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  • 1. Brandella, Gerd
    et al.
    Staberg, Else-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Mathematics: a female, male or gender-neutral domain? A study of attitudes among students at secondary level.2008In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 495-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current study is to investigate whether Swedish secondary school students perceive mathematics as a female, male or gender-neutral domain. A sample of 1300 students in two age groups, 15- and 17-years, answered a questionnaire and about 50 students participated in interviews. The main part of the inquiry form consists of Who and mathematics, an attitude scale recently developed by other researchers. The results are analysed with respect to gender, school year and study programme. Gendered attitudes were found among considerable minorities. There is a marked tendency to view mathematics as a symbolically male domain: positive aspects are associated with boys and negative aspects perceived as more female. Older students hold more strongly gendered views than younger. Boys in the science programme have the strongest beliefs of mathematics as a male domain.

  • 2.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Weiner, Gaby
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Gender, research and change in teacher education: a Swedish dimension2007In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 317-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the factors that are at present reconstructing teacher education in Sweden and in other European countries, including professionalization, inherited traditions, feminization and globalization. The authors use as a basis for the paper: documentary analysis and nearly 60 qualitative semi-structured interviews with management and teaching staff from teacher education at one Swedish higher education institution, Umeå University. Five overall themes emerged from the study: gender; teacher education cultures; organizational changes; collaboration; and research. It is argued that women and men in teacher education are positioned differently with regard to change. Women teacher educators identify more with research and accountability imperatives while their male colleagues tend to focus more on classroom knowledge and skills. The paper considers possible explanations and makes tentative extrapolations to other European sites in varying political contexts.

  • 3. Forbes, Joan
    et al.
    Ohrn, Elisabet
    Weiner, Gaby
    Umeå University, Umeå School of Education (USE).
    Slippage and/or symbolism: gender, policy and educational governance in Scotland and Sweden2011In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 761-776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an overview and analysis of the relationship between gender, educational policy, and governance in Scotland and Sweden and the two countries' response to European Union and global legislative and policy change. In Scotland, gender is mainly invisible in recent policies on inclusion, achievement beyond academic attainment, and the idealisation of the child. Gender is thus marginalised within a range of factors contributing to social in/equality. In Sweden, in contrast, gender has higher visibility in policy and governance as both an indicator of democracy and a means of preserving social democratic consensus and prosperity. However, recently its privileged position has come under attack. We draw on social capital, gender, and policy theory to analyse the range of influences on gender and educational governance in the two countries including that of the social capital of organised feminism.

  • 4.
    Nyström, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Teacher talk: producing, resisting and challenging discourses about the science classroom2009In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 735-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the project which forms the basis of this article was to make the science classroom more inclusive by challenging discriminatory practices. Science teachers from two secondary schools in Sweden agreed to be involved in an action research project over one year. Each teacher was to carry out a study concerning their own teaching and regular meetings were held for planning, evaluation and discussion. These meetings were analysed and suggest that science subjects are gendered and female science teachers face more resistance than their male peers, sometimes even being positioned as unprofessional. However, the science discourse is continually negotiable with the analysis showing challenge both to science as a male field and to the content that makes up science. Power relations other than gender are also visible and make patterns more complex. The analysis will offer a conceptual framework for understanding how gender in education is produced and reproduced in practice.

     

     

    The aim of the project which forms the basis of this article was to make the science classroom more inclusive by challenging discriminatory practices. Science teachers from two secondary schools in Sweden agreed to be involved in an action research project over one year. Each teacher was to carry out a study concerning their own teaching and regular meetings were held for planning, evaluation and discussion. These meetings were analysed and suggest that science subjects are gendered and female science teachers face more resistance than their male peers, sometimes even being positioned as unprofessional. However, the science discourse is continually negotiable with the analysis showing challenge both to science as a male field and to the content that makes up science. Power relations other than gender are also visible and make patterns more complex. The analysis will offer a conceptual framework for understanding how gender in education is produced and reproduced in practice.

  • 5.
    Silfver, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Maritha, Jacobsson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Arnell, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Härgestam, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Widding, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Classroom bodies: affect, body language, and discourse when schoolchildren encounter national tests in mathematics2018In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to analyse how Swedish grade three children are discursively positioned as pupils when they are taking national tests in mathematics and when they reflect on the testing situation afterwards. With support from theories about affective-discursive assemblages, we explore children's body language, emotions, and talk in light of the two overarching discourses that we believe frame the classroom: the 'testing discourse' and the 'development discourse'. Through the disciplinary power of these main discourses children struggle to conduct themselves in order to become recognized as intelligible subjects and 'ideal pupils'. The analysis, when taking into account how affects and discourses intertwine, shows that children can be in 'untroubled', 'troubled', or ambivalent subject positions.

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