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  • 1.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK.
    Parmentier, Fabrice BR
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Jones, Dylan M
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Marsja, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    ‘What’s in a name?’ ‘No more than when it's mine own’. Evidence from auditory oddball distraction.2014In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 150, p. 161-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research of the distractor value of hearing the own name has shown that this self-referring stimulus captures attention in an involuntary fashion and create distraction. The behavioral studies are few and the outcomes are not always clear cut. In this study the distraction by own name compared to a control name was investigated by using a cross-modal oddball task in two experiments. In the first experiment, thirty-nine participants were conducting a computerized categorization task while exposed to, to-be ignored own and matched control names (controlling for familiarity, gender and number of syllables) as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (12.5% trials for each name category) and a sine wave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials). In the second experiment, another group of thirty-nine participants completed the same task but with the additional deviant stimulus of an irrelevant word added (10% trials for each deviant type and 70% trials with the standard stimulus). Results showed deviant distracton by exposure to both the irrelevant word, own and the control name compared to the standard tone but no differences were found showing that the own name captured attention and distracted the participants more than an irrelevant word or a control name. The results elucidate the role of the own name as a potent auditory distractor and possible limitations with its theoretical significance for general theories of attention are discussed.

  • 2.
    Madison, Guy
    Institutionen för psykologi, Uppsala universitet.
    Detection of linear temporal drift in sound sequences: principles and empirical evaluation2004In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 95-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The just noticeable difference (JND) for linearly increasing or decreasing successive time intervals (drift) was measured by means of an adaptive psychophysical procedure. Effects of number of intervals (Nint), direction (increasing or decreasing intervals), and inter onset interval (IOI) in a sequence were examined across 3 experiments. JND decreased as a function of  Nint in a negatively exponential fashion, and was not affected by direction. JND increased as function of IOI, with discontinuities close to 1 s and 1.4 s IOI. The results are compatible with a principle for detection in which an internal periodic process, based on the mean IOI of a few initial intervals in the stimulus sequence, is compared with the last few intervals. Principles based on comparing successive intervals, the first and last interval, or on comparing the last interval with an internal periodic process with the same IOI as the first interval were not supported.

  • 3.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sensori-motor synchronisation variability decreases as the number of metrical levels in the stimulus signal increases2014In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 147, p. 10-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Timing performance becomes less precise for longer intervals, which makes it difficult to achieve simultaneity in synchronisation with a rhythm. The metrical structure of music, characterised by hierarchical levels of binary or ternary subdivisions of time, may function to increase precision by providing additional timing information when the subdivisions are explicit. This hypothesis was tested by comparing synchronisation performance across different numbers of metrical levels conveyed by loudness of sounds, such that the slowest level was loudest and the fastest was softest. Fifteen participants moved their hand with one of 9 inter-beat intervals (IBIs) ranging from 524 to 3125 ms in 4 metrical level (ML) conditions ranging from 1 (one movement for each sound) to 4 (one movement for every 8th sound). The lowest relative variability (SD/IBI < 1.5%) was obtained for the 3 longest IBIs (1600–3125 ms) and MLs 3–4, significantly less than the smallest value (4–5% at 524–1024 ms) for any ML 1 condition in which all sounds are identical. Asynchronies were also more negative with higher ML. In conclusion, metrical subdivision provides information that facilitates temporal performance, which suggests an underlying neural multi-level mechanism capable of integrating information across levels.

  • 4.
    Madison, Guy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Karampela, Olympia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ullén, Fredrik
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute.
    Holm, Linus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Effects of practice on variability in an isochronous serial interval production task: asymptotical levels of tapping variability after training are similar to those of musicians2013In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 143, no 1, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Timing permeates everyday activities such as walking, dancing and music, yet the effect of short-term practicein this ubiquitous activity is largely unknown. In two training experiments involving sessions spreadacross several days, we examined short-term practice effects on timing variability in a sequential intervalproduction task. In Experiment 1, we varied the mode of response (e.g., drumstick and finger tapping) andthe level of sensory feedback. In Experiment 2 we varied the interval in 18 levels ranging from 500 ms to1624 ms. Both experiments showed a substantial decrease in variability within the first hour of practice,but little thereafter. This effect was similar across mode of response, amount of feedback, and interval duration,and was manifested as a reduction in both local variability (between neighboring intervals) and drift(fluctuation across multiple intervals). The results suggest mainly effects on motor implementation ratherthan on cognitive timing processes, and have methodological implications for timing studies that have notcontrolled for practice.

  • 5.
    Von Helversen, Bettina
    et al.
    University of Basel, Department of Psychology, Switzerland.
    Karlsson, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Mata, Rui
    Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.
    Wilke, Andreas
    Clarkson University, Department of Psychology, USA.
    Why does cue polarity information provide benefits in inference problems?: The role of strategy selection and knowledge of cue importance2013In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 73-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about cue polarity (i.e., the sign of a cue–criterion relation) seems to boost performance in a wide range of inference tasks. Knowledge about cue polarity information may enhance performance by increasing (1) the reliance on rule- relative to similarity-based strategies, and (2) explicit knowledge about the relative importance of cues. We investigated the relative contribution of these two mechanisms in a multiple-cue judgment task and a categorization task, which typically differ in the inference strategies they elicit and potentially the explicit task knowledge available to participants. In both tasks participants preferred rule-based relative to similarity-based strategies and had more knowledge about cue importance when cue polarity information was provided. Strategy selection was not related to increases in performance in the categorization task and could only partly explain increases in performance in the judgment task. In contrast, explicit knowledge about the importance of cues was related to better performance in both categorization and judgment independently of the strategy used. In sum, our results suggest that the benefits of receiving cue polarity information may span across tasks, such multiple-cue judgment and categorization, primarily by enhancing knowledge of relative cue importance.

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