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  • 1. Ciereszko, I
    et al.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Glucose and mannose regulate the expression of a major sucrose synthase gene in Arabidopsis via hexokinase-dependent mechanisms2002In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 40, no 11, p. 907-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is an important enzyme involved in sucrose synthesis/breakdown in all plants. Sus1, a major SuSy gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, was upregulated by sucrose, glucose and D-mannose, but not 3-O-methylglucose, when those compounds were fed to excised leaves. Mannos, was more effective than glucose or sucrose in the induction of Sus1, with strong effects observed at a concentration as low as 20, mM. When fed to the excised leaves, N-acetyl-glucosamine, an inhibitor of hexokinase (HXK) enzymatic activity, decreased sucrose- and glucose-dependent, but not mannose-dependent, upregulation of Sus1. The sucrose/glucose-dependent Sus1 expression was strongly induced in transgenic Arabidopsis HXK-overexpressing (OE) plants, whereas mannose-dependent Sus1 expression markedly decreased in OE, but not in HXK-"antisense", Arabidopsis plants. Feeding with sucrose resulted in a marked increase of glucose content in leaves, suggesting that it is glucose rather than sucrose that serves as a signal in upregulating Sus1 expression in sucrose-fed plants. The data suggest that Sus1 is regulated by a HXK-dependent pathway, with glucose and mannose effects differentially sensed/transmitted via the HXK step. (C) 2002 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  • 2. Faivre-Rampant, O.
    et al.
    Kevers, C.
    Bellini, C.
    Gaspar, T.
    Peroxidase activity, ethylene production, lignification and growth limitation in shoots of a nonrooting mutant of tobacco1998In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 873-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rooting recalcitrant rac Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi mutant has been multiplied in vitro under the form of shoots in parallel to wild-type. rac Shoots grew at a lower rate and did not root whatever the treatments when compared to those of wild-type shoots. They were characterized by a higher lignin level, a higher total specific peroxidase activity with higher activity of both acidic and basic isoperoxidases (although missing and supernumerary isoenzymes were observed), and higher ethylene production. These observations might be causally related to growth inhibitions as similar incidences have been noted in different stress-induced growth limitation, through cell wall rigidification and auxin catabolism. The relationship between these aspects and rooting recalcitrance remains to be explored. (C) Elsevier, Paris.

  • 3. Igamberdiev, A U
    et al.
    Bykova, N V
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Origins and metabolism of formate in higher plants1999In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 37, no 7-8, p. 503-513Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Formate, a simple one-carbon compound, is readily metabolized in plant tissues. In greening potato tubers, similar to some procaryotes, formate is directly synthesized via a ferredoxin-dependent fixation of CO2, serving as the main precursor for carbon skeletons in biosynthetic pathways. In other plant species and tissues, formate appears as a side-product of photorespiration and of fermentation pathways, but possibly also as a product of direct CO2 reduction in chloroplasts. Formate metabolism is closely related to serine synthesis and to all subsequent reactions originating from serine. Formate may have a role in biosynthesis of numerous compounds, in energetic metabolism and in si,signal transduction pathways related to stress response. This review summarizes the current state of formate research, physiological/biochemical and molecular aspects. (C) Elsevier, Paris.

  • 4. Igamberdiev, A U
    et al.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Capacity for NADPH/NADP turnover in the cytosol of barley seed endosperm: The role of NADPH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase2000In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 747-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) endosperm from developing seeds was found to contain relatively high activities of cytosolic NAD(P)II-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR-2) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH). In contrast, activities of peroxisomal NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR-1) and glycolate oxidase as well as cytosolic NAD(P)H-dependent glyoxylate reductase were very low or absent in the endosperm both during maturation and seed germination, indicating the lack of a complete glycolate cycle in this tissue. In addition, activities of cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were low or absent in the endosperm. The endosperm HPR-2 exhibited similar properties to those of an earlier described HPR-2 from green leaves, e.g. activities with both hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate, utilization of both NADPH and NADH as cofactors, and a strong uncompetitive inhibition by oxalate (K-i in the order of micromolar). In etiolated leaves, both HPR-1 and HPR-2 were present with the same activity as in green leaves, indicating that the lack of HPR-I in the endosperm is not a general feature of non-photosynthetic tissues. We conclude that the endosperm has considerable capacity for cytosolic NADP/NADPH cycling via HPR-2 and ICDH, the former being possibly involved in the utilization of a serine-derived carbon. (C) 2000 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.

  • 5.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    A new player in the starch field2001In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 759-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A possible role of a newly discovered ADP-glucose pyrophosphatase (AGPPase) is discussed in the context of starch synthesis. The enzyme hydrolyses ADP-glucose (starch precursor) and may potentially divert the flow of carbon from starch synthase, resulting in a 'futile cycle' when 'coupled' with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. The activity of AGPPase is inversely related to starch yield in sink tissues, and may be prone to inhibition by Pi and certain other products of the starch pathway. The AGPPase likely belongs to a `nudix' family of enzymes that in animal tissues and yeast are known to regulate levels of activated sugars. Some strategies for future research are underlined. (C) 2001 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.

  • 6.
    Oquist, Gunnar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    HURRY, VM
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    HUNER, NPA
    THE TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENCE OF THE REDOX STATE OF Q(A) AND SUSCEPTIBILITY OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS TO PHOTOINHIBITION1993In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 683-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between the redox state of primary, stable quinone acceptor of photosystem II (Q(A)) and the susceptibility of photosynthesis to photoinhibition at different temperatures was investigated. Non-hardened and cold-hardened seedlings of winter rye, and of winter and spring cultivars of wheat, were obtained by growth at either 20/16-degrees-C (day/night) or 5/5-degrees-C (day/night), respectively. A single, curvi-linear relationship was established between the steady-state redox level Of Q(A) and the susceptibility of photosynthesis to short-term (8 h) photoinhibition at 5 or 25-degrees-C when spring and winter cultivars of rye and wheat, in non-hardened or cold-hardened states, were plotted together. Furthermore, irrespective of temperature (0 to 25-degrees-C) or state of cold-hardiness, the susceptibility of photosynthesis to photoinhibition was controlled fully in winter rye by the redox state Of Q(A); e.g. similar susceptibilities to photoinhibition were obtained at 0, 5 and 25-degrees-C provided that the photon fluence rate at the different temperatures was adjusted to keep 50% of the photosystem II reaction centres in a closed state under steady-state illumination. Our results suggest that the primary reason plants become prone to photoinhibition at low temperatures is that the proportion of closed reaction centres increases due to the low temperature imposed constraints on photosynthesis. Thus, we propose that low temperature sensitized photoinhibition results from low temperature inhibition of photosynthesis rather than from low temperature inhibition of the photosystem II repair cycle.

  • 7.
    Selstam, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    GALACTOLIPID BIOSYNTHESIS IN CHLOROPLASTS OF NONHARDENED AND FROST-HARDENED SEEDLINGS OF SCOTS PINE1990In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 477-483Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Siedlecka, A
    et al.
    Krupa, Z
    Samuelsson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Primary carbon metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris plants under Cd/Fe interaction1997In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 951-957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of the Cd/Fe interaction on primary carbon metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Slowianka plants was investigated. It was documented earlier that Cd induced a decrease in the leaf Fe content, and increased levels of Fe may reduce Cd toxicity. The aim of the present study was to check whether Cd is toxic to Calvin cycle enzymes and especially if different Fe levels can modify the Cd effect. Bush-bean seedlings were cultivated in the presence of different Cd concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50 mu M) and at different Fe doses (deficient: 0 mmol, normal: 0.25 mmol, excessive: 0.5 mmol). Leaf content of ATP, ADP, Calvin cycle metabolites, activity of RUBISCO and carbonic anhydrase were measured. The influence of Cd/Fe interaction on the content of Calvin cycle metabolites seemed to be of both direct and indirect nature. The Cd-induced increase in ATP content, and in the ATP/ADP ratio, resulted from a decreased ATP consumption. At a higher Fe dose, the Cd/Fe interaction resulted in a revitalisation of the adenylate pool and Calvin cycle metabolites. The inhibition of RUBISCO carboxylase activity may be considered as the primary plant response to Cd-stress. The mechanisms of RUBISCO activation operate to overcome this limitation, although their efficiency was decreased by high Cd concentrations, resulting in decreased RUBISCO activity. At a low Cd concentration, the increase in RUBISCO activity was correlated with increased carbonic anhydrase activity.

  • 9. Vera-Sirera, Francisco
    et al.
    Minguet, Eugenio G.
    Singh, Sunil Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ljung, Karin
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Blazquez, Miguel A.
    Carbonell, Juan
    Role of polyamines in plant vascular development2010In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 534-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several pieces of evidence suggest a role for polyamines in the regulation of plant vascular development. For instance, polyamine oxidase gene expression has been shown to be associated with lignification, and downregulation of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase causes dwarfism and enlargement of the vasculature. Recent evidence from Arabidopsis thaliana also suggests that the active polyamine in the regulation of vascular development is the tetraamine thermospermine. Thermospermine biosynthesis is catalyzed by the aminopropyl transferase encoded by ACAULIS5, which is specifically expressed in xylem vessel elements. Both genetic and molecular evidence support a fundamental role for thermospermine in preventing premature maturation and death of the xylem vessel elements. This safeguard action of thermospermine has significant impact on xylem cell morphology, cell wall patterning and cell death as well as on plant growth in general. This manuscript reviews recent reports on polyamine function and places polyamines in the context of the known regulatory mechanisms that govern vascular development. (C) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

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