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  • 1.
    Mäntylä, Timo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sundström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Changing scenes: Memory for naturalistic events following change blindness2004In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 696-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on scene perception indicates that viewers often fail to detect large changes to scene regions when these changes occur during a visual disruption such as a saccade or a movie cut. In two experiments, we examined whether this relative inability to detect changes would produce systematic biases in event memory. In Experiment 1, participants decided whether two successively presented images were the same or different, followed by a memory task, in which they recalled the content of the viewed scene. In Experiment 2, participants viewed a short video, in which an actor carried out a series of daily activities, and central scenes' attributes were changed during a movie cut. A high degree of change blindness was observed in both experiments, and these effects were related to scene complexity (Experiment 1) and level of retrieval support (Experiment 2). Most important, participants reported the changed, rather than the initial, event attributes following a failure in change detection. These findings suggest that attentional limitations during encoding contribute to biases in episodic memory.

  • 2. Sjöberg, R L
    The catechism effect: child testimonies during a 17th-century witch panic as related to educational achievement.2000In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Testimonies from 488 children given to the priests of the parish of Rättvik during a preliminary investigation of a Swedish witch panic in 1670-71 are examined in relation to records from parish catechetical meetings held in 1671. The result implies that children who knew and understood at least parts of Luther's catechism were less liable to have falsely alleged that they had been kidnapped by female satanists during the witch panic of the previous year. It is suggested that these effects were caused by differences in cognitive, social, and emotional resources among these children as compared to those who were unable to learn and understand any parts of Luther's catechism.

  • 3. Wallsten, Tuula
    et al.
    Kjellin, Lars
    Sjoberg, Rickard L
    The diagnostic accuracy of questions about past experiences of being mechanically restrained in a population of psychiatric patients.2008In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 16, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information about stressful life experiences obtained from patients during diagnostic interviews is an important foundation for clinical decision making. In this study self-reports from 115 committed psychiatric patients of experiences of mechanical restraint were compared with medical records. The sensitivity of patient self-reports was 73% (11/15) and the specificity was 92% (92/100). No clear relationship between psychiatric symptoms and reliability of self-reports was identified. The results highlight the subjective qualities of narratives about past experiences.

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