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  • 1. Hildebrand Karlén, Malin
    et al.
    Lindqvist Bagge, Ann-Sophie
    Fahlke, Claudia
    Armelius, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Alcohol intoxicated witnesses' interpretation of social behavior in intimate partner violence2019In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 468-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol intoxication affects social information processing, though research is scarce regarding how alcohol affected eyewitnesses' perception of social interaction within an applied forensic context. In the present study, the effects of alcohol intoxication on eyewitnesses' perception of interaction in intimate partner violence (IPV) were investigated. The participants (n = 152) were randomized to an experimental (alcohol) or control group (juice). After consumption, they viewed a filmed IPV scenario where both interacting parties were confrontational. Afterwards, they rated the involved parties' behavior. Several behaviors were perceived in a similar manner by intoxicated and sober participants, but intoxicated participants perceived both parties' attacking behaviors and some of the man's prosocial behaviors differently than sober participants. Hence, alcohol affected some, but not all, kinds of social behaviors investigated in the present study. This would be of interest to legal praxis and to future studies on intoxicated witnesses to interpersonal violence.

  • 2.
    K Ljungberg, Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Permentier, Fabrice BR
    Department of Psychology, Edificio Cientifico-Tecnico, University of Balearic Islands, Palma, Spain.
    Hughes, Robert W
    School of Psychology Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Macken, William J
    School of Psychology Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Jones, Dylan M
    School of Psychology Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Listen out!: Behavioural and subjective responses to verbal warnings2012In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 451-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both the behavioural and subjective impacts of single-word spoken warnings were examined. Behaviourally, the effect of infrequently occurring warnings was studied through their disruptive impact on a visually presented serial recall task. In separate experiments, ratings of the same words were elicited. Experiment 1 showed a localized effect of the warnings (on the item immediately following the warning), with the urgently intoned warning having a greater disruptive effect than its valence (emotional content). Valence and intonation (urgency) did not interact. The performance changes were mirrored in the ratings of the words. Experiment 2 showed no systematic effect on performance of either the action-relatedness of the word or its lexicality. There was, however, a systematic effect of lexicality but not action-relatedness on ratings. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using objective performance methods to establish the likely effects of verbal warnings and the utility of using such methods for the design of alarm systems.

  • 3.
    Vestergren, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Perceived causes of everyday memory problems in a population-based sample aged 39–992011In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 641-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is usually a weak relation between memory complaints and laboratory memory performance, but few studies have investigated what people perceive as causes of their everyday memory problems. This study investigated prevalence, severity and perceived causes of memory problems in a population-based sample (N = 361, age-range 39–99). 30.2 per cent of the participants reported memory complaints (at least moderate memory problems). Higher age was associated with more severe memory problems, but the age-related differences were small. The most frequent perceived causes were age/ageing, stress and multitasking. Age/ageing as a cause was more frequent among older participants, and stress and multitasking were more frequent among middle-aged participants. The results suggest that everyday stress and level of engagement in multiple tasks or commitments, that place demands on cognitive resources, are important variables to consider when studying the relations between subjective everyday memory measures, age and memory performance in the laboratory.

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