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  • 1.
    Burke, Catherine
    University of Cambridge.
    The decorated school: Cross-disciplinary research in the history of art as integral to the design of educational environments2013In: Paedagogica historica, ISSN 0030-9230, E-ISSN 1477-674X, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 813-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the opening up of a new, rich seam of interdisciplinaryresearch that brings together historians of education with historians of art andarchitecture to examine the meaning and incidence of“The Decorated School”.It examines the origins of the idea of art as educator in the nineteenth centuryand discusses how ideas about the education of taste accompanied theestablishment of mass education in industrialised nations during the early part ofthe twentieth century. Some examples of Decorated Schools in Britain andEurope are discussed with reference to the nature of the international andinterdisciplinary interpretation made possible by the research network. Finally,some of the challenges of interdisciplinary research in this area are presented, aswell as rich opportunities for further exploration. The article concludes that inorder to come closer to a realisation of how pupils might have experienced TheDecorated School in the past, we need to incorporate histories of children’splay-worlds in our project.

  • 2.
    Evertsson, Jakob
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Classroom wall charts and Biblical history: a study of educational technology in elementary schools in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Sweden2014In: Paedagogica historica, ISSN 0030-9230, E-ISSN 1477-674X, Vol. 50, no 5, Special Issue, p. 668-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers the emergence of classroom wall charts as a teaching technology in Swedish elementary schools in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, using Biblical history teaching as an example. There has been some work done internationally on wall charts as an instructional technology, but few studies have looked at their use in Sweden. With a theoretical approach informed by Martin Lawn’s understanding of teaching technologies, this article shows that wall charts became both an important teaching object and a means of introducing new pedagogical ideas. A study of the official school inspectors’ reports shows that wall charts had spread to most local schools by the end of the nineteenth century, while an analysis of Biblical history textbooks and teaching guidelines shows that visual aids were increasingly integrated into the school curriculum. The wall charts themselves were initially imported, mainly from Germany, but by the end of the nineteenth century they were being produced in Sweden for the domestic market, in keeping with the National Romantic ideals of the day as well as with the new awareness of the importance of adapting images to use in classroom teaching.

  • 3.
    Larsson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The discovery of the social life of Swedish schoolchildren2012In: Paedagogica historica, ISSN 0030-9230, E-ISSN 1477-674X, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 121-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article demonstrates the “discovery of the social life of schoolchildren” by showing how an interest for children’s peer relations emerged in a Swedish educational and medial context. Drawing on historical and sociological childhood studies, the article analyses the concept of schoolchildren’s social life in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s in relation to changes in education, society and behavioural science. At the centre of attention is the apparent shift around 1970, observable in new interests in bullying among school children, when peer relations, going from almost unnoticed, became, seemingly overnight, the centre of the Swedish media discussions of children and school.

  • 4.
    Lindmark, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Erixon, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Creative Studies.
    Introduction: The many faces of literacy2008In: Paedagogica historica, ISSN 0030-9230, E-ISSN 1477-674X, Vol. 44, no 1-2, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Olofsson, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Early writing among ancient Vikings and today´s pre-schoolers: a cognitive developmental perspective on reading acquisition and alphabets as effective artefacts2008In: Paedagogica historica, ISSN 0030-9230, E-ISSN 1477-674X, Vol. 44, no 1-2, p. 167-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper reports some observations on pre-school children’s spontaneous as well as adult-supported spelling behaviour and makes comparisons between aspects of these early literacy activities and some features of spellings from mostly twelfth- to fourteenth-century Norwegian runic inscriptions. The runic inscriptions originate from a post-Viking time period where formal schooling was rare and exclusively based on the Latin alphabet. It is argued that runic literacy was serving several important functions in the society and that runic literacy skill was learned in an everyday sociocultural context and that this learning process in a critical way was supported by one major artefact – the runic alphabet itself. It is concluded that there are fundamental similarities between the learning activities among the children of today and the thirteenth-century self-supported print explorer. The basic commonality is alphabetical knowledge and it is concluded that primary knowledge of the actual alphabet is, and has always been, essential for the initial stage of reading acquisition.

  • 6.
    Åström Elmersjö, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Norden Associations and International Efforts to Change History Education, 1919–1970: International Organisations, Education, and Hegemonic Nationalism2015In: Paedagogica historica, ISSN 0030-9230, E-ISSN 1477-674X, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 727-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the interwar period, a number of organisations started to look into education as part of an attempt to understand how nationalism was fuelled through education and to what extent it had forced the outbreak of the Great War. These efforts coincided with a more general internationalisation of educational systems as part of the progressive movement. In response to nationalism and a perceived need for reformation of national narratives, the school subjects of history and geography became the primary suspects as advocates of chauvinism and militarism. In 1919, associations for the promotion of understanding and cooperation between the Scandinavian countries – the Norden Associations [föreningarna Norden] – began investigating history textbooks. The notion behind these efforts was that the Scandinavian peoples had especially strong natural and historical bonds that a false nationalism had eradicated, and in the zeitgeist of the time such bonds should be resurrected. This revision of textbooks was expanded in the 1930s to explore, assess, and develop the entire teaching of history in the Nordic countries. The Norden Associations converged on many levels with the disparate international movements for educational change that, in a broader sense, led to standardisation of not only history education, but also the whole educational system. This article presents the Norden Associations as part of a process of hegemonic isomorphism in which cultural hegemony set the institutional boundaries within which the organizations could work in order to attain legitimacy. The network of educators, researchers, organisations, and politicians that was involved in this process was vast. This article demonstrates how an organisation with a specific political agenda, and with only limited international objectives came to be – not only a part of – but, to some extent, an organisational role model for loftier efforts aimed at global and cosmopolitan history teachings.

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