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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Benckert, Sylvia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wiberg, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Gapet har minskat: skillnader mellan hög- och lågpresterande flickors och pojkars attityder till biologi, fysik och kemi 1995 och 20072011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the change over time of boys’ and girls’ attitudes towards biology, physics and chemistry. We use data from the TIMSS studies for grade 8 in Sweden to investigate how the attitudes for high- and low performing pupils have changed between 1995 and 2007. The attitude is measured by four questions from the student questionnaire in the TIMSS study. The results indicate that there have been some changes in attitudes between 1995 and 2007. High-achieving pupils and especially boys have a more negative attitude towards all three subjects, biology, physics and chemistry, in 2007 compared to 1995. The low-achieving students think that they are performing better in all three subjects 2007 compared to 1995. The difference between the group that are most positive to physics and chemistry and the least positive group has diminished between the two years. The results are discussed in relation to the changes in Swedish schools during the period.

  • 2.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Science verbs as a tool for investigating scientific phenomena: a pedagogical idea emerging from practitioner-researcher collaboration2016In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 235-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper communicates the pedagogical idea of approaching scientific phenomena through verbs. The idea has sprung from a collaboration between preschool practitioners and a researcher, addressing science education in preschool (children aged 1-5 years). Drawing on a joint problem inventory, the project group aimed to create a teaching model that supports inquiry-oriented approaches to science, and teachers’ ability of distinguishing chemical processes and physics phenomena in everyday practice. The core idea of the teaching model turned out to be a list of everyday verbs, connected to scientific phenomena. Starting from verbs appear to help teachers to recognise the scientific phenomena in everyday practice. Further, the verbs guide the formulating of questions that can be answered by scientific inquiry, such as: ''what matters to how something melts/rolls/mixes?''.

  • 3.
    Berge, Maria
    et al.
    Chalmers, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Anna T, Danielsson
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Ingerman, Åke
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Different stories of group work: exploring problem solving in engineering education2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to further the understanding of group work in higher education, primarily in science. This is done through an empirical investigation of problem solving in small groups. Position theory isused as an analytic tool for describing the complex and dynamic processes of group work, focusing simultaneously on the physics content and the student community and how they constitute each other. We analysed four video-recorded sessions with students from two Master’s programs, Engineering Physics and Bioengineering, respectively. The students addressed two introductory mechanics problems. The analysis resulted in a characterisation in terms of seven ‘storylines’ of two different kinds. These are argued to reflect different aspects of engineering student communities, where one kind of storylines captures ways of approaching the problems and the other kind exemplifies boundary work involved in the constitution of communities.

  • 4.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    School of Education, Malmö university.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Chemistry in crisis?: Perspectives on teaching and learning chemistry in Swedish upper secondary schools2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explanations for a decline in the number of students studying chemistry at advanced level all over the world have been sought for quite some time. Many students do not find chemistry relevant and meaningful and there have been difficulties in developing school chemistry courses that engage students sufficiently and tempt them to further studies in the field. In this study, Swedish upper secondary school students (Ns=372) and their teachers (Nt=18) answered a questionnaire on their experiences of the content and the working methods of their chemistry course. They were also given the opportunity to express ideas on how to make chemistry courses more interesting and meaningful. The results point out some subject areas as both easy and interesting, e.g. atomic structure; while other areas are hard to understand but still interesting, e.g. biochemistry. The students find chemistry lessons teacher-centred, something they appreciate. When teachers and students gave suggestions on how to improve the relevance of chemistry education at upper secondary level, more laboratory work and connections to everyday life were the most common proposals. But on the whole, these students seem quite satisfied with their chemistry courses.

  • 5.
    Due, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Tellgren, Britt
    örebro universitet.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Sundberg, Bodil
    Örebro univ, NT-akademin.
    Inte som i skolan - pedagoger positionerar naturvetenskap i förskolan: Preschool teachers talk about science – Positioning themselves and positioning science2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 411-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses how preschool teachers, who include a scientific content in their practice, describe their practice and their view of science in preschool. The study is based on 20 interviews in 9 Swedish preschools. The theoretical and analytical framework combine "communities of practice"(Lave & Wenger) and "positioning theory" (Harré & Langehove). The stories reveal a strong position for the pre-school curriculum and traditions. A prominent storyline is that Science in preschool is something different from science in school. This includes an anti-authoritarian view with a focus on "the competent child". The preschool teachers affirm fantasy, creativity and intuition as a part of science and they position science as easy to access. They also position themselves as pedagogues competent to manage science in preschool. One of the dilemmas is about letting children’s interests and initiatives drive the activities while educators curriculum- based goals have certain intentions to fulfill.

  • 6.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmberg, Claes
    Science for life: a conceptual framework for constru´ction and analysis of socio-scientific issues2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework to be used as a tool for analyzing work with socio-scientific issues (SSI) and for constructing SSI cases in secondary school. The framework consists of six components describing the more detailed characteristics of SSI. The components were chosen to reflect what we know from research about what might have an impact on students’ learning and interest in science. Six socio-scientific cases were then constructed and these are discussed in the article. The cases are relevant in that they both display the characteristics of SSI and meet the requirements of the Swedish national curriculum. The components and the cases are described in a table. This work is the first step in an evidence-based research project aiming at investigating if, how and why students and teachers in secondary school develop knowledge and interests when working with SSI.

  • 7.
    Högström, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Benckert, Sylvia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Laborativt arbete i grundskolans senare år: Lärares perspektiv2010In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 80-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe the results from interviews withscience teachers in lower secondary school. The teachers were asked whatthey wanted to achieve with laboratory work, what difficulties theyexperienced and if there were any differences between lab work in biology,chemistry and physics. The results show that the teachers wanted lab workto help the students develop their understanding, to make them interestedand to develop their laboratory skills. Some of the teachers described labwork that included scientific inquiry but not, specifically, knowledge abouthow to systematically investigate phenomena in nature. Aspects of natureof science were rare. Lack of time to discuss with the students during labwork was seen as one difficulty. Laboratory exercises in chemistry wereoften regarded too abstract while lab work in physics and biology weremuch easier to link to everyday life.

  • 8.
    Manni, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Sporre, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    University of Kiel.
    Perceived learning experiences regarding Education for sustainable development: within Swedish outdoor education traditions2013In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 187-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents results from a Swedish exploratory study investigating perceptions of the learning experiences related to education for sustainable development (ESD) by students 10-12 years old. A comprehensive questionnaire with both open and closed questions asking for the students’ cognitive, emotional, practical, social, and situated learning experiences was developed. The empirical material consists of the responses from 209 students from six schools. The schools were selected to get a variety of both school programs regarding ESD and outdoor education activities. The results reported here reveal relationships between areas of students’ learning experiences, mainly between the cognitive, emotional, and social areas. Comparisons between the schools illustrate different approaches to teaching as well as the students’ diverse perceptions of these practices. The questionnaire developed for the project proved to be a valid instrument for researching the relationships and complexities in ESD learning, thus demonstrating its potential for use in future studies.

  • 9.
    Näs, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Student reasoning while investigating plant material2008In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 177-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this project, 10-12 year old students investigated plant material to learn more about plants and photosynthesis. The research study was conducted to reveal the students’ scientific reasoning during their investigation and also to establish what they already knew, what they wanted to know, and what they actually learned about plants and photosynthesis. The eleven different tasks helped students investigate plant anatomy, plant physiology, and the gases involved in photosynthesis and respiration. The study was carried out in the ordinary classrooms. The collected data consisted of audio-taped discussions, students’ notebooks, and field notes. Students’ discussions and written work, during the different plant tasks, were analysed to see how the students’ learning and understanding processes developed. The analysis is descriptive and categorised from a modified general typology of student’s epistemological reasoning. The study shows students’ level of interest in doing the tasks, their struggle with new words and concepts, and how they develop their knowledge about plant physiology. The study confirms that students, in this age group, develop understanding and show an interest in complicated processes in natural science, e.g. photosynthesis.

  • 10.
    Persson, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics Technology and Science Education.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Garpelin, Anders
    Mälardalens högskola, Sverige.
    Ämnesintegerrad undevisning i naturvetenskap - Vad är det?2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 47-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biology, chemistry and physics might be taught as separate subjects, but sometimes they are taught as combined with one another or with other subjects.  Nationally and internationally the concept integrated science teaching lacks a uniform definition. To find out more about how practicing teachers define and perform integrated teaching, interviews were undertaken with five teachers, teaching science in school year 7 to 9 (age 13-16) in the Swedish compulsory school. Two ways of integrating science teaching were found; one combining the science subjects and one combining the science subjects with other school subjects. Results showed differences in the ways of teaching integrated science, in the interpretation of what the teachers meant by science integrating teaching and which obstacles and possibilities they saw. Visions about working with integrated science in the future and how these visions correspond to teacher’s reality is also discussed.

  • 11.
    Persson, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Malmö högskola.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    En fallstudie av lärares intentioner med och utfallet av ämnesintegrerad naturvetenskaplig undervisning i skolår 92012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 73-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we report a study about two teachers’ intentions with integrated science in lower secondaryschool and how these intentions turn out in their classrooms. The study is based on intentionalanalysis of interviews and classrooms observations. The teachers’ intentions are a result of internaland external factors. Internal factors for organizing teaching as integrated science were to let thestudents get a holistic understanding of the science content, to be able to apply knowledge and to seethe relevance in their daily lives. External factors were school organization and syllabuses. In practicethe teachers clearly connected to the students’ daily life while the holistic approach did not seem tobe as important. In classroom reality the external factors became important and made the teacherschange their actions.

  • 12.
    Westman, Anna-Karin
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Applied Science and Design.
    Investigation of Peer Discussions on Genetic Concepts2013In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is an investigation on how students express their understanding of genetic concepts and their relations during peer discussions. Participants in this study were non-major students from a Swedish upper secondary school. Special attention was paid to how the groups treated the domain- specific vocabulary, how they expressed their understanding of reduction division and how they connected concepts from different biological organization levels. These subject areas have been reported as difficult for students in earlier studies. The results show discussions concerning the three subject areas and in the discussions the students help each other to make the meaning of the genetic concepts clear. The analysis is based on socio-cultural perspectives with focus on how the participants treated the genetic content from the previously presented subject areas in their discussions.

  • 13.
    Wilhelmsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lidestav, Gun
    Institutionen för skoglig resurshushållning och geomatik.
    Teachers' intentions with outdoor teaching in school forests: Skills and knowledge teachers want students to develop2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, no 1/12, p. 26-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an interest among Swedish teachers to locate teaching outdoors. This study focuses on four teachers in grades 4-6, to explore their intentions and objectives with regular teaching outdoors. Data sources consist of semi-structured interviews, descriptions on successful activities, and reflections on metaphors.   The use of intentional analysis and Bloom’s revised taxonomy on teachers’ objectives show that the teachers stress the out-of-school learning that draws on the actual world and concrete material. Yet their objectives with these authentic experiences are diverse.  Two teachers have mainly cognitive objectives with a holistic view of knowledge where outdoor and indoor interact. To become knowledgeable, each individual student needs teaching in this proper context. The other two teachers primarily have affective objectives, in a dichotomy between learning theoretical knowledge indoors, and learning practical, concrete knowledge outdoors. They consider the outdoor arena as crucial for students with learning difficulties.

  • 14.
    Åström, Maria
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Institutionen för teknik, fysik och matematik, Härnösand.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Institutionen för teknik, fysik och matematik, Härnösand.
    Using hierarchical linear models to test differences in Swedish results from OECD's PISA 2003: integrated and subject-specific science education2007In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, no 2, p. 121-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possible effects of different organisations of the science curriculum in schools participating in PISA 2003 are tested with a hierarchical linear model (HLM) of two levels. The analysis is based on science results. Swedish schools are free to choose how they organise the science curriculum. They may choose to work subject-specifically (with Biology, Chemistry and Physics), integrated (with Science) or to mix these two. In this study, all three ways of organising science classes in compulsory school are present to some degree. None of the different ways of organising science education displayed statistically significant better student results in scientific literacy as measured in PISA 2003. The HLM model used variables of gender, country of birth, home language, preschool attendance, an economic, social and cultural index as well as the teaching organisation.

  • 15.
    Österlund, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics Technology and Science Education.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics Technology and Science Education.
    Students’ understanding of redox reactions in three situations2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Redox models that explain electrochemical issues have been found to be difficult to teach and to learn. The aim of this study was to investigate students’ reasoning about redox reactions in three situations, how they used the activity series of metals and if they transferred knowledge between domains. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with ten students on two different occasions and dealt with three situations 1) a laboratory practical on corrosion; 2) a demonstration of zinc and copper sulphate solution; and 3) a corroded sculpture. The results indicated that the electron model was fundamental and reinforced. The identification of the reducing agent in the situations was unproblematic. The students’ conceptions regarding the oxidizing agent varied and diverged from the scientific model in some situations. Depending on the situation, the activity series of metal became a tool as well as an obstacle. Some transfer of knowledge between the classroom and the outdoor situation was indicated.

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