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  • 1.
    Areljung, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Due, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    "Drawing the leaves anyway": teachers embracing children's different ways of knowing in preschool science practice2017Inngår i: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 47, nr 6, s. 1173-1192Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores if and how teachers combine practices of science and of preschool (children 1–5 years old) into preschool science practice. Views of knowing may differ between science practices, traditionally associated with masculinity and rationality, and preschool practices, traditionally associated with femininity and caring. Recognising this, wehave chosen to focus on how teachers’ talk constructs and relates to possible ways of gaining knowledge and reaching explanations of phenomena in preschool science. The analysis buildson two concept pairs often associated with gender as well as knowing: objective-subjective and logical-intuitive. The analysed material consists of 11 group interviews where preschool teachers talk about activities concerning science content. Our results show that several ways of knowing are possible in work with science content in preschool. These include ways of knowing more associated with subjectivity, such as ‘individual liking’ and ‘whole-body perception’, as well as more associated with objectivity, such as ‘noticing differences and similarities’. Furthermore, the results show that the teachers’ talk moves readily between possibilities associated with femininity (subjective and intuitive) and masculinity (objective and logical). This indicates that the teachers in this study have found ways to handle science in preschool that goes against presumed tensions between science and preschool practices. The results contribute to more nuanced ways of describing and thinking about science in preschool and pave the way for further development of science education in early childhood education.

  • 2.
    Berge, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    The Role of Humor in Learning Physics: a Study of Undergraduate Students2017Inngår i: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 47, nr 2, s. 427-450Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We all know that they do it, but what do students laugh about when learning science together? Although research has shown that students do use humor when they learn science, the role of humor in science education has received little attention. In this study, undergraduate students’ laughter during collaborative work in physics has been investigated. In order to do this, a framework inspired by conversation analysis has been used. Empirical data was drawn from two video-recorded sessions in which first-year engineering students solved physics problems together. The analysis revealed that the students’ use of humor was almost exclusively related to physics. Five themes identified summarize the role of humor in the group discussions: Something is obvious, Something is difficult, Something said might be wrong, Something is absurd, and Something said is not within informal norms.

    This study shows that humor may contribute not only to a good working atmosphere and thereby to the students’ learning but also how humor interrelates with both disciplinary culture of physics and its epistemology. The students do not only create and re-create humor that facilitates their social interactions, but through humor they constitute local norms of science and engage with the disciplinary discourse.

  • 3.
    Berge, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Uppsala University.
    Characterising learning interactions: a study of university students solving physics problems in groups2013Inngår i: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 43, nr 3, s. 1177-1196Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore how a group of four university physics students addressed mechanics problems, in terms of student direction of attention, problem solving strategies and their establishment of and ways of interacting. Adapted from positioning theory, the concepts ‘positioning’ and ‘storyline’ are used to describe and to analyse student interaction. Focused on how the students position the physics problems, themselves, and each other, the analyses produced five different storylines. The dominant storyline deals with how the students handled the problem solving, whilst two other storylines characterise alternative ways of handling the physics problems, whereas the two remaining storylines are concerned with how students positioned themselves and others—as either funny and/or knowledgeable physics students—and constitute different aspects of the physics community. Finally, the storylines are discussed in relation to the pedagogical situation, with recommendations made for teaching practice and future research.

  • 4.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Silfver, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Simon, Shirley
    Univ London, Inst Educ, London WC1N 1AZ, England.
    Teachers’ experience of working with socio-scientific issues: a large scale and in depth study2013Inngår i: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 43, nr 2, s. 599-617Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The research is an investigation of teachers’ experience of working with socio-scientific issues (SSI). A large group of teachers (55) chose one of six cases with the characteristics of SSI and were free to organize the work as they found appropriate. The research focuses on how teachers chose content, organized their work and experienced the students’ interest and learning. The teachers answered a questionnaire after working with the cases and seven of them were interviewed to provide in-depth understanding of issues raised in the questionnaire. The teachers found the SSI to be current topics with interesting content and relevant tasks and they felt confident about the work. They were quite content with the students’ learning of scientific facts, how to apply scientific knowledge and to search for information. However, they found that the students did not easily formulate questions, critically examine arguments or use media to obtain information about the task. The interviewed teachers did not find this work new, but they organized it as ‘a special event’. They understood SSI work as ‘free’ work and group work was frequent, but only a few of the teachers developed explicit strategies for teaching SSI. They had different ideas about learning but they all talked about knowledge as a set of facts to be taken in by the students. They all included elements of SSI but mostly to introduce the regular science content. However the teachers started to reflect upon the potential of using SSI to cover more goals in the curriculum.

  • 5.
    Högström, Per
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Fakultet för lärarutbildning, Matematik, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Fakultet för lärarutbildning, Matematik, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Benckert, Sylvia
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysik.
    Lab work and learning in secondary school chemistry: the importance of teacher and student interaction2010Inngår i: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 40, nr 4, s. 505-523Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory work is considered essential in promoting students' learning of science and of scientific inquiry. What the students perceive as important to learn from a regular laboratory exercise is probably affected by the teacher's objectives. We study to what extent one teacher's objectives are fulfilled during lab work, and how teacher-student and student-student interactions contribute to developing learning experiences from the laboratory exercise. Do students encounter opportunities to learn in agreement with the teacher's objectives? This explanatory single case study includes use of a palette of methods, such as pre- and post-interviews, observations and video documentation from anexperienced secondary school teacher and her 8th grade (aged 13-14) students' laboratory work. Our results point to the importance of teacher involvement to help students understand what to look for, how to do it and why. Especially teacher-student interactions during lab work seemed to influence what students perceived as important to learn. In the laboratory exercise in this case, the teacher helped the students to observe and to use their observations in their explanations. The lab work included learning experiences other than those addressed by the teacher, and the teacher's intentions were partially fulfilled. Not only what the teacher says, but also how the teacher acts is important to help students understand what to learn from a laboratory exercise.

  • 6.
    Lidar, Malena
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of Education and Professional Studies, King’s College London, London, UK.
    Berge, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    What Is Construed as Relevant Knowledge in Physics Teaching?: Similarities and Differences in How Knowledge and Power Are Staged in Three Lower Secondary Classrooms2018Inngår i: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The content that is privileged in teaching has consequences for what the students are given the opportunity to learn, and can thus be regarded as an aspect of power. We analyse power aspects in the teaching of physics by identifying actions that guide or direct other people's actions, and then analyse similarities and differences in different classrooms in terms of how governance is staged and what potential consequences this can have. The analyses are made on data from classroom activities, documented through video recordings and field notes, in three lower secondary schools in Y8 and Y9 respectively. At first glance, teachers from all three schools adhere to a traditional interpretation of a physics curriculum. But a more in-depth analysis shows that the students in the different classrooms are given quite dissimilar opportunities to participate in teaching and create relationships with the content. What appears to be a desirable way of acting offers different conditions for meaning-making. In an increasingly individualised society where people are expected to be active, reflective and make choices for their own personal good, the students in these three classrooms are offered very different conditions to practice and learn to take part in knowledge-making, connect physics content to their everyday life and exercise informed citizenship.

  • 7.
    Lönngren, Johanna
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Ingerman, Åke
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Svanström, Magdalena
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Avoid, Control, Succumb, or Balance: Engineering Students’ Approaches to a Wicked Sustainability Problem2017Inngår i: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 47, nr 4, s. 805-831Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Wicked sustainability problems (WSPs) are an important and particularly challenging type of problem. Science and engineering education can play an important role in preparing students to deal with such problems, but current educational practice may not adequately prepare students to do so. We address this gap by providing insights related to students’ abilities to address WSPs. Specifically, we aim to (I) describe key constituents of engineering students’ approaches to a WSP, (II) evaluate these approaches in relation to the normative context of education for sustainable development (ESD), and (III) identify relevant aspects of learning related to WSPs. Aim I is addressed through a phenomenographic study, while aims II and III are addressed by relating the results to research literature about human problem solving, sustainable development, and ESD. We describe four qualitatively different ways of approaching a specific WSP, as the outcome of the phenomenographic study: A. Simplify and avoid, B. Divide and control, C. Isolate and succumb, and D. Integrate and balance. We identify approach D as the most appropriate approach in the context of ESD, while A and C are not. On this basis, we identify three learning objectives related to students’ abilities to address WSPs: learn to use a fully integrative approach, distinguish WSPs from tame and well-structured problems, and understand and consider the normative context of SD. Finally, we provide recommendations for how these learning objectives can be used to guide the design of science and engineering educational activities.

  • 8.
    Ottander, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Malmö högskola.
    Students experience of working with Socio Scientific Issues: a quantitative study in secondary school2012Inngår i: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 42, nr 6, s. 1147-1163Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research project aims to investigate how students in lower secondary school experience work with socioscientific issues (SSI). The six socioscientific cases developed and used in this project are relevant according to characteristics of SSI and to the national curriculum. Approximately 1,500 students in Sweden have worked with one SSI case chosen by the teachers. A questionnaire-based instrument was used to measure the affective domain of students’ attitudes towards and interest in science before starting to work with the case and a second questionnaire after finishing a case. The second student questionnaire, measured the situational characteristics of the SSI work and perceived cognitive and affective outcomes. According to the students’ self-reported experience, all cases were interesting and related to a current issue. Most cases were equally interesting to boys and girls, the only exception was You are what you eat, which girls found more interesting than boys did. Almost all students claim that they learnt new facts, learnt to argue for their standpoint and to search and evaluate information during the work with the cases. The girls’ average scores were higher on several aspects of learning outcomes. Furthermore the students, especially the girls, perceived that the outcome of working with SSI had relevance for their future, with some cases more relevant than others. The more interesting the student found the case, the more they claimed they learnt. The students do not, however, claim that they learnt more science than during ordinary lessons.

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