umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Departement of Educational Measurement.
    Who is a successful student from the perspective of university teachers in two departments?2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, ISSN 0031-3831, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 543-559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Arnesen, Anne-Lise
    et al.
    Högskolen i Östfold, Norge.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Still Social and Democratic?: Inclusive Education Policies in the Nordic Welfare States2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 285-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, education policy is analysed from a welfare state perspective. The aim is to analyse the significance attributed to social‐inclusive aspects of education in contemporary education policies of the Nordic countries, and the extent to which education is regarded as an element in welfare policies. Four aspects are addressed: (1) access to education and measures to prevent social exclusion of young people, (2) comprehensiveness of education in terms of public/private, integration/segregation of e.g. minority children and children with special needs, (3) emphasis on democratic values and participation, (4) the importance of community and equality versus a focus on the individual. It is concluded that it is still justified to speak of the five Nordic countries as a rather distinct group. However, social‐inclusive policies have also clearly been reformulated and delimited, related to a strengthening of the economic‐utilitarian functions of education and a weakening of central education governance.

  • 3.
    Bergström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Jahnke, Isa
    University of Missouri-Columbia.
    Variations of symbolic power and control in the one-to-one computing classroom: Swedish teachers’ enacted didactical design decisions2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study provides new insights into Swedish teachers’ didactical designs when handling two contemporary challenges regarding the new national curriculum and the increasing digitalisation of schools through one-to-one computing initiatives. The research questions consider how teachers organise physical and digital resources in their classrooms as well as variations in teachers’ pedagogical communication. From a study of 23 one-to-one computing classrooms (using tablets), some ethnographic-inspired methods were applied based on classroom observation and recordings of teachers’ teaching. The findings show two distinct forms of teachers’ classroom organisation that indicate different didactical designs used by teachers to integrate one-to-one computing into the classroom. Variations in teaching resulted in a shift of symbolic power and control from teachers to students, which exploit the potential of using one-to-one computing in the classroom.

  • 4. Boesen, Jesper
    et al.
    Lithner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Palm, Torulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Assessing mathematical competencies: an analysis of Swedish national mathematics tests2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 109-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internationally, education reform has been directed towards describing educational goals that go beyond topic and content descriptions. The idea of mathematical competencies describes such goals. National tests have been seen as one way of communicating these goals and influence teaching. The present study analyses Swedish national tests in mathematics, and seeks evidence about the extent to which they represent these competencies and may play a role in reforming teaching. The results show that the national tests assess all competencies. However, the study also shows a limited focus on the competencies’ interpretation and evaluation aspects. Thus, the tests do not fully capture the complex nature of the competencies. This may cloud the reform message and restrict the possibilities for the tests to function as levers for reform.

  • 5.
    Eklöf, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Educational Measurement.
    Self-concept and valuing of mathematics in TIMSS 2003: Scale structure and relation to performance in a Swedish setting2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 297-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated whether two summated rating scales used in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS 2003), Mathematics Self-Concept (MSC), and Students' Valuing of Mathematics (VoM) seemed appropriate, meaningful, and useful in a Swedish context. The 4,256 Swedish eighth-grade students involved in TIMSS 2003 participated in the study. Items in the TIMSS Student Background Questionnaire asking for motivational beliefs were subjected to item analyses, principal components analyses, and confirmatory factor analyses. Factor scores were saved and regressed on mathematics score. The results indicated that the MSC scale was internally consistent, showed a simple factor structure that fitted the data rather well, and was positively related to mathematics achievement. The VoM scale was unrelated to mathematics score, showed a poor model-data fit, and the items in the scale were rather heterogeneous. The findings are discussed from an expectancy-value perspective and suggestions for researchers performing secondary analyses on TIMSS data are presented.

  • 6.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Dovemark, Marianne
    Social justice in Swedish post-16 education?: New preparatory programmes2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 570-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under a recent national curriculum reform in Sweden within a highly decentralised, competitive, and marketised education system, access to post-16 education is restricted. In this study, we map and analyse the early onset of new preparatory programmes. We draw on interviews with local politicians and school staff in six different municipalities, along with documents and statistics. The study is positioned within a framework of analysis of policy ideas and theoretical perspectives on inclusive education, equal education opportunities, and marketisation. Bernstein’s theoretical concept of “pedagogic rights” serves as a lens for the interpretation of the findings. The study suggests that the preparatory programmes tend to have marginalising effects for vast numbers of 16 plus students, in contrast to wider policy aims of social and economic inclusion and employability.

  • 7.
    Erixon, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Necessity or eccentricity: teaching writing in a new media ecology2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 865-883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns how teachers of Mother-Tongue Education (MTE) and pupils in Swedish secondary schools look upon and relate to the keyboard and screen and pen and paper, respectively, for writing in the context of MTE. The results showed that both teachers and pupils found that the computer on one side and the pen and paper on the other circumscribed different writing processes. Paper and pen offered greater resistance when writing than a computer. It was concluded that writing on a computer had been culturally appropriated in the MTE and represented the frame for both teachers and students from which they assessed the advantages and disadvantages of each technology, but also that paper and pen added a value of necessity rather than eccentricity for the pupils, in contrast to the teachers, in order to meet the requirements concerning grammar, longhand, and orthography. 

  • 8.
    Erixon, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Punctuated equilibrium: Digital technology in schools’ teaching of the mother tongue (Swedish)2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 337-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with how teachers and pupils in seventh to ninth grade in Sweden look upon and relate to the incorporation of new digital technology in mother tongue education (Swedish). The result shows that both the classification and framing of the subject is being challenged by new technology, but that the awareness of the impact seems to be limited. It is suggested that the development might now be approaching a stage where the gradual change, "evolution", that has taken place through all the invasive "forms of media" that have been added to the teaching environment, will now contribute to a punctuated equilibrium, which will hopefully lead to a new inner stability or homeostasis, in other words a paradigm shift. This, however, requires teachers to appropriate new technology as well as an awareness of its influence on the pedagogical discourse.

  • 9.
    Erixon, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    ECEC Students’ Writing Trajectories:: Academic Discourse and “Professional Habitus”2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden and many other countries, the academisation of teacher education goes along with increased emphasis on a student thesis, in Sweden formally entitled the final degree project. This study deals with students’ writing trajectories in Early Childhood Education and Care aimed at work in the preschool or the recreation centre. The study indicates that student writing, shaped by a variety of academic literacies, is primarily based on values of the vocational field, parallel to an emerging critical academic approach. The study suggests that academic writing is largely perceived among the students as a means to underpin the vocational field with theory, and see critical thinking and reflective practice as relevant to their future career.

  • 10.
    Gillander Gådin, Katja
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University.
    Weiner, Gaby
    Centre for Educational Sociology, university of Edinburgh.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    School health promotion to increase empowerment, gender equality and pupil participation: A focus group study of a Swedish elementary school initiative2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 54-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A school health promotion project was carried out in an elementary school in Sweden where active participation, gender equality, and empowerment were leading principles. The objective of the study was to understand challenges and to identify social processes of importance for such a project. Focus group interviews were conducted with 6 single-sex groups (7–12 year olds) in grade 1–2, grade 3–4, and grade 5–6 on 2 occasions. The analysis used a grounded theory approach. The analysis identified the core category “normalization processes of violence and harassment.” It is argued that school health promotion initiatives need to be aware of normalization processes of violence and, which may be counter-productive to the increase of empowerment and participation among all pupils.

  • 11. Hakvoort, Ilse
    et al.
    Larsson, Kristoffer
    Lundström, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Teachers’ Understandings of Emerging Conflicts2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars in the field of conflict resolution in schools theoretically argued that minor distractions and disturbances are conflicts. In the present study, we refer to them as emerging conflicts. The study has been carried out within the phenomenographic research tradition and used semi-structured interviews. We addressed the professionals – the teachers – who deal with emerging conflicts every day, investigating their different ways of understanding an emerging conflict. The 9 different ways we found make the collective and shared understandings of emerging conflicts visible and form a professional language with which to discuss these kinds of conflicts. These nine could be divided into three groups, the social practice of the classroom, something that stems from outside the classroom, and something that characterises all human interaction. The awareness of the existing understandings could further be discussed in relation to what is actually taught in teacher education in Sweden.

  • 12.
    Johnsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    “Great location, beautiful surroundings!”: Making sense of information materials intended as guidance for school choice2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 173-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following international trends during the last decades of the 20th century mechanisms of marketization, freedom of choice, and competition were introduced into the Swedish compulsory school system, thereby transforming it into one of the most de-regularized in the world. The overall aim of the pilot study presented here is to shed light on a phenomenon that has occurred as an effect of the shift in policy—namely on the information or marketing material which is directed from schools to families as guidance for school choice. The primary aim is to generate a conceptual basis for further research into the choice-related communication between schools and families. The information material analyzed consists of three annual volumes of a brochure, produced by the local education office in a middle-sized Swedish city area. Aside from picturing the content in terms of 145 symbolic expressions, sorted into 10 thematic categories, the results show how the material can be understood as made up of emotional imageries that give little guidance but that carry salvation stories on education and learning that have a transformative potential, as it opens up a new space for the governing of institutions and individuals.

  • 13.
    Knekta, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Are all Pupils Equally Motivated to do Their Best on all Tests?: Differences in Reported Test-Taking Motivation within and between Tests with Different Stakes2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated changes in reported test-taking motivation from a low-stakes to a high-stakes test and if there are differences in reported test-taking motivation between school classes. A questionnaire including scales assessing reported effort, expectancies, perceived importance, interest and test anxiety, was administered to a sample of pupils (n = 375) in 9th grade in direct connection to a national test field trial and then again to the same sample in connection to the regular national test in science. Two-level second order latent growth modelling was used to analyse data. In summary, the results show a significant increase in reported test-taking motivation from the field trial to the regular test and a significant variability in test-taking motivation between classes.

  • 14.
    Lindblad, Sverker
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, PO Box 2109, S 750 02 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Zackari, Gunilla
    Swedish Ministry of Education and Science, SE 103 33 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Educating for the New Sweden?2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 283-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we focus on Sweden as an advanced welfare state with a centralised educational system stressing modernisation and democratisation that was rapidly restructured into a deregulated, decentralised system based on vouchers and parental choice. The design was based on the collection of different kinds of data: policy texts, public statistics, in depth interviews with policy makers and administrators at different levels (n = 12) and teachers and headteachers (n = 42), surveys of students in Grade 9 in comprehensive schools (n = 413) in different contexts. In the interviews we found different recurrent themes in the narratives dealing with changes in education governance and on the subjects, students and teachers, in the system. By means of this we could portray a field of different conceptions of relations between education governance and social inclusion and exclusion among actors in different positions in Swedish education. The study showed large differences in the context of schools in terms of social and cultural backgrounds among students. We also found distinct differences between students in different cultural contexts. Those in contexts dominated by students of 'foreign background' were more loyal to traditional schooling cultures compared to more sceptical students from other contexts. In sum, our studies show a transition in the education culture in Sweden. This was conceptualised as a change in hegemony in the former welfare state where no alternatives are present in the current discourse on restructuring. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 15.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    The role of students' scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on how epistemic beliefs influence students’ learning in different contexts is ambiguous. Given this, we have examined the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs, their problem solving, and solutions in a constructionist computer-simulation in classical mechanics. The problem solving process and performance of 19 tenth grade students, with different scientific epistemic beliefs, was video recorded and inductively coded. Quantitative analysis revealed that different sets of epistemic beliefs were conducive to different aspects of students’ problem solving process and outcomes.  Theoretically sophisticated beliefs were in general associated with logical strategies and high solution complexity. However, authority dependence was associated with high degree of adherence to instructions. Hence, there might not be a universal relationship between theoretical sophistication of students’ epistemic beliefs and quality of learning outcomes. We suggest that the conduciveness to desired outcomes is a better measure of sophistication than theoretical non- contextualized a priori assumptions.

  • 16.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The front and back stages of Swedish school inspection: opening the black box of judgment2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides results from a study of the hidden processes of consensus formation that precede and make possible official judgments and decisions of the Swedish Schools Inspectorate (SI). The research question for the study was: How is knowledge negotiated on the back stage of school inspection and presented on the front stage? The article builds on in-depth case studies of school inspection in four schools. Data include internal and official material from SI, on-site observations of inspection in schools and internal quality assurance meetings at SI, and interviews with inspectors. The analysis is inspired by Goffman's usage of the concepts “front stage” and “back stage.” The results suggest that the SI front stage borrows legitimacy from an evidence-based model aiming at objective and “equivalent” judgments, while the back stage displays a complex mix of rigorous formalized guidance and uncertainty that requires inspectors’ brokering and deliberation.

  • 17. Linnakylä, Pirjo
    et al.
    Malin, Antero
    Taube, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Factors behind low reading literacy achievement.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 231-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The initial results of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) indicated that Finnish and Swedish students are among the best readers in all OECD countries. However, the literacy performance of 7% of Finnish and 12% of Swedish students remains at a level which is not sufficient for further studies or active citizenship. This article reports a further comparative study which explores, compares and contrasts, by means of two-level logistic regression models, students' personal, socio-economic and cultural factors and their effects on low as opposed to average reading literacy achievement in Finland and Sweden. The results indicate that the risk of being a low achiever is strongly determined by gender and by several sociocultural factors as well as by students' personal characteristics, attitudes and activities both at and outside school. The constructed model was relatively similar and predicted with approximately equal degrees of probability membership in the risk group in both countries. This lays a solid foundation for joint pedagogic developmental efforts

  • 18. Lundberg, Ingvar
    et al.
    Reichenberg, Monica
    Department of Education, University of Gothenburg.
    Developing reading comprehension among students with mild intellectual disabilities: an intervention study2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study demonstrated that students with mild intellectual disabilities are capable of constructing meaning from written text by guided social interaction. Participants were 40 adolescents in special schools divided into two intervention conditions: reciprocal teaching (RT) and inference teaching (IT). In RT the students practiced four active strategies, whereas IT involved practice in answering inference questions. The training included 16 sessions over eight weeks. Pre- and post-testing included five reading-related tests. The interaction in the small instructional groups was video-recorded. Improvement of test results was obtained in both conditions to about the same extent indicating that both interventions were beneficial. Analyses of the video-recordings demonstrated higher frequency of spontaneous reflections and generation of questions among students involved in RT.

  • 19.
    Lyrén, Per-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Educational Measurement.
    Prediction of academic performance by means of the Swedish scholastic assessment test2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 565-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reviews ten predictive validity studies of the Swedish Scholastic Assessment Test (SweSAT). A primary result is that the predictive validity of the SweSAT seems to be highly dependent upon the study programme being examined; that is, the predictive validity is better at some programmes than others. When compared with the upper-secondary school grade point average, the predictive validity of the SweSAT seems to be fairly good, but there are major differences between study programmes in this case as well. However, it is suggested that the validity of the results is to some extent threatened by methodological issues. A general conclusion is, therefore, that there is room for improving the test itself, as well as the way that predictive validity studies are carried out.

  • 20.
    Nygren, Karina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lennart, Nygren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    What happens with local survey findings?: a study of how adolescent school surveys are disseminated and utilized in Swedish schools2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 526-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aimed at examining the barriers to and facilitators of disseminating and utilizing the results of a local Swedish school survey. Interviews with 21 school district managers/principals were performed. Results showed that dissemination and utilization of local survey data appeared as two interrelated processes. With those processes, various barriers and facilitators were mentioned. The barriers and facilitators were not merely the opposites of each other; instead they qualitatively differed from each other depending on what phase in the process the manager/principal referred to. The results also showed that the dissemination phase was both a prerequisite for and interwoven with the utilization phase, e.g. dissemination efforts were important for how the survey results were utilized.

  • 21.
    Nyström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Educational Measurement.
    Reliability of educational assessments: The case of classification accuracy2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 427-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reliability is a problem inherent in all educational assessments, but the amount of attention this particular problem should be given is related to the function and use of the assessment. In this article, classification accuracy is put forward as a conceptualization of reliability that is meaningful for a large number of educational assessments. Furthermore, a fairly transparent method of estimating the magnitude of classification accuracy is developed. The article examines how the classification accuracy of a Swedish national test in mathematics is affected by changes in the test that are motivated by other validity concerns. The inquiry is based on the results on 1201 students participating in a Swedish national test in mathematics. The results indicate that there can be a significant trade-off between reliability and other aspects of validity.

  • 22.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Justifying the Need for Control: Motives for Swedish National School Inspection during Two Governments2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 385-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the political motives that underlie the increased educational control exercised by reinstalling and reinforcing school inspection during the periods of 20012003 and 2006-2008. These periods cover both social democratic and non-socialist governments, with different parties in office. The paper draws on an approach to scrutinize the process of problematization in public policy making applied on political policy documents. Overall, school inspection has been politically and ideologically unchallenged and justified on similar grounds by the two governments. By focusing on quality, equivalence and, in the latter period, educational and pupils' academic results, school inspection was legitimized and framed in a way that leaves no room for party political opposition.

  • 23.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Swedish Experiment with Localized Control of Time Schedules: Policy Problem Representations2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 119-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish compulsory schools are the most autonomous in Europe regarding time allocation and time management. Still, the Swedish state decided to take this even further, when introducing an experiment that permits some compulsory schools to abandon the regulations of the national time schedule. The aim of this study is to explore and analyse the representations of the policy problem that the experiment with local time schedules is designed to solve. Taking a post-positivist approach to policy analysis and drawing on official documents, the task is to uncover and contextualise these representations and to ask what remains untouched. The four representations of the problem which the experiment addressed all have the common denominator of the experiment producing a particular effect: to break through stagnation, to strengthen management by objectives, to remove an obsolete means of steering education, or to increase individualisation. Roughly, the effect-assumption takes into account either that a change will take place in schools or that changes that already have taken place will be legitimised.

  • 24.
    Segerholm, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hult, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Learning from and reacting to school inspection: two Swedish case narratives2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout Europe, school inspection has become a visible means of governing education. This education and inspection policy is mediated, brokered, interpreted, and learned through networked activities where the global/European meet the national/local, giving national and local “uptake” a variety of characteristics. We explore the local features of this “uptake” as processes of learning in the interaction between schools and inspectors in Sweden. Drawing theoretically on Jacobsson’s notion of governing as increasingly done through meditative activities and on Leontiev’s activity theory, we suggest that school actors learn compliance through diverse emotions provoked by inspection processes in different local settings. Based on observations of inspections, interviews with teachers, head teachers and inspectors, documents, reports, and decisions, we portray how governing education is done through inspection processes in two Swedish schools. The case narratives underscore the importance of local context in these governing and learning processes.

  • 25.
    Wedman, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Analysis of the Inter‐Item‐Covariance Matrix1972In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 25-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Wedman, Jonathan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Departement of Educational Measurement.
    Reasons for gender-related differential item functioning in a college admissions testIn: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender fairness in testing can be impeded by the presence of differential item functioning (DIF), which potentially causes test bias. In this study, the presence and causes of gender-related DIF were investigated with real data from 800 items answered by 250,000 test takers. DIF was examined using the Mantel-Haenszel and logistic regression procedures. Little DIF was found in the quantitative items and a moderate amount was found in the verbal items. Vocabulary items favored women if sampled from traditionally female domains but generally not vice versa if sampled from male domains. The sentence completion item format in the English reading comprehension subtest favored men regardless of content. The findings, if supported in a cross-validation study, can potentially lead to changes in how vocabulary items are sampled and in the use of the sentence completion format in English reading comprehension, thereby increasing gender fairness in the examined test.

  • 27.
    Wedman, Jonathan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Reasons for Gender-Related Differential Item Functioning in a College Admissions Test2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 959-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender fairness in testing can be impeded by the presence of differential item functioning (DIF), which potentially causes test bias. In this study, the presence and causes of gender-related DIF were investigated with real data from 800 items answered by 250,000 test takers. DIF was examined using the Mantel-Haenszel and logistic regression procedures. Little DIF was found in the quantitative items and a moderate amount was found in the verbal items. Vocabulary items favored women if sampled from traditionally female domains but generally not vice versa if sampled from male domains. The sentence completion item format in the English reading comprehension subtest favored men regardless of content. The findings, if supported in a cross-validation study, can potentially lead to changes in how vocabulary items are sampled and in the use of the sentence completion format in English reading comprehension, thereby increasing gender fairness in the examined test.

1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf