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  • 1.
    Bergström, Peter
    Umeå University.
    Process-based assessment for professional learning in higher education: perspectives on the student-teacher relationship2010In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 33-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a study that was carried out in autumn 2007 with students in a professional nurse education distance course at a Swedish university. The study aimed to develop a greater understanding of the student-teacher relationship based on research questions addressing the teachers’ role, the learning process, and the assessment process in traditional approaches to teaching and learning. A didactical design was adopted, focusing on three learning outcomes in three phases. In each of the three phases, these learning outcomes were assessed by each student documenting his/her knowledge at the beginning, middle, and end of the course. Data was collected via in-depth interviews with students (n = 14) and through a questionnaire (n = 40) and was analysed using an inductive thematic analysis of the material. The results indicate a student-teacher relationship involving ambiguity and complexity in relation to the degree of teacher direction as being teacher-centred or learner-centred and also in relation to the learning process as being reproductive or productive. The interpretation of the results shows diverse aspects of the student-teacher relationship arising from students’ beliefs about teaching, learning, and assessment and, in particular, process-based assessment. The locus of control involves the teachers’ role, the learning process, and the assessment process, which illuminates different perspectives of power relations in the student-teacher relationship.

  • 2.
    Bergström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Shifting the emphasis from teaching to learning: process-based assessment in nurse education2011In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 108-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shifting from an emphasis on teaching to learning is a complex task for both teachers andstudents. This paper reports on a qualitative study of teachers in a nurse specialist educationprogramme meeting this shift in a distance education course. The study aimed togain a better understanding of the teacher-student relationship by addressing researchquestions in relation to the students’ role, the learning process, and the assessment process.A didactical design comprising three phases focusing on distinct learning outcomesfor the course was adopted. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with teachersand were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The results indicate a shift towardsa problematising and holistic approach to teaching, learning, and assessment. This shifthighlighted a teacher-student relationship with a shared responsibility in the orchestrationof the learning experience. The overall picture outlines a distance education experience ofprocess-based assessment characterised by the imposition of teachers’ rules and a lack ofcreativity due to the limited role of ICT merely as a container of content.

  • 3.
    Hult, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Dahlgren, Ethel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hamilton, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Söderström, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers' invisible presence in net-based distance education2005In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 6, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conferencing – or dialogue – has always been a core activity in liberal adult education. More recently, attempts have been made to transfer such conversations online in the form of computer-mediated conferencing. This transfer has raised a range of pedagogical questions, most notably “Can established practices be continued? Or must new forms of participation and group management be established? This paper addresses these questions. It is based on two sources: (1) 3,700 online postings from a variety of Net-based adult education courses in Sweden; and (2) interviews with participants and course-leaders. It comprises a discussion of online conversational activity and, in particular, the absent presence and pedagogic orientation of teachers who steer learners towards explicit and implicit course goals. In other words, it is a reminder that adult education is not a free-floating form of self instruction but, rather, operates within boundaries created and managed by other human beings.

  • 4.
    Norberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Händel, Åsa
    Arvidsjaur kommun, Lärcentrum.
    Ödling, Per
    Inst för Elektro- och informationsteknik, Lunds universitet.
    Using MOOCs at Learning Centers in Northern Sweden2015In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 137-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the use of globally accessible Massive Open Online Courses, MOOCs, for addressing the needs of lifelong learners at community learning centers in Northern Sweden, by the forming "glonacal" or "blended" MOOCs. The Scandinavian "study circle" concept is used to facilitate the studying of MOOCs. Although the technical possibilities for Swedish universities to offer accessible education are constantly increasing, most Swedish universities do not, at present, prioritize courses for off-campus students. The available web courses in asynchronous formats are difficult to master for untraditional learners and leaves the learning centers with limited possibilities. Therefore, a Nordplus Horizontal project 2014-2016 with partners in three Nordic countries is developing models for the use of MOOCs in learning centers and organisations. A small pilot course case at the learning centre in Arvidsjaur and its outcomes is presented, including the interactions with Lund University which has an ongoing piloting project on use and examination of MOOCs. This concept development is discussed as a blended learning design and as a "glonacal" phenomenon with Marginson and Rhoades' "glonacal agency heuristics" (2002) forming a background for an actor analysis. Future scenarios are outlined. 

  • 5.
    Norberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Stöckel, Birgit
    Antti, Marta-Lena
    Time Shifting and Agile Time Boxes in Course Design2017In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 88-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) into higher education courses is often called blended learning although it often relates to course design. It is usually understood in place categories, as a combination of traditional classroom-based sessions and Internet-enabled distance or online learning practices. One alternative understanding of ICT integration can be constructed of time categories, with an understanding of ICTs more as process- and project-related. Two such design frameworks are conceptually presented and then used together in a small case study in a pilot experiment in physics at the preparatory level for entering engineering programs at a university in Northern Sweden. These are a) time shift mechanisms between synchronous and asynchronous learning modes in the course process and b) agile frameworks mechanisms adapted from work process developments in the software industry. Both are here used to address common procrastination problems in flexible education. Data were collected in student interviews and analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results show student satisfaction with the work rhythm and that a feeling of presence, which enables easy interaction, can be facilitated by synchronicity.

  • 6.
    Popov, Oleg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Teachers' and students' experiences of simultaneous teaching in an international distance and on-campus master's programme in engineering2009In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish universities frequently offer campus-based education as well as online courses, a system commonly referred to as dual mode. This paper analyses some challenging pedagogical aspects of a master's programme in engineering developed and delivered simultaneously online and on campus. Course evaluations, questionnaires, and interviews with the programme teachers were the main instruments used in this study. Activity theory was used as a theoretical framework for data collection and analysis. The study evidences the nature of problems experienced by on-campus and distance students as well as conflicts of interest and expectations existing between these two student groups. Teaching simultaneously in two modes demands extra effort from the course teachers, who are aware of the problems related to pedagogical communication needed by both groups. Though teaching in the dual mode offers economic benefits for the department, the simultaneous mode of teaching is experienced as problematical by both groups of students, with distance students appearing to be more disadvantaged in the programme.

1 - 6 of 6
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