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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Sandberg, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Engagement in New Dietary Habits: Obese Women's Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dietary weight loss interventions most often result in weight loss, but weight maintenance on a long-term basis is the main problem in obesity treatment. There is a need for an increased understanding of the behaviour patterns involved in adopting a new dietary behavior and to maintain the behaviour over time.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to explore overweight and obese middle-aged women's experiences of the dietary change processes when participating in a 2-year-long diet intervention.

    METHODS: Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 12 overweight and obese women (54-71 years) were made after their participation in a diet intervention programme. The programme was designed as a RCT study comparing a diet according to the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR diet) and a Palaeolithic diet (PD). Interviews were analysed according to Grounded Theory principles.

    RESULTS: A core category "Engagement phases in the process of a diet intervention" concluded the analysis. Four categories included the informants' experiences during different stages of the process of dietary change: "Honeymoon phase", "Everyday life phase", "It's up to you phase" and "Crossroads phase". The early part of the intervention period was called "Honeymoon phase" and was characterised by positive experiences, including perceived weight loss and extensive support. The next phases, the "Everyday life phase" and "It's up to you phase", contained the largest obstacles to change. The home environment appeared as a crucial factor, which could be decisive for maintenance of the new dietary habits or relapse into old habits in the last phase called "Crossroads phase".

    CONCLUSION: We identified various phases of engagement in the process of a long-term dietary intervention among middle-aged women. A clear personal goal and support from family and friends seem to be of major importance for long-term maintenance of new dietary habits. Gender relations within the household must be considered as a possible obstacle for women engaging in diet intervention.

  • 2. Ali, Tazeen S
    et al.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Intimate partner violence and mental health effects: a population-based study among married women in Karachi, Pakistan2013In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 131-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is recognized all over the world for its association with mental health problems in women. In Pakistan, such violence occurs commonly, but detailed information on mental health effects is scarce. The purpose of this study is to focused on married couples in urban Karachi to investigate mental health effects associated with physical, sexual and psychological violence perpetrated by husbands towards wives. Disclosure rates and health care-seeking behaviour were also investigated. METHOD: This cross-sectional study involved 759 women between the ages of 25 and 60 years, selected using a multi-stage random sampling technique. The women were interviewed by trained community midwives using a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: In the total population of women, mental symptoms were prevalent. Women subjected to any form of violence reported, however, considerably poorer mental health than unexposed women. A statistically significant difference for almost all of the studied health parameters persisted even after controlling for socio-demographic factors. The strongest associations were found for suicidal thoughts and physical violence (OR 4.41; 3.18-6.12), sexual abuse (OR 4.39; 3.17-6.07) and psychological abuse (OR 5.17; 3.28-8.15). The interviews revealed that only 27% of the women subjected to violence had disclosed this to anyone, in most cases to their parents. CONCLUSION: The findings in this study highlight that the violence women have to face contributes to the development of multiple forms of psychological stress and serious mental health problems. Women's restrictive life circumstances seriously hamper women's empowerment. Reliable health surveillance system and health care services are needed to serve abused women. Policy initiatives focused on IPV and gender inequality in Pakistan should be initiated.

  • 3. Allotey, P.
    et al.
    Reidpath, D. D.
    Verhoeff, A.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Data driven responses to the management of population based behaviour change: lessons, pitfalls and possibilities from across the GDP wealth divide2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S43-S44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Chan, D. K. C.
    et al.
    Ivarsson, A.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hagger, M. S.
    Inter-item distance changes the predictive power of motivation on health behavior?: a randomised controlled trial2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S237-S237Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Graner, Sophie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Karolinska Institutet Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of International Health Care Stockholm Sweden.
    Phuc, Ho Dang
    Institute of Mathematics Department of Probability and Mathematical Statistics Hanoi Vietnam.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University Department of Community Medicine and Public Health Gothenburg Sweden.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    The panorama and outcomes of pregnancies within a well-defined population in rural Vietnam 1999-20042009In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 269-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy outcomes in the general population are important public health indicators. PURPOSE: The overall aim of this study was to investigate the outcomes of reported pregnancies within a well-defined population, to identify risk groups for adverse pregnancy outcomes, and to suggest preventive measures. METHOD: A prospective population-based cohort study of pregnant women in Bavi district, Vietnam between 1 January 1999 and 30 June 2004. RESULTS: Pregnancy outcome was reported for 5,259 cases; 4,152 (79%) resulted in a live birth, 67 (1.3%) in a stillbirth, 733 (14%) in an induced abortion, and 282 (5.4%) in a spontaneous abortion. There was an increased risk of home delivery for women from ethnic minorities (OR = 1.85; 95%CI = 1.06-3.24) or with less than 6 years of schooling (OR = 7.36; 95%CI = 3.54-15.30). The risk of stillbirth was increased for ethnic minorities (OR = 6.34; 95%CI = 1.33-30.29) and women delivering at home (OR = 6.81; 95%CI = 2.40-19.30). The risk of induced abortion increased with maternal age. CONCLUSION: Our findings emphasize the public health significance of access to adequate family planning, counselling, and maternal health care for all women. Policies should specifically target women from high-risk groups.

  • 6.
    Ljung, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Rask, Merith
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Patient Experiences of a Theory-Based Lifestyle-Focused Group Treatment in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes2013In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 378-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes are two of the most common public health diseases, and up to 80 % of the cases may be prevented by lifestyle modification. The physiological effects of lifestyle-focused treatment are relatively well studied, but how patients actually experience such treatments is still rather unclear.

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to explore how patients experience lifestyle-focused group treatment in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

    METHOD: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 patients attending lifestyle-focused group treatment based on social cognitive theory at a behavioral medicine clinic in northern Sweden. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed according to Malterud's systematic text condensation.

    RESULTS: The study shows that patients participating in this kind of group-based lifestyle treatment went through a process of self-development which deepened their understanding of own responsibility for health and improved their skills in finding support in others. The process could be tracked through three different themes (the holistic view, personal responsibility, and group treatment) which together reflected the most essential parts of the informants' experience and showed the patient as an active decision maker struggling to adopt the principles of behavioral change.

    CONCLUSION: Lifestyle-focused group treatment, based on social cognitive theory, was shown to stimulate different components that strengthen patients' self-efficacy for long-term behavioral change.

  • 7.
    Nordin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lantto, L.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Young women's mental health in northern Sweden2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S3-S3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nordin, Steven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ståhlberg, L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Palmquist, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Intolerance to environmental odorous chemicals and sounds in irritable bowel syndrome2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S97-S98Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Novak, Masuma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Inequalities in smoking: influence of social chain of risks from adolescence to young adulthood: a prospective population-based cohort study.2007In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 181-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Olsson, E.
    et al.
    Held, C.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wallert, J.
    Myocardial infarction and Google searches on "stress"2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S167-S167Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Palmquist, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lundin, A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Associations between fibromyalgia and environmental intolerance2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S100-S100Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Palmquist, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Petrie, Keith J.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Psychometric Properties and Normative Data for a Swedish Version of the Modern Health Worries Scale2017In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 54-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modern health worries (MHW) scale was developed to assess individuals' worries about aspects of modernity and technology affecting personal health. The aim of this study was to psychometrically evaluate a Swedish version of the MHW scale and to provide Swedish normative data. Data were collected as part of the Vasterbotten Environmental Health Study, which has a random sample of 3406 Swedish adults (18-79 years). The Swedish version of the MHW scale showed excellent internal consistency and satisfactory convergent validity. A four-factor structure consistent with the original version was confirmed. The model showed invariance across age and sex. A slightly positively skewed and platykurtic distribution was found. Normative data for the general population and for combinations of specific age groups (young, middle aged, and elderly) and sex are presented. The psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the MHW scale suggest that use of this instrument is appropriate for assessing worries about modernity in Swedish-speaking and similar populations. The scale now has the advantage of good normative data being available. MHW may hold importance for understanding and predicting the development of functional disorders, such as idiopathic environmental intolerance and other medically unexplained conditions.

  • 13.
    Pettersson-Strömbäck, Anita
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Slunga-Järvholm, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Managers and coworkes perceptions of activity based work: a sub study of the aktikon project2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S149-S149Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Stenlund, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Burell, Gunilla
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, University of Uppsala.
    Steinholtz, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Edlund, Curt
    Nilsson, Leif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University.
    Slunga Birgander, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Cognitively oriented behavioral rehabilitation in combination with Qigong for patients on long-term sick leave because of burnout: REST - a randomized clinical trial2009In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 294-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Despite an increase in the occurrence of burnout, there is no agreement on what kind of rehabilitation these patients should be offered.

    Purpose

    Primary aim of this study was to evaluate effects on psychological variables and sick leave rates by two different group rehabilitation programs for patients on long-term sick leave because of burnout. Rehabilitation program A (Cognitively oriented Behavioral Rehabilitation (CBR) and Qigong) was compared with rehabilitation program B (Qigong only).

    Method

    In a randomized clinical trial, 96 women and 40 men with a mean age of 41.6 ± 7.4 years were allocated to one of the two rehabilitation programs.

    Results

    A per-protocol analysis showed no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the groups. Both groups improved significantly over time with reduced levels of burnout, self-rated stress behavior, fatigue, depression, anxiety, obsessive–compulsive symptoms, and sick leave rates. In an intention-to-treat analysis, patients in program A had fewer obsessive–compulsive symptoms and larger effect sizes in self-rated stress behavior and obsessive–compulsive symptoms compared to patients in program B.

    Conclusion

    This study showed no differences in effect between CBR and Qigong compared with Qigong only in a per-protocol analysis. Both rehabilitation programs showed positive effect for patients with burnout.

  • 15. Suominen, Sakari
    et al.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Umeå University.
    Kiviruusu, Olli
    Berg, Noora
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University.
    The higher the drop-out the more selected the respondents in term of health behaviour?: findings from four follow up postal health surveys with varying rates of attrition2018In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 25, p. S219-S219Article in journal (Other academic)
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