from universities in Turkey and Sweden. In the study, the views of preservice teachers about twenty-first century skills were investigated with an open-ended questionnaire, and the collected qualitative data were analysed using a content analysis method. The findings indicate that within the context of daily life, the preservice teachers from both countries associated twenty-first century skills mostly with technology, digital citizenship, communication, and information literacy. Within the context of education, a great majority of the preservice teachers from Turkey associated twenty-first century skills with information literacy and technology, while those from Sweden associated twenty-first century skills mostly with technology, distance learning and communication. In addition, it was seen that among the skills considered by the preservice teachers from both countries to be necessary for their careers and for their future students, they all put most emphasis on digital literacy. However, as the second most frequent skills, the preservice teachers from Turkey emphasized critical thinking and problem solving skills, while the preservice teachers from Sweden mentioned communication skills and information literacy.

  • 6.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindberg, J. Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Fransson, Göran
    Faculty of Education and Business Studies University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    What do upper secondary school teachers want to know from research on the use of ICT and how does this inform a research design?2017In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 2897-2914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates what teachers taking part in a longitudinal research project on the use of ICT for teaching and learning in three upper secondary schools in Sweden want to learn more about. At the beginning of the project eighty-four teachers were invited to respond to a questionnaire relating to what teachers wanted to learn more about during their participation in a research project, both for themselves, their colleagues and their students. The questionnaire consisted of Likert-scale and open-ended questions. Sixty teachers responded, thereby yielding a response rate of 71%. In focus in this paper is a qualitative content analysis of the open-ended questions. The analysis revealed six desired areas of learning: (a) technological aspects, (b) how to use ICT for teaching and learning, (c) the Learning Management System (LMS), (d) safety and plagiarism, (e) best practice and (f) collaboration and professional development. The aspects of knowledge addressed in these themes were analysed and discussed in relation to the TPACK model. A conclusion that can be drawn from the analysis is that the teachers inquired different forms of knowledge and that interpretation of ‘technological pedagogical content knowledge’ only emerged in one of the themes. This study then informed the research design in multiple ways, the two most apparent being a survey of students acknowledging teachers’ expressed research interests and the design and implementation of a formative intervention group interview.

  • 7.
    Pettersson, Fanny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    On the issues of digital competence in educational contexts: a review of literature2018In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 1005-1021Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review focus is on how digital competence in educational contexts has been addressed in international research over the last 10 years in terms of policy, organizational infrastructures, strategic leadership as well as teachers and their teaching practices. The analysis shows that although research on digital competence in educational contexts has increased, knowledge on digital competence related to organizational infrastructures and strategic leadership are sparse. The analysis indicated that most research focuses on the specific competence needed by teachers and therefore tends to neglect the influence of broader contextual conditions in the wider school setting. Based on the review, three suggestions for further research can be provided. Firstly, to address research on organizational infrastructures and digital competent leadership. Secondly, to elaborate on theoretical frameworks that can close the gap between research on policy, organizational infrastructures, strategic leadership as well as teachers and their teaching practices. A third suggestion is for researchers to become involved in the development of new approaches that can enhance digital competence in educational contexts. It can be concluded that digital competence might not benefit from being regarded as an isolated phenomena on the level of single actors. Rather, it can be regarded as an organizational task, influenced and driven by several contextual factors embedded within and across a wider school organization.

  • 8.
    Pettersson, Fanny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Implementing distance teaching at a large scale in medical education: a struggle between dominant and non-dominant teaching activities2015In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 359-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines possibilities and challenges when implementing distance teaching of theoretical content in a regionalized medical program (RMP). It will be argued that Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) and the concepts of dominant and non-dominant activities, including conflicts and transitional actions, can lead to an understanding of the distance teaching implementation process. The concepts further provide a theoretical lens through which one can understand the complex relationship between the established and historically rooted, face-to-face teaching activity and the new non-dominant distance teaching activity introduced in the educational setting. Data in the study was collected through an online survey, log data, observations, and in-depth interviews. During the analysis, conflicts between the dominant face-to-face teaching and non-dominant distance teaching activity were identified, and they partly inhibited medical teachers at the program from adopting and developing distance teaching. By illustrating transitional actions as small, innovative bottom-up solutions, further analysis revealed how medical teachers tried to overcome those conflicts to facilitate the adoption and development of distance teaching. The non-dominant distance teaching activity, even if not fully adopted, actually influenced and facilitated change in educational practice. The discussion argues that understanding the implementation of a non-dominant teaching activity in medical education in terms of mere success or failure is not fruitful. Instead, we should strive for sensitivity by closely analyzing the implementation process as interplay between dominant and non-dominant teaching activities. Such sensitivity will make it possible to cultivate future educational development and change.

1 - 8 of 8
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